CFP: “Gendering Native Modernisms” Panel @ Native American Art Studies Association Conference

I am seeking submissions for my panel on Gendering Native Modernisms at the biannual conference of the Native American Art Studies Association.  The conference will be held in October in Denver.  For more information on the conference go to:  http://nativearts.org/ The deadline for submission is just around the corner.  If you are interested but might need a little time, please do email me.

Gendering Native Modernisms
Chair: Cynthia Fowler, Emmanuel College

Recent scholarship on Native Modernisms has revealed the far more complex ways in which Native artists have actively defined and shaped Modernist art movements than has been previously recognized when relying solely on the lens of primitivism. In this scholarship, the agency of Native artists in defining modernism on their own terms has been recognized and relationships between Native and non-Native artists and collectors are now being more comprehensively understood through the lens of transcultural exchange. But the role that gender plays in these new narratives about modernism needs further exploration. To what extent are Native women artists included in these new narratives? To what extent do the gender biases of art museums influence the construction of these new narratives as art historians rely on existing collections in constructing them? How did gender constructions in Native communities affect the creation and distribution of Native modern art and how do they continue to influence these new narratives today? Overall, the panel will attempt to consider the impact of historical and contemporary gender constructions on emerging narratives about Native Modernisms.

Submit 100-word abstract for session Gendering Native Modernisms, by May 15, 2013 directly to: fowlecy@emmanuel.edu

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Author: Camara Dia Holloway

I am an art historian specializing in early twentieth century American art with particular focus on the history of photography, race and representation, and transatlantic modernist networks. I earned my PhD at Yale University in the History of Art Department. Besides my leadership role as the Founding Co-Director of the Association for Critical Race Art History (ACRAH), I am recognized for my expertise on African American Art, particularly African American Photography, and as a seasoned consultant for exhibitions, museum collections, and symposia/lectures planning.

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