Job Opportunity: Senior Digital Content Manager, Whitney Museum of American Art (Apply by Jan. 12, 2018)

The Senior Digital Content Manager at the Whitney Museum of American Art oversees the design, development and implementation of content strategies for the Museum’s digital platforms. The role is managerial and editorial in nature and develops digital project briefs and requirements, oversees content generation, and coordinates both internal and external production teams. The position’s primary objective is to use digital initiatives to increase engagement, both online and onsite, with the Whitney’s programming, mission and brand. As the lead liaison with Museum stakeholders, the role requires exceptional project management, storytelling, editorial, and digital experience-design skills.

 

 Responsibilities

  • Strategize and develop content across the Museum’s digital platforms.
  • Establish and maintain best practices for publishing on whitney.org, as well as other digital platforms, ensuring optimal usability, accessibility, and a consistent institutional voice across media.
  • Serve as editor for web copy, including website nomenclature, and exhibition and institutional announcements.
  • Serve as the primary project manager for all high-profile digital initiatives working closely with stakeholders throughout the Museum.
  • Oversee the development of digital requirement briefs, and manage budgets and timelines.
  • Oversee the production of video and audio content, ensuring a polished, consistent product; working with stakeholders to ensure success of livestreams of programs and events.
  • Produce institutional storytelling products, including the Whitney Stories series: conduct interviews, manage the editorial process, gather assets, and supervise outside contractors.
  • Oversee the Museum’s digital signage system and manage related contractor relationships.
  • Together with the Museum’s Digital Producer, manage website content via the Museum’s content management system, proofing and editing text for proper grammar and institutional style, and coordinating content with stakeholders throughout the Museum.
  • Work with Rights and Reproductions manager to obtain images and rights for content development and media production, as needed.

 

Requirements:

  • B.A.
  • 3–5 years professional digital content management or production experience.
  • Exceptional storytelling and production skills across media and platforms.
  • Strong background in planning and execution of media and technology initiatives, design thinking a plus.
  • Strong editorial skills, with a keen eye for consistency, accuracy, and detail.
  • Strong interpersonal skills and professional maturity in working with internal clients in a museum environment; ability and desire to communicate clearly about digital initiatives with non-technical staff.

 

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:  hr@whitney.org and write “Senior Digital Content Manager” in the subject line.  Deadline for submission is January 12, 2018.

 

 

About the Whitney:

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for 86 years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The Museum does not discriminate because of age, sex, religion, race, color, creed, national origin, alienage or citizenship, disability, marital status, partnership status, veteran status, gender (including gender identity), sexual orientation, or any other factor prohibited by law. The Museum hires and promotes individuals solely on the basis of their qualifications for the job to be filled. The Museum encourages all qualified candidates to apply for vacant positions at all levels. This description shall not be construed as a contract of any sort for a specific period of employment.

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Two new titles–African-American Art History

From Phoebe Wolfskill (Indiana Univ.), two new titles:

James Romaine and Phoebe Wolfskill, eds., Beholding Christ and Christianity in African American Art (Pennsylvania State Press, 2017)
https://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-07774-1.html

and

Phoebe Wolfskill, Archibald Motley Jr. and Racial Reinvention: The Old Negro in New Negro Art (University of Illinois Press, 2017)
http://go.illinois.edu/f17wolfskill

7183v4dNXpL

REV: The changing focus of black artists

Tonya Nelson examines the changing responses of black artists to racism since the Civil Rights Era

via From denouncing racism to destabilising systems: the changing focus of black artists — Media Diversified

2017 Terra Publication Grant Applications due Sept. 15

Letters of Inquiry for Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grants are due September 15.

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant supports book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that are under contract with a publisher. For this grant program, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States. Awards of up to $15,000 will be made in three distinct categories:

  • Grants to US publishers for manuscripts considering American art in an international context
  • Grants to non-US publishers for manuscripts on topics in American art
  • Grants for the translation of books on topics in American art to or from English.

Applicants must submit a letter of inquiry by September 15, 2017. The deadline for the receipt of completed applications is December 15, 2017.

For more information, please visit the College Art Association website, where you will find application guidelines and the application process, schedule, and checklist, or contact CAA Editorial Manager Sarah Zabrodski at szabrodski@collegeart.org or +1 212-392-4424.
Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 501914–15. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61

TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART

120 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611 USA   +1 312 664 3939
121 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France   +33 1 43 20 67 01

 

CFP: Special Latino Art issue of the Archives of American Art Journal

Call for essay proposals closes March 1

The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art is planning an issue of the Archives of American Art Journal devoted to Latino art. This special issue will offer a valuable opportunity for scholars and artists to increase the visibility of Latino studies in the field of American art history as well as enrich the study of Latino art with primary sources at the Archives of American Art. While the Archives has been collecting the papers of Latino artists for decades, the focused collecting initiative that it launched in 2015 has resulted in the acquisition of many important new collections, which include the personal papers of artists, gallery and organization records, and oral history interviews. You can explore the Archives’ Latino art research collections online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

Essays selected for publication in the journal will offer new approaches to Latino art and artists by thinking in innovative ways about primary sources in the Archives of American Art. Authors must identify the specific collections that will inform their research. Please include the following in a single MS Word document and email it to Tanya Sheehan, editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, SheehanT@si.edu, by March 1, 2017:

* Author name and contact information

* Proposed manuscript title and abstract of no more than 250 words

The journal’s editorial team will review the proposals and then invite select authors to prepare a manuscript of 5,000-7,000 words (including endnotes) for double-blind peer review. Complete manuscripts for review will be due by July 1, 2017. Essays must be previously unpublished and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Archives of American Art Journal is the longest-running scholarly journal devoted to the history of American art. It aims to showcase new approaches to and out-of-the-box thinking about primary sources. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press, the journal contains both peer-reviewed research and commissioned articles based in part on the vast holdings of the Archives.

Information on manuscript submissions and review criteria is available on the journal’s webpage, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/aaa.

CFP: “Colonial Caribbean Visual Cultures” special issue of Atlantic Studies: Global Currents

Special Issue: “Colonial Caribbean Visual Cultures”

This multidisciplinary collection will examine the creation and circulation of colonial visual cultures from the Caribbean during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The era of Caribbean slavery placed the islands at the centre of the production and movement of goods, ideas, money and peoples, as well as cultural conflicts, exchanges and hybridities which created new challenges for artists, and new ways of looking. As a cornerstone of European imperial expansion the Caribbean had an enormous imaginative influence on Europe and the wider world. Tropical vistas and diverse peoples provided new visual subjects, and the art of the Caribbean participated in the circum-Atlantic movement of aesthetics, ideas and images: from mid-eighteenth-century georgic scenes which attempted to reconcile beauty with enslaved labour, to the colonial picturesque of the 1790s which rearticulated metropolitan landscape visions, to the unique botanical and zoological images which emerged from natural histories and travel narratives, and latterly to the early photography which marketed the West Indies to potential tourists. Significantly, the collection will position African-Caribbean, maroon, and indigenous material cultures at the centre of its exploration of how Caribbean visual cultures were related to the ways of seeing associated with modernity.

This collection invites contributors from history of art, literature, anthropology, history and geography and other disciplines to focus their attention on the specific dynamics of Caribbean visual cultures. What ways of seeing emerge under the conditions of slavery? How were images and objects produced, circulated and consumed in the colonial context? What were the relationships between text and image in pre-disciplinary forms such as the travel narrative? How did visual cultures operate across the heterogeneous cultures and geographies of the Caribbean islands? What were the relationships between colonial and metropolitan aesthetic images and practices? By focusing on the Caribbean islands and the circum-Atlantic production of imagery which they engendered, the essays in this volume will open up alternate genealogies and geographies for Caribbean art and ideas about the visual that are central to the emergence of colonial modernity.

Topics might include:

  • Circum-Atlantic aesthetics and the relationships between metropolitan and colonial visual forms;
  • Transnational contexts and intersections between empires;
  • Colonial ways of seeing and visual production under slavery;
  • Ways of disaggregating the ‘colonial gaze’;
  • Intersections between text and image;
  • Indigenous, slave and maroon cultures;
  • The visual representation of indentured labourers from Asia;
  • The impact of Caribbean visual cultures on those of Europe;
  • Natural history, science and medicine; travel narratives and other pre-disciplinary forms;
  • How objects shift through value systems, functions and contexts,
  • Ideas of vision in the context of colonial modernity.

Successful essays will be included in a special issue of Atlantic Studies: Global Currents

Please submit a 500-word abstract and a brief cv by 15 March 2017 to Emily Senior and Sarah Thomas: e.senior@bbk.ac.uk; sarah.thomas@bbk.ac.uk

Deadline for full scripts will be 15 November 2017

CFP: Art of the Latinx Diaspora @ Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies (JOLLAS)

CFP: Art of the Latinx Diaspora

Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2018

The Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies (JOLLAS) seeks contributions for a special issue on the Art of the Latinx Diaspora. All media, periods and geographies are eligible, and contributors are encouraged to think broadly and innovatively about the ways in which the Latinx diaspora and its cultural production are framed. Scholarship from all art-related disciplines, including Art History, Curatorial Studies, Art Education, etc. is welcome. Technical and quantitative methodologies are invited.

Interested parties are asked to submit a full draft manuscript (10-20 pages in length, notes and images included), in MSWord compatible and PDF format to arduran[at]unomaha.edu by 15 March 2017. Submissions will be peer-reviewed.

For more information, please visit:
http://jollas.org
http://www.unomaha.edu/college-of-arts-and-sciences/ollas/index.php

About JOLLAS:
The Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies (JOLLAS) is an interdisciplinary, international, and peer reviewed on-line journal housed at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The journal seeks to be reflective of the shifting demographics, geographic dispersion, and new community formations occurring among Latino populations across borders and throughout the Americas. The journal emphasizes the collective understanding of Latino issues in the U.S. while recognizing the growing importance of transnationalism and the porous borders of Latino/Latin American identities.
The Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies welcomes quality scholarship from relevant academic disciplines as well as from practitioners in the private and public sectors. JOLLAS is receptive to scholarship coming from a variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. All research should be understood and examined from a transnational perspective.

JOLLAS’ Mission:
To publish academically rigorous scholarship with real-world applicability to the understanding of Latino/Latin American peoples and critical issues.

All inquiries should be directed to Adrian R. Duran, Associate Professor, Art & Art History, University of Nebraska at Omaha, arduran@unomaha.edu

The Sounds of Ethncity, Race and Region

how-to-speak-midwesternIn today’s New York Times, Jennifer Schuessler reviewed a new book, How to Speak Midwestern. Interestingly, the headline in the print edition is:  “Midwesterner, Yes, You Do Have an Accent”. This phrasing is a gentle nudge to rethink what might be perceived as a norm, which, of course, is actually as inflected as anything else. Apparently, this truth is one of author Edward McClelland’s motivations for writing this book.

In the review, Schuessler comes out from behind the curtain of reviewer neutrality. She pronounces, self-deprecatingly: “Full disclosure: Like Mrs. Clinton, I’m a white woman who grew up in the Chicago suburbs. When it comes to pinched nasal vowels and strongly pronounced r’s (a phenomenon linguists call rhoticity), I’m With Her.”

Schuessler also notes: “The heavily industrialized (and segregated) Inland North–as dialectologists call the region stretching from roughly from central New York across the Great Lakes–‘has a wider divergence between white and black speech than anywhere in the country,’ Mr. McClleland writes, with African-Americans largely maintaining speech patterns brought from the South. (Mr. McClelland notes the existence of various Midwestern ‘blacaccents,’ though he doesn’t explore them.)”

Such “blaccents” are not the only subjects deserving of further study by critical race scholars. So is the consideration of the visual. Tellingly, the designers for McClelland’s book eschew figures for its cover, as if to acknowledge the demographic diversity of the region’s populace. Smart move.

Consider the ideology of an earlier publication (1960) with almost the same title:

thomas-how-to-speak-midwestern

This book is a “humor” offering. See Google Books for a brief excerpt:

“To speak good Midwestern you need to: Get gear’d up by studyin’ this book. Before you know it you’ll be speaking Midwestern Pertnear as good as Everybody.”

Thomas’s cover design is serious in its invocation, i.e., the Midwest is American Gothic (1930). It is a move to use the authority of the original painting, without any awareness of its intended satire.

 

 

Marvel celebrates fifty years of Black Panther at NYCC — Dark Matters

LINK: “I can’t believe we were publishing this in 1973!”

via Marvel celebrates fifty years of Black Panther at NYCC — Dark Matters

Color portraits of immigrants at Ellis Island – in pictures | Culture | The Guardian

Immigrants as types — Ellis Island arrivals