New issue of liquid blackness

liquid blackness is pleased to announce the publication of a special issue of the open-access journal liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies (5:2), edited by Alessandra Raengo and Lauren McLeod Cramer on “blackness.”

This special issue is the second of three foundational issues on liquid blackness’s core concepts of “liquidity,” “blackness,” and “aesthetics.” Contributors reflect on how blackness indexes its own processes across sonic, chromatic, and performative registers. The authors approach the idea of “indexing” with jurisgenerative sensibility, showcasing modes of critical engagement that highlight the dynamic, self-reflective, archival knowingness of various object and practices, reaffirming the aesthetic realm as a privileged processing site. Attuned to the liquidity of the black arts, each author offers original insights into the relationship between black object-making and black art-making.

Contributors are Sampada Aranke, Lauren McLeod Cramer, Michael Boyce Gillespie, Kristin Juarez, Homay King, Walton Muyumba, Mark Anthony Neal, Alessandra Raengo, Jared Sexton, and Lisa Uddin.

Read the issue at https://read.dukeupress.edu/liquid-blackness/issue/5/2.

CFP: Black and Queer, Music on Screen, liquid blackness

liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies 7, no. 1, Spring 2023

Co-edited by Ïxkári Estelle, James Tobias (Sync: Stylistics of Hieroglyphic Time), Stefan Torralba, and Calvin Warren (Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, Emancipation)

This special issue of liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies proposes to work on Black Queer expression in audiovisual musics cutting across histories of the avant-garde, popular audiovisuality, and frameworks both transnational and critically transhistorical. The goal of the issue is to set up the framework for a survey of Black and Queer musicality in audiovisual media so as to suggest “non-contemporaneous” dialogues between and across historical registers and media platforms, so that the critical expressive power of non-conforming persons of color become a given rather than an alibi, an absence, or a projection.

From early sound cinema to the present, queer or gender non-conforming black artists have voiced a complex series of claims, propositions, demands, and desires, from the introduction of sound to the cinematic screen to the introduction of social media video in networked digital cultures. Black feminist and queer scholarship has often engaged with the meanings and powers expressed in these works, or in musical artists indebted to them or referencing them, from Angela Davis’ reading of transformations of historical memory in Smith’s St. Louis Blues (Blues Legacies and Black Feminisms), to Lindon Barrett’s study of Billie Holiday (Blackness and Value), to Saidiya Hartman’s discussion of errancy in relation to woman-identified women singers in the early years of recording (Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments), and DaphneBrooks’ recent reading of black women’s use of arrangement, sonic curation, and blackness as technology (Liner Notes for the Revolution) in articulating a politics of being and becoming. Working through postcolonial, decolonial, diasporic, and critical ethnic studies’ critical innovations, we may productively identify discontinuities in terms of technical medium and mode of distribution, from film short, to soundie, to Hollywood musical set piece, to film promotional clips, music television clips, and music video made for social media. At the same time, we will also observe the ways in which concepts like Sharpe’s “wake work,” “fugitivity” in Moten’s critical aesthetics, “opacity” in Fleetwood, Browne, or Musser, “boiz” or non-normative sex-gender identities in Harris, the expressive technics of “queer OS” in Keeling, or “ontological terror” in Warren – only a few of potentially generative formulations appearing in recent Black Study – may help gloss the gestures, meanings, and forces at work in black queer voice in technical mediation. How may we read the histories and futures of audiovisual musicality in these terms, given the dynamic work of artists over the last decade ranging from, say, Zebra Katz to Janelle Monae, Odd Future et. al., Mykki Blanco, Moses Sumney – and many more, too numerous to list here?


Black and Queer, Music on Screen seeks to redress a grave limitation in current scholarship. Typically, attention to medium and historical specificities in studies of onscreen musicality have so prioritized the form/medium problem in cinema, video, or digital media studies, such that attention to “film,” “video,” or “digital” formats pre-empts the observation of continuities or conversations across historical periods or transitioning media. One result is that even as black and sex-gender non-confirming subjects are “rediscovered” in “early sound film,” black and sex- gender non-confirming innovations in later moments and in the contemporary moment are cordoned off from one another, safely consigned to some futural fate of what will be a belated rediscovery, or held apart as “alternatives” to the dominant rather than continuing a long- standing historical critique.

While the disciplinary preoccupations of cinema and media studies with regard to medium specificity and period have made it unlikely that concerns and problems expressed in the technical mediation of Black Queer voice as musical expression to surface as primary problems in cinema and media studies, nevertheless, some of the most affecting and influential works of artist cinema – Julien’s Looking for Langston, for example – have clearly problematized and made substance of these aesthetic and political histories, as well as their deferral in the culture industries and in the academy alike. This special issue calls for critical work centering both historical and recent upsurges in the aesthetic and critical powers of Black and Queer musical expression on screen. What happens when we understand, as Bey (2020) has argued, “the history of blackness as a history of disruption,” so that disrupting racializations along with sex-gender non-conformance become productive of the labor animating audiovisual music’s meaning and effects?

Finally, we ask, what does the sound, voice, or gesture of radical ethical demand feel like when it hits the poetics and aesthetics of the musical screen? What revolutions, in other words, in retrospect and in theory, can we understand to have in fact been sung, danced, and thus enjoined once we align the relevant critical frameworks and exemplars, so that the limits and obstacles to a larger historical and theoretical understanding of expressive queer black gesture are removed?

Topics List
• Black queer practices of exceeding and disabling technology in the form of musical, audiovisual technics• Archival recovery, fictive archiving, and critical fabulation of the archive through voice, sound, music, and musical audiovisuality• Hemispheric and triangular kinships of Black queer media as musical counter-positions within the Americas• Productivities and problematics of Black queer practices enabling “queer of color” expression• The politics of citation, reference, and allusion in Black queer musical media practices• Transmedia musical imaginaries, ethics, and aesthetics• Surprising transnational circuits of visual imageries and performance practices, that is, audiovisual treatments of the Black Atlantic or the Black Pacific• Musicality, voice, and sound informing counterintuitive or counterhegemonic readings of popular Back queer media• Digitality, diaspora, musicality• Soul as reason: re-thinking the place of affect as paralinguistic rhetoric of critique, community, or desire • “Dirty” computing, musical freakdom, and the gestural paragrammatics of collective self- fashioning• Musicality and remembrance as transformation of collective memory, in Black musical film more generally, in addition to Blues women’s recordings.• Afro-Historicisms, Afro-Futurisms, or Afro-Pessimisms on the musical screen• Shouts and whispers on screen: historical claims and rhetorics in Black audiovision• Cool, hot, noise: style on the musical screen• Analytics of track, mix, and edit on screen as homologies of self-fashioning and collective movement• Ad hoc surrealisms, absurdisms, anti-realisms: musicality as fugitivity• Generational non-contemporaneity: Black voice carrying over and beyond period and across medium 

Submission Due: January 15, 2022 (send to journalsubmissions@liquidblackness.com)

Author Guidelines & Submission Information• Submission Types:• Traditional essays: approx. 3-5,000 words (including footnotes)—all essays should be accompanied by at least one image• We welcome submissions of interviews, visual and textual art, video, and other artistic work• Questions about the length, style, format of experimental submissions can be directed to journalsubmissions@liquidblackness.com• liquid blackness follows the formatting and reference guidelines stipulated by The Chicago Manual of Style• All submissions, solicited and unsolicited, will be peer-reviewed• Media Specifications• We welcome the submission of media files such as video or sound clips, which will be published as supplementary data. The following audio and video file types are acceptable as supplementary data files and supported by our online platform:.mp3, .mp4, .wav, .wma, .au, .m4a, .mpg, .mpeg, .mov, .avi, .wmv., html.• Executable files (.exe) are not acceptable.• There is no restriction on the number of files per article or on the size of files; however, please keep in mind that very large files may be problematic for readers with slow connection speeds.• Please ensure that each video or audio clip is called out in the text of the article, much like how a figure or table is called out: e.g., “see supplementary audio file 1.”

—About liquid blackness
• liquid blackness is an open-access journal, which means that all content is freely available without charge to readers or their institutions.• Our Editorial and Advisory Boards 

Mission Statement
The liquid blackness journal seeks to carve out a place for aesthetic theory and the most radical agenda of Black Studies to come together in productive ways, with a double goal: to fully attend to the aesthetic work of blackness and to the political work of form. In this way, the journal strives to develop innovative approaches and analytic tools to address points ofconvergence between the exigencies of black life and the many slippery ways in which blackness is encountered in contemporary sonic and visual culture.

liquid blackness aims to establish a point of exchange at the intersection of multiple fields. The history of this intentionally undisciplined space is best understood through a series of questions pivoting around (1) the relationship between aesthetics and the ontology of blackness and (2) the generative potential of blackness as an aesthetic. If blackness is, as we argue after Fred Moten, an unregulated generative force, then the liquid blackness journal seeks to offer a dedicated space where it can be consistently unleashed. As we extend and confront lines of inquiry from a number of research fields, our approach is equally concerned with theoretical content, analytical methods, and scholarly praxis.

JOB: Developmental editors for professional development program, Toward Equity in Publishing

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is accepting  bids to contract developmental editors for Toward Equity in Publishing (TEP), the professional development program launched by the journal American Art and supported by a grant from the Dedalus Foundation. The position entails providing developmental and line editing to TEP author-participants. Each editor will assist 2–4 TEP author-participants, providing up to 40 hours of service to each, not to exceed 160 hours per year. The number of author-participants assigned to each editor will depend on how many developmental editors are contracted by the Smithsonian. Work will commence on or after February 1, 2022, with a possibility to extend for a total of 28 months, depending on satisfactory performance and availability of funds. The closing date for contract bids is November 15, 2021.

To receive the Request for Quotes, Statement of Work, and instructions for submitting the bid, please write to AmericanArtJournal@si.edu.

Prospective contractors are strongly encouraged to enroll in the federal System for Award Management (SAM). The contract cannot be made prior to evidence of the contractor’s active and valid registration in the “all awards” category of SAM.

For further details, please contact the executive editor, Robin Veder, at AmericanArtJournal@si.edu, with your surname and the header “TEP Developmental Editor” in the subject line.

CFP: “In Situ” for Art Institute Review–deadline Mon., Oct. 11, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS

Issue 3: In Situ (September 2022)

Deadline for proposals: Monday, October 11, 2021

This issue of the Art Institute Review addresses the concept of in situ—a natural, original, or existing position or place. The notion relates to basic questions art historians, conservators, curators, and other cultural heritage professionals ask about all works of art: Where were they installed or exhibited? How were they experienced in their original time and location? To what extent did these initial contexts orient and shape artistic intent? Location and place may change over time. What happens when the physical context of a work of art is interrupted or upended? What are the stakes surrounding its placement and/or displacement? Research and analysis are themselves informed by position and place. How are art historical, conservation, and material science methods shaped in situ? How must they change when addressing a work of art that has been removed from its original context(s)?

Such questions regarding the past, present, and future of artworks have always been important in art history and related disciplines, but they have taken on even greater weight in our particular moment. What does it mean to recontextualize works in new spaces? What happens when we privilege one point in an artwork’s history over another—or when we deprioritize or disregard that history? How can digital tools and technologies help us better understand, question, and critique the “place” of art?

The third issue of the Art Institute Review invites you to consider, interrogate, and visualize the concept of in situ, understood broadly. We welcome topics from an expansive geographical, temporal, and theoretical range that could include: archaeological investigation and research, theoretical and practical projects of restitution and decolonization; community-based conservation; site-specific artworks and interventions, Gesamtkunstwerk, and land art projects; digital and material re-creations of artistic sites and architectural settings; and more. We especially welcome proposals focused on historically underrepresented objects or narratives, proposals from emerging scholars, and proposals that optimize the digital platform. Not only is the digital realm itself a place ripe for critical exploration through the theme, but it also supports innovative technological experiments and creative realizations of historic, contemporary, and imagined spaces.

This issue is co-edited by Elizabeth McGoey, Associate Curator of Arts of the Americas, the Art Institute of Chicago, and Jeanne Marie Teutonico, Associate Director of Strategic Initiatives and Publications at the Getty Conservation Institute.

Submit proposals here.

For more information on what we’re looking for, visit the journal website, here.

We aim to review proposals and notify the authors of accepted proposals within approximately one month of receipt. Full manuscript is due about two months after notification.

Competition for the 2022 ALAA/LASA-VCS Afro Latin American/Afro-Latinx Scholarship Prize

The Association for Latin American Art, an affiliate of the College Art Association, and the Visual Culture Section of the Latin American Studies Association, are pleased to sponsor the ALAA Annual Afro Latin American/Afro-Latinx Essay Prize. We will consider scholarly essays published in a peer reviewed journal, edited volume, or exhibition catalogue during the previous year, on any aspect of Afro Latin American art, architecture, or visual culture in Latin America and the United States, covering any period from the colonial era to the present. The award consists of a $500 honorarium and will be presented at the ALAA business meeting at the annual meeting of the College Art Association in February as well as the LASA business meeting at the annual conference in April. The name of the recipient will appear in the newsletters of both ALAA and LASA.

For the February 2022 Award, we will evaluate articles that meet the following criteria:
• Publication date between September 1, 2020 and August 31, 2021.
• Essays may be written in English, Spanish, or Portuguese.

Essays will be evaluated by a three-person committee of accomplished scholars in the field, each with expertise in a wide geographical and temporal range. For consideration, authors should send their submission as a pdf to the Chair of the award committee no later than November 15, 2021. Peer nominations will also be accepted.

Afro Latin American/Afro-Latinx Scholarship Prize Committee
Paul Niell, pniell@fsu.edu
Mey-Yen Moriuchi, moriuchi@lasalle.edu
Tamara Walker, tamara.walker@utoronto.ca

JOB: Managing Editor, American Art

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is accepting applications for managing editor of American Art, the peer-reviewed journal co-published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the University of Chicago Press. The position entails support to SAAM’s Research and Scholars Center, including management of rights and reproductions, peer-review, fact-checking, copyediting, proofing, and prize administration. The closing date is March 30, 2021.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/595128400
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/595128100
Additionally, interested applicants are encouraged to submit bids for the interim managing editor contract. The length of contract will depend on the timing for the permanent hire. To receive the Request for Quotes, Statement of Work, and instructions for submitting the bid, write to AmericanArtJournal@si.edu with the header “Interim Managing Editor.” The closing date for the interim contract is March 26, 2021.

CFP: Afro Gothic

Afro-Gothic: Black Horror and the Relentless Haunting of Traumatic Pasts
Call for Papers
For Afro-Gothic: Black Horror and the Relentless Haunting of Traumatic Pasts, we seek work that explores the Afro-Gothic as an aesthetic and as a means of working through the trauma of colonial slavery. Although the Gothic genre is widely discussed as a purely European literary tradition, the gothic manifests as a global phenomenon. Every culture possesses its own ghost stories, monster tales, or myths about creatures with supernatural powers. This project examines how the tropes of the gothic—with its constructions of the monstrous, the villainous, the mad and the haunted—take on wholly different valences when they are studied within the contexts of blackness, particularly under the modern colonial project. In our view, one important characteristic of the Afro-Gothic that distinguishes it from its European counterpart is its rootedness in lived black experiences. The Afro-Gothic often addresses the everydayness of black horror in ways that attest to the repetitive violence against black bodies and the relentless haunting of traumatic pasts.

We seek work that explores Afro-Gothic sensibilities in film, fiction, performance, and the visual arts. What we might call Afro-Gothic narratives have emerged lately in popular works by Jordan Peele (Get Out and Candyman), in the series Tales from the Hood (1995/2018) and Lovecraft Country (2020), Childish Gambino’s This is America, and Kara Walker’s antebellum silhouettes, to name just a few. We are interested in works that expand and explode current generic definitions of the Gothic and highlight the ways in which contemporary black artists are reckoning with aesthetics. In what ways does the Afro-Gothic serve to frame our understanding of the contemporary moment through a dark prism of organized terror?

Possible topics to explore might include (but are certainly not limited to):
• colonial hauntings – living among ghosts and the walking dead
• the plight of the hunted and state-sanctioned violence
• dark tourism and haunted houses
• maritime Afro-Gothic – nautical narratives
• medical experimentation and the trope of the mad scientist
• miscegenation, hybridity, and the bodily mash-up
• conjuring, the witch doctor and practitioners of the dark arts
• urban decay and environmentalism – climate crisis, toxicities, eco-gothic and natural disasters
• Afro-Gothic and new technologies, soundscapes, surveillance, cyber-haunting, ghost in
the machine
• menageries of the grotesque and public display of monstrosity

• cannibalization and ‘Eating the Other’
• sexual exploitation and gendered violence
• bondage, dungeons, incarcerations, and the restricted body

Essays must be written in English, but we encourage international submissions on all African Diasporic Afro-Gothic topics. Accepted works will be included in our proposal for a special issue of an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to black studies and aesthetics.

Please submit an abstract (300 words) along with a brief bio to afrogothiccfp@gmail.com.

The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2020.

Tashima Thomas, Editor Pratt Institute
Sybil Newton Cooksey, Editor New York University

CFP: “The ‘Long’ 18th Century” at Journal18/CAA2021

The “Long” 18th Century?

This issue of Journal18 takes off from the ubiquity of the phrase “the long nineteenth century.” Proliferating in calls for participation and panel descriptions–not to mention its prominent position in the description of this journal–if the mark of an elongated eighteenth century is inescapable, we propose that this terminology merits further scrutiny. What is meant by the “long” eighteenth century? From which vantage points, and for whom, is it long? And to what ends has this elongation been directed?

It is our contention that we must understand the rise of a “long” eighteenth century alongside the significant transformation of art historical inquiry into expanded geographical and cultural terrains. Since 2003, the study of eighteenth-century art has been enriched by a new commitment to “worlding,” even if decolonizing art histories remains an ongoing and incomplete project. As a result, habitual chronological slices, whether defined by European political history or by European stylistic shifts (e.g., Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassical), have been ripe for reconsideration as scholars have asked new questions about the transmission and sedimentation of practices, experiences, and art objects around the world. When the focus on histories of colonialism and slavery forces us to look anew at the bodies, lands, and knowledge presented in art, how do our narratives change and how do the sites and objects of our inquiry shift? What are the implications of this broadened scope of inquiry for habits of locution and the habits of mind that underwrite them? While the habitual slicing up of Britain’s eighteenth century to 1688–1815 is not that far out of alignment with France’s 1643–1815, it looks very different from the perspective of, for instance, South Asia, where an end point has tended rather to be located in the 1830s. What impact, if any, has a “worlding” of art history had upon our thinking about the relative length or shortness, narrowness or breadth, of the eighteenth century? What conceptually binds an eighteenth century once we have taken up the project of tracking the entanglements of art, commerce, and empire across worlds? For whom is the eighteenth century long, from what vantage points, whether local, regional, or transregional, and to what ends? And what relationship does this designation have to the equally omnipresent “long” nineteenth century, as well as to accounts of the Enlightenment, its seductions, and its repercussions?

We invite contributions that reflect upon a “long” and “broad” eighteenth century–its contours, analytic possibilities, and limits. We particularly welcome submissions that explore new models for tracking intellectual and artistic through-lines and inheritances, and that spur us to rethink periodization, or stylistic terminology that has been too often limited in its utility by being yoked to the goal of a successional narrative telos. Authors are encouraged to explore this wide-angle view by way of one term, one object, one phenomenon, or one margin. We welcome interventions that originate in art history or in other allied humanistic disciplines.

Issue Editors: Sarah Betzer, University of Virginia & Dipti Khera, New York University

Proposals for Journal18 issue #12 THE “LONG” 18TH CENTURY? are now being accepted.

To submit a proposal, send an abstract of 250 words (or 500 words for multi-authored proposals) and a brief biography to editor@journal18.org and sbetzer@virginia.edu.

Accepted participants will be invited to virtually convene for a panel in February 2021 under the auspices of the College Art Association annual conference for presentation and collaborative workshopping of their contributions.

Information on how to apply for CAA panel, sponsored by the American Society for 18th Century Studies, THE “LONG” 18TH CENTURY?:  https://caa.confex.com/caa/2021/webprogrampreliminary/meeting.html
Co-chairs: Sarah Betzer, University of Virginia and Dipti Khera, New York University
Email: sb4fg@virginia.edudipti.khera@nyu.edu

 

CFP: “No Template: Art and the Technicity of Race” [MEDIA-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus] (updated deadline for submissions Jul. 31, 2020)

Media-N CFP – No Template: Art and the Technicity of Race

UPDATED Deadline for submission of abstracts: July 31, 2020

A decade ago, Beth Coleman and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun introduced the concept of race and/as technology.* Turning to Heidegger’s notion of techne as prosthesis or skill, Coleman and Chun imagine race itself as a technology that can be leveraged, a tool for navigating systems of power. This distances race from its mythological status as biological fact, creating a critical framework that returns historical agency to the individual and helps us understand how race and ethnicity function in the visual–and technological–world.

Recently, the concept has received renewed attention as the intersections between race and ethnicity and the technological have come to the fore in popular discourse, raised by issues ranging from representation in film to bias in facial recognition. Critical work by scholars such as Simone Browne and Lisa Nakamura and the Precarity Lab has also continued to interrogate the technicity of race and its relationship to other technologies, both historical and contemporary. Artistic research and practice on the subject, however, has often been either neglected or instrumentalized as illustrative of a larger debate.

This special issue of Media-N responds to the urgent need to examine the state of dialogue on race and/as technology in art practice, history, and criticism. It will feature a ten years on reflection on the concept by Beth Coleman, opening discussion onto the way this framework has shaped, and has been shaped by, art of the past and present.

We seek contributions that explore how art sheds light not only on the relationship between race, ethnicity, and the technological, but on race itself as, in the words of Coleman, “a disruptive technology that changes the terms of engagement with an all-too-familiar system of representation and power” (178). Issues to consider include, but are certainly not limited to:

The impact of the race and/as technology hermeneutic on artistic research and practice of the past decade.

The influence of visual technologies and aesthetic practice on discourses surrounding sociohistorical concepts like blackness and brownness.

The imaging of historical and/or contemporary flows of migration and diaspora.

International communication media and tensions between the global/local.

The use of visual technologies to negotiate power between citizens and the state.

Light and color bias in the material/processes/procedures of photography, film, and digital media.

Bias and violence in both the inputs and outputs of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Anxieties about race and visual truth sparked by technologies ranging from DNA testing to deepfakes.

Ethnicity and surveillance capitalism after 9/11–and/or the long tail of surveillance capitalism inaugurated under trans-Atlantic slavery and European colonialism.

Submissions addressing artistic practices from any time period or region are welcomed from scholars, critics, artists, designers, scientists, media-makers, and interdisciplinary researchers from across the humanities and sciences.

*See Beth Coleman, “Race as Technology,” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies 24, no. 1 (70) (May 1, 2009): 176-207; and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, “Race and/as Technology, or How to Do Things to Race,” in Race After the Internet, eds. Lisa Nakamura, Peter Chow-White, and Alondra Nelson (New York: Routledge, 2012), 38-60.

=====
Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus (ISSN: 1942-017X) is a scholarly, invitational, and double blind peer-reviewed journal. The journal provides a forum for scholarly research, artworks and projects, and is open to submissions in the form of papers, reports, and reviews of exhibitions and books on new media art. Media-N is an English language journal, and all submissions must be received in English adhering to the standards set by the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

TIMELINE:
July 31, 2020: UPDATED Deadline for submission of abstracts.
August 1, 2020: Notification of accepted proposals and invitation to submit paper.
December 15, 2020: Projected deadline for submission of final papers.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES:
Please send your proposal by email with the following information combined into a single document:
-Proposal title, and a 300-500 word abstract, plus 1-2 images if desired.
-Please include your name, email, and title/affiliation on abstract.
-A condensed CV (no longer than 3 pages).
NOTE: Materials should be submitted in English, as a Word document or PDF.
File should not exceed 5MB.

SEND INQUIRIES & SUBMISSIONS TO:
Megan Driscoll, Special Issue Guest Editor: md@megandriscoll.net 
Johanna Gosse, Executive Editor: johannagosse@gmail.com

CFP: “Forum: Blind Spots” at Panorama

“Forum: Blind Spots” at Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Inspired by current efforts to reckon with ongoing, systemic racism, we invite proposals for a forum in Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art (Fall 2020) focused on blind spots, especially but not only related to race, that condition and constrain our research and writing. How might unexamined assumptions at the heart of our work in the academy and museum inadvertently perpetuate biases, stereotypes, and generalizations we mean to dismantle in and well beyond art history?

We welcome responses to that question, however uncomfortable, informed by critical race, postcolonial, feminist, queer, and Marxist perspectives, among others, and attentive to the social implications of our practice. To highlight how even revisionist projects can consolidate a monolithic model of subjectivity they aim to deconstruct, we encourage potential contributors to examine blind spots and their consequences in influential art historical projects and/or their own research. We envision a forum that represents a range of viable models for the kind of productive self-criticality for which the moment calls.

Panorama’s forums of this sort comprise “short polemical statements of about 500 to 1,500 words,” often in a personal voice, and related, whole or in part, to visual and material culture of the Americas (see journalpanorama.org). Please send your essay and curriculum vitae as a single pdf document to Anne Monahan and Isabel Taube (blindspot.panorama@gmail.com) by 15 August 2020; we will respond by 1 September 2020.

Questions?
Please contact us at blindspot.panorama@gmail.com.

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