CFP: Contribute to an Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture (proposals due Sept. 14, 2018)

Calls for Contributors: Book Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture

Deadline: September 14, 2018

 

The recent rise in problems of immigration and race are of long historical standing.  During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe, increased colonial expansion, industrialization, economic inequality, and nationalism severely tested the assumptions of a shared social fabric. In this, the visual arts performed a key function by amplifying or mitigating racial and ethnic difference. We are seeking proposals for essays that explore representations of race and folk within the context of the disciplines of ethnography and anthropology. The focus of the book will be to examine art’s role in forming social constructions about the interactions between white majority populations with minorities that are indigenous, migratory or nomadic, or relocated through colonization. Proposals are encouraged which look at understudied countries and challenge traditional assumptions, such as perceived homogenous populations (Scandinavia, for example) or those with diverse and shifting multi-ethnic groups, as in Central Europe and Russia. Of particular interest are topics that consider ambiguities and contradict assumptions of uniform binary relations: East-West fusions within racial origins, interracial marriages, fluctuating borders, and migratory populations.  One might consider the fact that the folk were valorized in definitions of national identity simultaneously with the marginalization of indigenous people through racist characterizations and ethnic categorizations.  So too, admiration for the primitive and the popularity of “exotic” people as entertainment co-existed with their denigration.

Proposals are welcome that apply themes from critical race theories, such as the definition of racial identity through social construction, evidence of microaggressions, and practices of essentializing ethnic groups rather than individuals.  How did countries that viewed themselves as progressive and inclusive deal with evidence that contradicted this?  In what ways did multi-ethnic regions foster a common culture while at the same time practicing biological or cultural racism? How did migratory folk populations disrupt conventional definitions of ethnic identity, which were based in part on geography? Proposals are also welcome that consider continuing echoes of these issues later in the twentieth-century; that look at ways in which marginalized minority groups used culture as a means to empower and define themselves; or that focus on the construction of white racial identity.

Proposals should be approximately 300 words and are due by September 14.

Send proposals and c.v. to: Marsha Morton, mortonmarsha10@gmail.com and Barbara Larson, blarson@uwf.edu

 

 

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PUB: E-Catalogue for Daylight Come… Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica — National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

For our latest exhibition Daylight Come… Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica (May 27 – July 29 2018) the National Gallery of Jamaica introduces it’s first e-catalogue. E-Catalogues will be created for select exhibitions and, while not as extensive as our print catalogues, will provide notable insight and information on their respective exhibitions, while being easily accessible to […]

via E-Catalogue for Daylight Come… Picturing Dunkley’s Jamaica — National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture”

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture.” Accepted papers will appear in a guest-edited section of Panorama issue 5.1 (May 2019).

Amateurism, as both a praxis and an attitude, has been a fundamental concept for the development and reception of American art. In the Colonial period, for instance, trained painters and self-taught limners alike were measured against Europe’s professional portraitists, and producers of decorative arts were often viewed as craftspeople or artisans rather than fine artists. And during the nineteenth century itinerant painters and so-called “folk artists” established careers that had little in common with those of artists now recognized as American masters, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church. At the same time, however, Americans (Benjamin Franklin, for example) have long admired the “Yankee ingenuity” and “useful knowledge” of self-starters and laypeople.

In the twentieth century amateurism emerged as an invaluable foil for American modernists: Robert Henri encouraged the painting of what one knows rather than what one learns; the regionalist artists disavowed the theoretical expertise of the Stieglitz Circle artists and writers; and the junk stylings of some Neo-Dadaists were complemented by their slapdash techniques and a casual disregard for “high art.” Snapshots, home movies, and hobby art are more obvious, though historically far less visible, examples of artforms that have been classified as amateur, and today, of course, DIY productions, both digital and analog, abound, and everyone with a smartphone is an accidental curator.

The various historical and contemporary categorizations of Native American visual culture are especially relevant to these themes. We know, for instance, that Abstract Expressionists borrowed from supposedly “primitive” artforms to heighten the aura of untutored amateurism around their works. But we also know that appropriation is just one context, and a flawed one at that, for analyzing Native American art, which for better and for worse, often finds itself at the crossroads of the vernacular and the institutional. And, of course, Native American artists have negotiated amateur and professional identities for their own purposes, in order to advance sovereignty, for example, or to participate in markets not entirely their own.

Refreshingly, scholars, curators, and publishers have begun to examine the art and visual culture of amateurism in recent years: there is the enduring appeal of the photographic snapshot and accompanying “snapshot aesthetic,” recent books and articles on amateur film, successful folk art exhibitions, and the National Gallery of Art’s current exhibition Outliers and American Vanguard Art. Nevertheless, the significance of the amateur-professional dialectic to American art requires more critical attention, and, at a time when the arts and humanities are subjected to more and more evaluative measures, the insouciance of amateur art seems more and more urgent.

Panorama seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words that take innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of amateur art and its material, historical, theoretical terrain. We encourage authors to consider the unique advantages of the journal’s online platform, which permits various digital enhancements, such as high-resolution images with zoom capabilities, the embedding of moving images and films, interactive maps, and the reconstruction of historical exhibitions, to name a few possibilities.

To propose a paper, please send a 500-word abstract and curriculum vitae to Justin Wolff: justin.wolff@maine.edu.

Deadline for proposals: May 15, 2018

Deadline for papers: December 31, 2018

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Papers: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama is a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to American art and visual culture in all media, from the colonial period to the present day. The journal provides a high-caliber international forum for disseminating original research and scholarship and for sustaining a lively engagement with intellectual developments and methodological debates in art history, visual and material cultural studies, museums, and curatorial work. It encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework and seeks to acknowledge in full work by African American, Asian American, Latinx, and Native American artists, makers, curators, art historians, and others engaged in visual cultural production in the United States.

Panorama welcomes submissions that utilize the insights of both traditional and new historical and interpretive approaches to art in the US in both local and global contexts. The editors seek submissions in various formats, including feature length articles (7,000-10,000 words), research notes (maximum of 2,500 words), book and exhibition reviews, and “Bully Pulpit” suggestions–texts that trace a conversation or debate on a topic that is of general interest to the field.

For more information, see: http://journalpanorama.org/submissions/

RFP: Seeking author for Kara Walker essay

Drs. Deborah Johnson and Wendy Oliver, editors of Women Making Art, Women in the Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts since 1960, are searching for additional authors for an updated second edition of the volume. Specifically, we are looking for a scholar interested in contributing a chapter on Kara Walker.

The essay should be roughly 6,000-8,000 words, notes and references included, with a focus on one paradigmatic image (or series) within Walker’s work. The author should be prepared to engage formal analysis, race and gender theory, and biography.

If interested — or with questions — please contact doctorj@providence.edu

Roma and African Americans share a common struggle, say Cornel West and Margarete Matache

Cornel West has co-authored an article with Margareta Matache, a Roma rights activist and scholar: it was published in The Guardian last Tuesday. As is always the case with Guardian comments, these are as illuminating to read as the article itself. So are the silences of removed and presumably wack comments: there must be at least a half dozen iterations of “This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards.”

It’s been 25 years since West’s Race Matters was first published in 1998; a new edition with a forward by West. In a new introduction for this anniversary edition, West writes: “Race matters in the twenty-first century are part of a moral and spiritual war over resources, power, souls, and sensibilities.” The introductory chapter focuses on US history–distant and past–and the shout outs are issued mostly to US-based academics and activists. Yet as he has for the last decades, West makes his target imperialism which is phenomenon worked out in a number of national varieties. It’s no doubt useful to call out imperialism in the name of anti-racism: West writes that “[r]ace matters are an integral part–though not sole part–of empire matters” and that “imperial democracy has its own structures of domination.”

A decisive turn to critical race art history in Europe was evident in Saturday’s College Art Association conference panel, “Critical Race Art Histories in German, Scandinavia, and Central Europe,” sponsored by the Historian of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art and Architecture, which, like ACRAH, is a CAA Affiliated Society.

 

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 4.41.46 PM

A page from Herman Lundborg’s The Swedish Nation and Racial Types (1921), posted at Anthroscape.

This constellation of images is interesting not only because of the project to illustrate perceived mixed race and mixed ethnic appearances, Casta painting-like, but also because some subjects were presented frontally and in profile while others are not. Is “gipsy-ness” obvious enough in the top right frontal portrait? We can head back to Allan Sekula’s “The Body and the Archive” , an examination of the taxonomic photo. Yet, there was something else happening in the many nineteenth- and twetienth-century drawings and prints. (A Google Image search will yield a good number of these representations.) Seems like many Western artists chose the 3/4 profile view to demonstrate ethno-racial particularity. Why? One ear tells all? The shadow on one cheek is more than enough?

Job Opportunity: Senior Digital Content Manager, Whitney Museum of American Art (Apply by Jan. 12, 2018)

The Senior Digital Content Manager at the Whitney Museum of American Art oversees the design, development and implementation of content strategies for the Museum’s digital platforms. The role is managerial and editorial in nature and develops digital project briefs and requirements, oversees content generation, and coordinates both internal and external production teams. The position’s primary objective is to use digital initiatives to increase engagement, both online and onsite, with the Whitney’s programming, mission and brand. As the lead liaison with Museum stakeholders, the role requires exceptional project management, storytelling, editorial, and digital experience-design skills.

 

 Responsibilities

  • Strategize and develop content across the Museum’s digital platforms.
  • Establish and maintain best practices for publishing on whitney.org, as well as other digital platforms, ensuring optimal usability, accessibility, and a consistent institutional voice across media.
  • Serve as editor for web copy, including website nomenclature, and exhibition and institutional announcements.
  • Serve as the primary project manager for all high-profile digital initiatives working closely with stakeholders throughout the Museum.
  • Oversee the development of digital requirement briefs, and manage budgets and timelines.
  • Oversee the production of video and audio content, ensuring a polished, consistent product; working with stakeholders to ensure success of livestreams of programs and events.
  • Produce institutional storytelling products, including the Whitney Stories series: conduct interviews, manage the editorial process, gather assets, and supervise outside contractors.
  • Oversee the Museum’s digital signage system and manage related contractor relationships.
  • Together with the Museum’s Digital Producer, manage website content via the Museum’s content management system, proofing and editing text for proper grammar and institutional style, and coordinating content with stakeholders throughout the Museum.
  • Work with Rights and Reproductions manager to obtain images and rights for content development and media production, as needed.

 

Requirements:

  • B.A.
  • 3–5 years professional digital content management or production experience.
  • Exceptional storytelling and production skills across media and platforms.
  • Strong background in planning and execution of media and technology initiatives, design thinking a plus.
  • Strong editorial skills, with a keen eye for consistency, accuracy, and detail.
  • Strong interpersonal skills and professional maturity in working with internal clients in a museum environment; ability and desire to communicate clearly about digital initiatives with non-technical staff.

 

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:  hr@whitney.org and write “Senior Digital Content Manager” in the subject line.  Deadline for submission is January 12, 2018.

 

 

About the Whitney:

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for 86 years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The Museum does not discriminate because of age, sex, religion, race, color, creed, national origin, alienage or citizenship, disability, marital status, partnership status, veteran status, gender (including gender identity), sexual orientation, or any other factor prohibited by law. The Museum hires and promotes individuals solely on the basis of their qualifications for the job to be filled. The Museum encourages all qualified candidates to apply for vacant positions at all levels. This description shall not be construed as a contract of any sort for a specific period of employment.

Two new titles–African-American Art History

From Phoebe Wolfskill (Indiana Univ.), two new titles:

James Romaine and Phoebe Wolfskill, eds., Beholding Christ and Christianity in African American Art (Pennsylvania State Press, 2017)
https://www.psupress.org/books/titles/978-0-271-07774-1.html

and

Phoebe Wolfskill, Archibald Motley Jr. and Racial Reinvention: The Old Negro in New Negro Art (University of Illinois Press, 2017)
http://go.illinois.edu/f17wolfskill

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REV: The changing focus of black artists

Tonya Nelson examines the changing responses of black artists to racism since the Civil Rights Era

via From denouncing racism to destabilising systems: the changing focus of black artists — Media Diversified

2017 Terra Publication Grant Applications due Sept. 15

Letters of Inquiry for Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grants are due September 15.

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant supports book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that are under contract with a publisher. For this grant program, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States. Awards of up to $15,000 will be made in three distinct categories:

  • Grants to US publishers for manuscripts considering American art in an international context
  • Grants to non-US publishers for manuscripts on topics in American art
  • Grants for the translation of books on topics in American art to or from English.

Applicants must submit a letter of inquiry by September 15, 2017. The deadline for the receipt of completed applications is December 15, 2017.

For more information, please visit the College Art Association website, where you will find application guidelines and the application process, schedule, and checklist, or contact CAA Editorial Manager Sarah Zabrodski at szabrodski@collegeart.org or +1 212-392-4424.
Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 501914–15. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61

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