Call for Applications, 2022-2023: The Tyson Scholars of American Art Program at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

The Tyson Scholars of American Art Program encourages and supports full-time interdisciplinary scholarship that seeks to expand boundaries and traditional categories of investigation into American art and visual and material culture from the colonial period to the present. The program was established in 2012 through a $5 million commitment from the Tyson family and Tyson Foods, Inc. Since its inception, the Tyson Scholars Program has supported the work of 57 scholars, attracting academic professionals in a variety of disciplines nationally and internationally.

Crystal Bridges and the Tyson Scholars Program invites PhD candidates (or equivalent), post-doctoral researchers, and senior scholars from any field who are researching American art to apply. Scholars may be focused on architecture, craft, material culture, performance art, and new media. We also invite applications from scholars approaching US art transregionally and looking at the broader geographical context of the Americas, especially including Latinx and Indigenous art. Applications will be evaluated on the originality and quality of the proposed research project and its contribution to a more equitable and inclusive history of American art.

The Tyson Scholars Program looks for research projects that will intersect meaningfully with the museum’s collections, library resources, architecture, grounds, curatorial expertise, programs and exhibitions; and/or the University of Arkansas faculty broadly; and applicants should speak to why residence in Northwest Arkansas and the surrounding areas will advance their work. The applicant’s academic standing, scholarly qualifications, and experience will be considered, as it informs the ability of the applicant to complete the proposed project. Letters of support are strongest when they demonstrate the applicant’s excellence, promise, originality, track record, and productivity as a scholar, not when the letter contains a commentary on the project.

Crystal Bridges is dedicated to an equitable, inclusive, and diverse cohort of fellows. We seek applicants who bring a critical perspective and understanding of the experiences of groups historically underrepresented in American art, and welcome applications from qualified persons of color; who are Indigenous; with disabilities; who are LGBTQ; first-generation college graduates; from low-income households; and who are veterans.

Fellowships are residential and support full-time writing and research for terms that range from six weeks to nine months. While in residence, Tyson Scholars have access to the art and library collections of Crystal Bridges as well as the library and archives at the University of Arkansas in nearby Fayetteville. Stipends vary depending on the duration of residency, position as senior scholar, post-doctoral scholar or pre-doctoral scholar, and range from $17,000 to $34,000 per semester, plus provided housing. The residency includes $1,500 for relocation, and additional research funds upon application. Scholars are provided workspace in the curatorial wing of the Crystal Bridges Library. The workspace is an enclosed area shared with other Tyson Scholars. Scholars are provided with basic office supplies, desk space, an office chair, space on a bookshelf, and a locking cabinet with key for personal belongings and files. Housing is provided within walking distance of the museum.

Further information about the Tyson Scholars Program, application instructions, and application portal can be found at https://crystalbridges.org/reports-and-research/tyson-scholars/. Applications for the 2022-2023 academic year open November 1, 2021 and close January 14, 2022.

About Crystal Bridges:
As Crystal Bridges and the Momentary, we recognize our role as settlers and guests in the Northwest Arkansas region. We acknowledge the Caddo, Quapaw, and Osage as well as the many Indigenous caretakers of this land and water. We appreciate the enduring influence of the vibrant, diverse, and contemporary cultures of Indigenous peoples. We are conscious of the role in colonization that museums have played. As cultural institutions, we have a responsibility to engage in the dismantling of historical and systemic invisibility of Indigenous peoples past, present, and future. We choose to intentionally hold ourselves accountable to appropriate conversation, representation, connection, and education to facilitate a space of measurable change.

The mission of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is to welcome all to celebrate the American spirit in a setting that unites the power of art with the beauty of nature. Since opening in 2011, Crystal Bridges has welcomed 5.6 million visitors to the museum, with no cost for admission. Crystal Bridges was founded in 2005 as a non-profit charitable organization by philanthropist and chair of the museum’s board of directors, Alice Walton. The museum is nestled on 120 acres of Ozark landscape and was designed by world-renowned architect Moshe Safdie. A rare Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house was preserved and relocated to the museum grounds in 2015. Crystal Bridges offers public programs including lectures, performances, classes, and teacher development opportunities. Some 300,000 school children have participated in the Willard and Pat Walker School Visit program, which provides educational experiences for school groups at no cost to the schools. Additional museum amenities include a restaurant, gift store, library, and over five miles of walking/biking trails, as well as outdoor art installations. Through the Tyson Scholars of American Art program, Crystal Bridges encourages and supports pre-doctoral and post-doctoral research that seek to expand boundaries of American art.

On February 22, 2020 Crystal Bridges opened the Momentary, a contemporary art satellite space highlighting today’s visual, performing, and culinary arts. The Momentary champions contemporary art’s role in everyday life and supports an artist-in-residence program.

Crystal Bridges’ collection spans five centuries of American masterworks from early American to current day and is enhanced by temporary exhibitions. The collection development focuses on artwork that expands American art, including artwork by artists with diverse backgrounds, working in a wide range of media. Special interests include craft, Native American art, and art that addresses multiple perspectives and stories. The collection is available online at CrystalBridges.org/art-galleries. Crystal Bridges’ research library consists of approximately 60,000 volumes as well as significant manuscript and ephemera holdings. The Crystal Bridges Library ibrary also houses a comprehensive collection of American color-plate books from the nineteenth century.

JOB: Adjunct Faculty in Liberal Arts-Art History @ Cleveland Institute of Art

The Cleveland Institute of Art seeks qualified applicants for Adjunct Faculty positions in Liberal Arts – Art History for the following courses:

Critical Issues in Visual Culture 

This discussion-style course will introduce students to the following: critical theories and methods of analysis for interpreting modern and contemporary visual art and cultured major themes in visual culture, including trends and issues specific to design.

Themes and Movements in Art and Design History

This course examines significant developments and themes in art and design history from the pre-modern through modern periods.  While selected movements, chronologies, and works from standard surveys of art history will be touched upon where pertinent, the course will take varied approaches to overarching debates, narratives, and theories: e.g., the persistence of classicism and its continued symbolic meaning in art, architecture, and the city; and the representation of the body since antiquity; and social and political identity and visual expression. 

Minimum qualifications include a master’s degree in art history or a related field or equivalent professional experience. Adjunct faculty are not eligible for benefits. Adjunct faculty are limited to a maximum of four teaching assignments per academic year. In-person teaching is required for the spring semester.

Compensation is commensurate with experience. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest summarizing qualifications, CV, and a list of 3 references.

The positions will begin in January 2022. Application reviews will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Background check authorizations will be required for finalists.

Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) is committed to increasing diversity in our community and actively pursues individuals from all backgrounds. Additionally, CIA complies with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and provides equal opportunity in all educational programs and activities, admission of students, and conditions of employment for all qualified individuals regardless of race, color, sex, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, protected veteran status, gender identity or national origin.

ABOUT CIA

The Cleveland Institute of Art is one of the nation’s leading accredited independent colleges of art and design. Since 1882, the College has been an educational cornerstone in Cleveland, Ohio, producing graduates competitive as studio artists, designers, photographers, contemporary craftsmen, and educators.

With approximately 600 students, CIA offers a personal educational experience with the benefits of a larger institution. Students choose from 15 majors and live and work in Cleveland’s University Circle, one of the country’s most unique cultural centers—recently named by Forbes Magazine as one of the 10 prettiest communities in the country.

To apply go to https://www.cia.edu/about-us/careers-at-cia

JOB: Asst Prof, Modern and Contemporary art @ Cleveland Institute of Art

The Liberal Arts Department at the Cleveland Institute of Art invites applications for a full-time faculty position at the rank of Assistant Professor in modern and contemporary art history, beginning in July 2022. The successful candidate will teach three courses each semester, maintain an active record of scholarship and other professional activity, and contribute to departmental and institutional service. Teaching assignments will include introductory courses in Visual Culture and Art History, covering themes from ancient times to the present day, and elective courses in the history of modern and contemporary art, craft, design, and/or media arts.

We seek candidates whose teaching and scholarship focuses on modern and contemporary art and includes expertise in critical theory and the study of visual culture. An ideal candidate will also have familiarity with cross-cultural perspectives, non-western art history, and one or more of the following:

  • Design as a cross-disciplinary, contemporary practice;
  • Moving image and interactive digital media, such as video, gaming, and animation;
  • Performance art, conceptual art, or socially-engaged practice; or
  • Issues of ecology and sustainability in modern and contemporary art.

We especially welcome candidates whose instructional approaches extend beyond Eurocentric models and engage with contemporary issues in art, craft, and media arts. The position offers competitive salary and benefits. Preferred qualifications include a Ph.D. in Art History or a closely related field, an active record of publication, experience teaching at the college level, and a record of supporting diversity, equity, and inclusion in the classroom and professional practice.

Applications received by Dec 29, 2021 will be given full consideration. To apply for the position, please visit https://www.cia.edu/about-us/careers-at-cia. Applicants will be asked to submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching statement, sample of scholarly work, and contact information for three references. Semi-finalist candidates will be interviewed by phone or video conference. Three letters of recommendation will be required for candidates who progress. Finalists will be interviewed in spring 2022 through video conferences and/or campus visits. Candidates must be eligible to work in the United States on or before July 1, 2022. 

Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) is committed to increasing diversity in our community and actively pursues individuals from all backgrounds. Additionally, CIA complies with all applicable federal, state, and local laws and provides equal opportunity in all educational programs and activities, admission of students, and conditions of employment for all qualified individuals regardless of race, color, sex, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, protected veteran status, gender identity or national origin.

ABOUT CIA

The Cleveland Institute of Art is a nationally recognized four-year accredited college of art and design. An educational cornerstone in Cleveland since 1882, CIA is an independent college committed to leadership and vision in all forms of visual arts education. CIA wins widespread acclaim for the quality of its programs and the achievements of its alumni. Groundbreaking artwork from graduates and faculty can be found in the permanent collections of prestigious museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and the Victoria and Albert Museum. The college’s design and entertainment arts alumni are sought-after innovators at corporations that include Proctor & Gamble, Ford, GM, Nissan, Motor, Hasbro, Disney, Nickelodeon, Sony and Electronic Arts.

With approximately 600 students, CIA offers a personal educational experience with the benefits of a larger institution. Students choose from 15 majors and live and work in Cleveland’s University Circle, one of the country’s most unique cultural centers – recently named by Forbes Magazine as one of the ten prettiest communities in the country. The CIA experience includes cross-disciplinary studies, opportunities for exploration, development of critical thinking and practical business skills. In addition, every CIA student participates in projects involving real-world challenges and outside clients or partners. CIA’s highly engaged faculty include exhibiting artists, scholars, and award-winning designers who continue to make significant contributions to their fields and win national recognition for their art and scholarship.

JOB: African Art @ FIT

Dear colleagues,

At the Fashion Institute of Technology (NYC), we unexpectedly need to find an instructor for the African art survey classes we are offering in Spring 2022.  These are in-person courses that run from January 24-May 16:

HA 223 — African Art and Civilization – Mondays @ 12:10-3pm

Surveys cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. Illustrated lectures present art and architecture in relation to history, religion, economic conditions, and social and political structures.

HA 230 — Modern and Contemporary African Art – Tuesdays @ 6:30-9:20pm

An examination of the history of 20th- and 21st-century African art, from decolonialization movements through contemporary themes. Surveys new artistic practices, schools, and workshops within their historical and artistic contexts.

Pay is dependent on experience, but the base rate is $72.08 an hour.  We can recommend step-level increases for teaching experience and for professional activities. A class is three hours for 15 weeks, with an extra week of pay to cover office hours, so 48 hours.  It works out to be about a minimum $3500, if higher steps are awarded then the base rate is higher. Classes are capped at 27, and we expect to have a renegotiated contract by spring, with wages 7% higher. Our adjunct faculty have the opportunity to join our union, the UCE-FIT which provides a variety of benefits.

Please alert your colleagues and send me a CV if you are interested. Thank you!

All the best,

Justine De Young, Chair, History of Art Department, Fashion Institute of Technology
justine_deyoung@fitnyc.edu

JOB: Tenure Track, Arts of the Americas @ U Arkansas

The Art History Program in the School of Art at the University of Arkansas invites applications for a tenure-track endowed assistant or associate professor in art history, in research areas integral to the arts of the Americas. The position is open in terms of chronological specialization, and we are especially interested in scholars of Indigenous art, Latin American and Latinx modern and contemporary art. Interdisciplinary, intersectional, and transregional approaches centering overlooked or marginalized histories are particularly welcome, such as Afro-Latinx traditions and histories of craft.

Scholars with a passion for collaboration, program-building, and partnership-development are also encouraged to apply. Applications are also encouraged from those invested in making art history accessible and compelling to first-generation students and students from communities underrepresented in U.S. arts institutions. The Art History Program in the School of Art is actively committed to diversifying art historical knowledge and approaches, embracing new methodologies, and educating students in a multivocal and inclusive art history. This effort is reinforced by several new initiatives within the School of Art, including a partnership with the IDEALS Institute, which offers workshops and opportunities for organizational learning; the Bridges Program, which provides structural support to all new faculty, especially those historically underrepresented in academia and their chosen fields; and a new student mentoring program.

This position is considered fundamental to the implementation of a new MA program in the arts of the Americas, developed in partnership with the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art and its contemporary arts satellite, the Momentary. For this and future hires, we seek creative thinkers who will contribute to the diversity and excellence of the intellectual community in the School of Art, Crystal Bridges, and the growing arts ecosystem of Northwest Arkansas. Endowed positions come with a significant annual research budget, the expectation of a research record appropriate to the prominence of the appointment, and the requirement of at least one community outreach effort per year. This is a nine-month faculty appointment, with a standard workload of 40% research, 40% teaching (2 courses per semester), and 20% service. Expected start date is August 15, 2022.

The successful candidates will teach courses at the graduate and undergraduate level, play an active role in implementing the new MA program in arts of the Americas (expected launch date of Fall 2023), participate in and help to guide future faculty searches, and regularly collaborate with staff at Crystal Bridges and the Momentary. Candidates may also teach in the Honors College and at the university’s Rome Center, and co-design courses with colleagues in Studio and other units. Art history faculty have ties to the Indigenous Studies Program, Latin American and Latino Studies, and African and African American Studies, among other departments and initiatives. Additional resources include the Arkansas Archaeological Survey, the Fine Arts Center Gallery, the Museum of Native American History in Bentonville, and the many museums in the region, including the First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City, OK, the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, OK, and the Nelson-Atkins Museum in Kansas City, MO.

Applications due by December 1, 2021. Late applications will be reviewed as necessary to fill the position.

Further details here: uasys.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/UASYS

CFP: Black and Queer, Music on Screen, liquid blackness

liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies 7, no. 1, Spring 2023

Co-edited by Ïxkári Estelle, James Tobias (Sync: Stylistics of Hieroglyphic Time), Stefan Torralba, and Calvin Warren (Ontological Terror: Blackness, Nihilism, Emancipation)

This special issue of liquid blackness: journal of aesthetics and black studies proposes to work on Black Queer expression in audiovisual musics cutting across histories of the avant-garde, popular audiovisuality, and frameworks both transnational and critically transhistorical. The goal of the issue is to set up the framework for a survey of Black and Queer musicality in audiovisual media so as to suggest “non-contemporaneous” dialogues between and across historical registers and media platforms, so that the critical expressive power of non-conforming persons of color become a given rather than an alibi, an absence, or a projection.

From early sound cinema to the present, queer or gender non-conforming black artists have voiced a complex series of claims, propositions, demands, and desires, from the introduction of sound to the cinematic screen to the introduction of social media video in networked digital cultures. Black feminist and queer scholarship has often engaged with the meanings and powers expressed in these works, or in musical artists indebted to them or referencing them, from Angela Davis’ reading of transformations of historical memory in Smith’s St. Louis Blues (Blues Legacies and Black Feminisms), to Lindon Barrett’s study of Billie Holiday (Blackness and Value), to Saidiya Hartman’s discussion of errancy in relation to woman-identified women singers in the early years of recording (Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments), and DaphneBrooks’ recent reading of black women’s use of arrangement, sonic curation, and blackness as technology (Liner Notes for the Revolution) in articulating a politics of being and becoming. Working through postcolonial, decolonial, diasporic, and critical ethnic studies’ critical innovations, we may productively identify discontinuities in terms of technical medium and mode of distribution, from film short, to soundie, to Hollywood musical set piece, to film promotional clips, music television clips, and music video made for social media. At the same time, we will also observe the ways in which concepts like Sharpe’s “wake work,” “fugitivity” in Moten’s critical aesthetics, “opacity” in Fleetwood, Browne, or Musser, “boiz” or non-normative sex-gender identities in Harris, the expressive technics of “queer OS” in Keeling, or “ontological terror” in Warren – only a few of potentially generative formulations appearing in recent Black Study – may help gloss the gestures, meanings, and forces at work in black queer voice in technical mediation. How may we read the histories and futures of audiovisual musicality in these terms, given the dynamic work of artists over the last decade ranging from, say, Zebra Katz to Janelle Monae, Odd Future et. al., Mykki Blanco, Moses Sumney – and many more, too numerous to list here?


Black and Queer, Music on Screen seeks to redress a grave limitation in current scholarship. Typically, attention to medium and historical specificities in studies of onscreen musicality have so prioritized the form/medium problem in cinema, video, or digital media studies, such that attention to “film,” “video,” or “digital” formats pre-empts the observation of continuities or conversations across historical periods or transitioning media. One result is that even as black and sex-gender non-confirming subjects are “rediscovered” in “early sound film,” black and sex- gender non-confirming innovations in later moments and in the contemporary moment are cordoned off from one another, safely consigned to some futural fate of what will be a belated rediscovery, or held apart as “alternatives” to the dominant rather than continuing a long- standing historical critique.

While the disciplinary preoccupations of cinema and media studies with regard to medium specificity and period have made it unlikely that concerns and problems expressed in the technical mediation of Black Queer voice as musical expression to surface as primary problems in cinema and media studies, nevertheless, some of the most affecting and influential works of artist cinema – Julien’s Looking for Langston, for example – have clearly problematized and made substance of these aesthetic and political histories, as well as their deferral in the culture industries and in the academy alike. This special issue calls for critical work centering both historical and recent upsurges in the aesthetic and critical powers of Black and Queer musical expression on screen. What happens when we understand, as Bey (2020) has argued, “the history of blackness as a history of disruption,” so that disrupting racializations along with sex-gender non-conformance become productive of the labor animating audiovisual music’s meaning and effects?

Finally, we ask, what does the sound, voice, or gesture of radical ethical demand feel like when it hits the poetics and aesthetics of the musical screen? What revolutions, in other words, in retrospect and in theory, can we understand to have in fact been sung, danced, and thus enjoined once we align the relevant critical frameworks and exemplars, so that the limits and obstacles to a larger historical and theoretical understanding of expressive queer black gesture are removed?

Topics List
• Black queer practices of exceeding and disabling technology in the form of musical, audiovisual technics• Archival recovery, fictive archiving, and critical fabulation of the archive through voice, sound, music, and musical audiovisuality• Hemispheric and triangular kinships of Black queer media as musical counter-positions within the Americas• Productivities and problematics of Black queer practices enabling “queer of color” expression• The politics of citation, reference, and allusion in Black queer musical media practices• Transmedia musical imaginaries, ethics, and aesthetics• Surprising transnational circuits of visual imageries and performance practices, that is, audiovisual treatments of the Black Atlantic or the Black Pacific• Musicality, voice, and sound informing counterintuitive or counterhegemonic readings of popular Back queer media• Digitality, diaspora, musicality• Soul as reason: re-thinking the place of affect as paralinguistic rhetoric of critique, community, or desire • “Dirty” computing, musical freakdom, and the gestural paragrammatics of collective self- fashioning• Musicality and remembrance as transformation of collective memory, in Black musical film more generally, in addition to Blues women’s recordings.• Afro-Historicisms, Afro-Futurisms, or Afro-Pessimisms on the musical screen• Shouts and whispers on screen: historical claims and rhetorics in Black audiovision• Cool, hot, noise: style on the musical screen• Analytics of track, mix, and edit on screen as homologies of self-fashioning and collective movement• Ad hoc surrealisms, absurdisms, anti-realisms: musicality as fugitivity• Generational non-contemporaneity: Black voice carrying over and beyond period and across medium 

Submission Due: January 15, 2022 (send to journalsubmissions@liquidblackness.com)

Author Guidelines & Submission Information• Submission Types:• Traditional essays: approx. 3-5,000 words (including footnotes)—all essays should be accompanied by at least one image• We welcome submissions of interviews, visual and textual art, video, and other artistic work• Questions about the length, style, format of experimental submissions can be directed to journalsubmissions@liquidblackness.com• liquid blackness follows the formatting and reference guidelines stipulated by The Chicago Manual of Style• All submissions, solicited and unsolicited, will be peer-reviewed• Media Specifications• We welcome the submission of media files such as video or sound clips, which will be published as supplementary data. The following audio and video file types are acceptable as supplementary data files and supported by our online platform:.mp3, .mp4, .wav, .wma, .au, .m4a, .mpg, .mpeg, .mov, .avi, .wmv., html.• Executable files (.exe) are not acceptable.• There is no restriction on the number of files per article or on the size of files; however, please keep in mind that very large files may be problematic for readers with slow connection speeds.• Please ensure that each video or audio clip is called out in the text of the article, much like how a figure or table is called out: e.g., “see supplementary audio file 1.”

—About liquid blackness
• liquid blackness is an open-access journal, which means that all content is freely available without charge to readers or their institutions.• Our Editorial and Advisory Boards 

Mission Statement
The liquid blackness journal seeks to carve out a place for aesthetic theory and the most radical agenda of Black Studies to come together in productive ways, with a double goal: to fully attend to the aesthetic work of blackness and to the political work of form. In this way, the journal strives to develop innovative approaches and analytic tools to address points ofconvergence between the exigencies of black life and the many slippery ways in which blackness is encountered in contemporary sonic and visual culture.

liquid blackness aims to establish a point of exchange at the intersection of multiple fields. The history of this intentionally undisciplined space is best understood through a series of questions pivoting around (1) the relationship between aesthetics and the ontology of blackness and (2) the generative potential of blackness as an aesthetic. If blackness is, as we argue after Fred Moten, an unregulated generative force, then the liquid blackness journal seeks to offer a dedicated space where it can be consistently unleashed. As we extend and confront lines of inquiry from a number of research fields, our approach is equally concerned with theoretical content, analytical methods, and scholarly praxis.

JOB: Asst Prof African American / African Diaspora Arts @ NYU

Description 

The Department of Art History at New York University seeks applications for a full-time, tenure-track, Assistant Professorship in African American or African Diasporic arts. We invite applicants working in any period and on any area, broadly understood, of visual arts, material cultures, and/or the built environment. Scholars who focus on interhemispheric and global connections are especially welcome to apply. Additionally, evidence of a commitment to advancing equity and inclusion through research, teaching, and/or service will be valued.

The position carries with it an associate appointment at the Institute of Fine Arts. The appointee will teach four courses each academic year: three undergraduate courses in the College of Arts and Science (consisting of a mix of core curriculum courses, departmental surveys, and advanced courses) in the candidate’s area(s) of specialization, and one graduate course at the Institute of Fine Arts. The candidate will supervise undergraduate independent studies and honors theses, and, at the IFA, masters theses and doctoral dissertations.

This position is part of a multi-departmental cluster hire in Black Diaspora Cultural Studies that includes the NYU Arts & Science departments of History and Politics and NYU Gallatin and which may expand to other departments in future years. A primary aim of the cluster is to build a network for scholars working in these areas to collaborate across NYU. More information about this cluster can be found here, along with background about NYU’s broader Faculty Cluster Hiring Initiative.

The appointment will begin on September 1, 2022, subject to budgetary and administrative approval.

Qualifications

Candidates must have completed the Ph.D. by September 1, 2022. Successful candidates will demonstrate excellence in scholarship and teaching. 

Application Instructions

Application deadline is November 30, 2021. To apply, please go to http://apply.interfolio.com/96774

and submit a letter of application (addressed to Prof. Prita Meier, Search Committee Chair), CV, statement of research interest and goals, statement of teaching, and a list of three referees. Diversity is an important part of the NYU mission; in your application letter briefly describe how diversity is part of your pedagogy and, if applicable, research. Information about NYU diversity and inclusion statements may be found at  http://as.nyu.edu/departments/facultydiversity/recruitment/diversity-statements.html.

The Faculty of Arts and Science at NYU is at the heart of a leading research university that spans the globe. We seek scholars of the highest caliber that embody the diversity of the United States as well as the global society in which we live. We strongly encourage applications from women, racial and ethnic minorities, and other individuals who are under-represented in the profession, across color, creed, race, ethnic and national origin, physical ability, gender and sexual identity, or any other legally protected basis. NYU affirms the value of differing perspectives on the world as we strive to build the strongest possible university with the widest reach. To learn more about the FAS commitment to diversity, equality and inclusion, please read here http://as.nyu.edu/departments/facultydiversity.html).

EOE/Affirmative Action/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled/Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity.  

JOB: Developmental editors for professional development program, Toward Equity in Publishing

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is accepting  bids to contract developmental editors for Toward Equity in Publishing (TEP), the professional development program launched by the journal American Art and supported by a grant from the Dedalus Foundation. The position entails providing developmental and line editing to TEP author-participants. Each editor will assist 2–4 TEP author-participants, providing up to 40 hours of service to each, not to exceed 160 hours per year. The number of author-participants assigned to each editor will depend on how many developmental editors are contracted by the Smithsonian. Work will commence on or after February 1, 2022, with a possibility to extend for a total of 28 months, depending on satisfactory performance and availability of funds. The closing date for contract bids is November 15, 2021.

To receive the Request for Quotes, Statement of Work, and instructions for submitting the bid, please write to AmericanArtJournal@si.edu.

Prospective contractors are strongly encouraged to enroll in the federal System for Award Management (SAM). The contract cannot be made prior to evidence of the contractor’s active and valid registration in the “all awards” category of SAM.

For further details, please contact the executive editor, Robin Veder, at AmericanArtJournal@si.edu, with your surname and the header “TEP Developmental Editor” in the subject line.

JOB: Adjunct, African or African American @ Brandeis

https://brandeis.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/Jobs/job/Brandeis—Waltham-Campus/Lecturer-in-Fine-Arts_R0005037

Brandeis University invites applications for an Adjunct Instructor to teach one introductory survey course in History of African Art or History of African American Art in the Spring 2022 (Jan – May). Either course serves majors in Fine Arts, Art History, and African and African American Studies, as well as students at all levels from across all disciplines in the university. Though offered in the past, we encourage the instructor to design the course as they see fit. Course meets for three hours a week and can be offered remotely. There is some flexibility to the schedule. Applicants should be ABD or PhD in Art History or Black Studies with expertise in African/African American art.

Candidates must submit a letter of interest (2 pages maximum), curriculum vitae, one page teaching statement, sample syllabus for an introductory level History of African Art/African American Art course, and contact information for three references.

Duties and Responsibilities

Adjunct Faculty duties and responsibilities include but are not limited to:

1. providing instruction in accordance with established curriculum, course outlines and class schedules

2. encouraging and maintaining an environment which emphasizes learning, encouraging free discussion of ideas and critical thinking

3. evaluating progress of students concerning educational matters and grading student work

4. meeting with students during office hours maintaining appropriate standards of professional conduct and ethics

5. maintaining current knowledge in the subject matter areas

6. maintaining accurate academic records

7. fulfilling professional responsibilities of a part-time/temporary faculty member

8. maintaining accurate academic records

9. performing other related duties as assigned

This appointment is to a position that is in a collective bargaining unit represented by SEIU Local 509.

Closing Statement

Brandeis University is committed to providing its students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working and where all people are treated with respect and dignity. We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, ancestry, national origin, ethnicity, caste, sex, pregnancy, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, including transgender identity, religion, disability, age, genetics, active military or veteran status and any other characteristics protected under applicable federal or Massachusetts law.

JOB: Asst Prof @ Johns Hopkins

The Department of the History of Art at Johns Hopkins University invites applications for two tenure-track Assistant Professor appointments in Modern Art and Architectural History and Theory. We welcome scholars of the long twentieth century who pursue a critically inflected approach to the period’s global interconnections and engage with the philosophical and historical constructions of and challenges to modernism.

This search will result in two appointments. One will be a specialist in East and/or Southeast Asian modern art, including transnational and Asian American art history. One will be a specialist in any area of modernism, including transnational and diasporic art and architecture.

PhD in the History of Art or related discipline required at time of appointment. Candidates must demonstrate a strong research profile and a commitment to teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Candidates should submit a letter of application, a current CV, one article- or chapter-length sample of scholarly writing (published or in press), and three letters of reference. Applicants should state in their cover letter how, through their research approaches, teaching methodology, and/or public engagement, they can contribute to the university’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. All materials will be submitted online at https://apply.interfolio.com/97142. Review of applications will begin November 21, 2021. For more information about the department, visit http://arthist.jhu.edu. Johns Hopkins is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunities Employer and is committed to increasing the diversity of its faculty. It welcomes nominations of, and applications from, women and members of minority groups, as well as others who would bring additional dimensions to the university’s research and teaching missions.