CFP: Materializing Race: An ‘Unconference’ via Zoom

Do you study material culture in the Americas before 1830 or know someone who does? Dr. Cynthia Chin and I are excited to announce Materializing Race: An ‘Unconference’ on Objects and Identity in #VastEarlyAmerica! This participant-driven, lightning round-style event will be held in late August via Zoom, with two approximately two-hour afternoon sessions. We welcome interdisciplinary approaches to historical constructions of race and their material legacies in North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean. Presentations will be made in English.

Feel free to be in touch with any questions, submissions can be sent to materializingrace@gmail.com. For more information and submission details, please visit www.cynthiachin.com/materializingrace.

CFP: “Forum: Blind Spots” at Panorama

“Forum: Blind Spots” at Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Inspired by current efforts to reckon with ongoing, systemic racism, we invite proposals for a forum in Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art (Fall 2020) focused on blind spots, especially but not only related to race, that condition and constrain our research and writing. How might unexamined assumptions at the heart of our work in the academy and museum inadvertently perpetuate biases, stereotypes, and generalizations we mean to dismantle in and well beyond art history?

We welcome responses to that question, however uncomfortable, informed by critical race, postcolonial, feminist, queer, and Marxist perspectives, among others, and attentive to the social implications of our practice. To highlight how even revisionist projects can consolidate a monolithic model of subjectivity they aim to deconstruct, we encourage potential contributors to examine blind spots and their consequences in influential art historical projects and/or their own research. We envision a forum that represents a range of viable models for the kind of productive self-criticality for which the moment calls.

Panorama’s forums of this sort comprise “short polemical statements of about 500 to 1,500 words,” often in a personal voice, and related, whole or in part, to visual and material culture of the Americas (see journalpanorama.org). Please send your essay and curriculum vitae as a single pdf document to Anne Monahan and Isabel Taube (blindspot.panorama@gmail.com) by 15 August 2020; we will respond by 1 September 2020.

Questions?
Please contact us at blindspot.panorama@gmail.com.

CFP: Geoffrey Holder Anthology Project

In 1952 Geoffrey Holder took fifteen dancers from his Holder Brothers dance company to the first Caribbean Festival of the Arts in Puerto Rico. It was the first time he was not in an English-speaking Caribbean island and therefore able to see his native Trinidad in relief. There he met and saw artists and dancers perform from other parts of the region such as the great Haitian dancers Celestin and Jean-Léon Destiné. This festival served as Holder’s full artistic awakening as a Caribbean creative. From here on in, he would express an abiding faith in a creative process defined by crossing intellectual, artistic, geographic and conceptual boundaries in ways Caribbean people lived but perhaps took for granted. For Holder, learning to create in the fire of creolizing Vodoun beliefs and practices, Christianity, Buddhist theosophy, fine art histories and practices,, specifically painting, and notions of the folk in service to a sublime aesthetic opened his thinking in transformative ways. He was never the same.

While in Puerto Rico, Holder and his troupe auditioned for the American dancer and choreographer Agnes de Mille and as result of this encounter, they were invited to New York to audition for Sol Hurok. The group arrived in NYC in the spring of 1953. Holder and his brother, the painter Boscoe Holder, who had arrived in NY a few years earlier before leaving for London. The Holder brothers were part of a new wave of Post WWII migrants from the Caribbean that made their way to global cities in the 1950s and 60s for greater opportunities. Taken by the energy of the city, Holder reflected on that time of arrival; “…I knew I could make it here. I just backed myself up against the wall and saw the whole thing and I knew that this was my place. I belonged here.”

Geoffrey Holder does not fit into a single disciplinary home, and as such, presents a problem of methodology. Though he viewed painting as the anchor for everything he accomplished, in the public eye he has historically been treated as a dilettante. This edited publication focuses on the life and work of Holder from his early years in Trinidad to his death in the city to which he belonged some sixty years after he first arrived. It seeks to engage the complexity of this figure and address what we see as an error of interpretation. Our aim is to generate new critical work and new methods to engage the full range of his practice as a painter, dancer, actor, choreographer, director, costume designer, photographer, collector and artist. The print publication and its accompanying digital platform will be focused on cultivating scholarship and a critical archive on the work of an interdisciplinary, African diasporic creative whose multidimensional practice constituted parts of a highly conscious vision.

We invite poets, writers, performers and scholars to engage and rethink the broad expanse of Geoffrey Holder’s life’s work and submit a current CV and chapter abstracts of no more than 500 words that address one of the themes listed below, or a topic of one’s own choosing. Draft chapters are not to exceed 7500 words.

Access to the Holder archives at Emory University, the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture and his estate in New York City will be facilitated for all selected writers during project development.

PROJECT TIMELINE
Deadline for Abstract submission: July 31, 2020
Notification of acceptance: September 18, 2020
First Drafts Due: July 16, 2021

ABSTRACT TOPICS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING • The concept of Caribbean and diasporic aesthetics in Holder’s work • Holder and 1952 Caribana in Puerto Rico • Trinidad arts in the 1930s and 40s – Geoffrey Holder; Beacon Group; Trinidad Arts Society • Artistic and life partnership with Carmen de Lavallade • Holder and de Lavallade’s work with Josephine Baker in the 1960s • Carl Van Vechten’s photographs of Holder and his family at the Beinecke Library at Yale • Various bodies of Holder’s artwork – Portraiture, Trinidad Murals, Paintings of women, Paintings of men – Photography projects Adam (published) and Eve (unpublished) – Collage work from his final years etc. • France as a creative space for Holder and other Black creatives (1950-1970) • Dance and choreography; ie. “Dougla” for the Dance Theatre of Harlem (Footage available) and relationship to Jean-Léon Destiné’s Slave (1949), Alvin Ailey, Katherine Dunham and Caribbean dance from the period • Historicizing Holder’s generation of global Caribbean creatives • Holder as a fashion designer and de Lavallade as muse (All dresses and photographs of Ms. de Lavallade in them are available for close examination) • Black male modelling in 1950s through Holder’s work for Vogue and GQ in the 50s • Work on the Broadway production of The Wiz – Place in the history and politics of black Broadway; Music; Choreography; Costume design; impact of AIDS on the black creative community of the period. • Broadway production of Timbuktu – Music; Dance; Costume; Eartha Kitt • Holder’s deep and abiding interest in Haitian culture. His friendship with Maya Deren • Selling the exotic: – Film work (Live and Let Die, Annie, Boomerang etc.) – Commercial and print ads • Holder as Art Collector: Haitian, African, Modern and Intuitive Art • Differencing the canon – Teaching Holder; Collecting Holder; Curating Holder

Email questions & submissions to ghbp2021@gmail.com with “Geoffrey Holder Project” in the subject line.

 

JOB: Post-doc, Modern & Contemporary at Cleveland Institute of Art

The Liberal Arts Department at the Cleveland Institute of Art seeks qualified applicants to fill a one-year, non-ranked Faculty-in-Residence position teaching art history to begin in the 2020-21 academic year with the possibility for continuation into a full-time ranked faculty position. The committee will consider recent Ph.D graduates, as well as Ph.D (ABD) candidates who have completed their coursework, for this post-doctorate position.

The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) is a nonprofit, private college of art and design that offers BFA degrees in Animation, Ceramics, Drawing, Game Design, Glass, Graphic Design, Industrial Design, Illustration, Interior Architecture, Jewelry + Metals, Life Sciences Illustration/Biomedical Art, Painting, Printmaking, Photography/Video, Sculpture + Expanded Media, Transportation Design as well as “concentration” study through the Liberal Arts Department in Visual Culture and in Creative Writing.

The successful candidate for Academic Year 2020-2021 will teach a full course load. Teaching assignments will include both traditional and theme-based Art History survey courses covering ancient cultures to present day. The faculty-in-residence will also teach elective courses of their design in the history of modern and contemporary art, craft, design and/or media arts. This position offers a $35,000 stipend and a competitive benefits package, as well as an exemption from institutional service.

We seek candidates whose teaching and/or scholarship focuses on modern and contemporary art and includes critical theory and visual culture studies. An ideal candidate will also have familiarity with cross-cultural perspectives and non-western art history.

Preferred secondary areas of expertise include one or more of the following:

  • Moving image and interactive digital media such as video, gaming, or animation
  • Performance art, conceptual art, or socially-engaged practices
  • Contemporary issues relevant to art and design
  • Approaches to pedagogy and instruction that extend beyond Eurocentric models

Preferred Qualifications:

  • D. (in hand or ABD) in Art History
  • A record of publication in the field of expertise
  • Experience teaching Art History at the college level preferred
  • A commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the classroom and with colleagues

Applications received by May 22 will be given full consideration.

To apply for the position please send application materials to Rachael Sauber, Office of Academic Affairs, at rasauber@cia.edu.

Please submit the following materials in PDF format:

  1. A Cover Letter of no more than two double spaced pages detailing qualities the applicant brings to this position and outlining teaching and service, creative/scholarly practices, and other relevant experience
  2. A Curriculum Vitae
  3. A Teaching Statement of no more than two double spaced pages outlining pedagogical methods and with specific attention to the candidate’s commitments to diversity and inclusion in the classroom
  4. Contact information for three (3) references

Semi-finalist candidates will be interviewed via phone or teleconference. Three letters of recommendation will be required for candidates who progress. Finalists will be interviewed via teleconference or, if possible, campus visits in June, 2020. Finalists must be eligible to work in the United States on or before July 1, 2020.

The Cleveland Institute of Art is one of the nation’s leading independent colleges of art and design, is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and National Association of Colleges of Art and Design (NASAD), and a proud member of Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD). Since 1882, the college has been an educational cornerstone in Cleveland, Ohio, and produces graduates competitive as studio artists, designers, contemporary craftspeople, and educators. Instructors across the college embrace both theory and practice and engage with emerging technologies in cutting-edge facilities. CIA is also home to the Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque offering classic, foreign, and independent films 50 weekends of the year in the Peter B. Lewis Theatre, as well as the Reinberger Gallery, which presents exhibitions of internationally recognized artwork and educational opportunities along with literary readings and speaker events. It is centrally located in the heart of University Circle, a growing, vibrant and diverse center for education and the arts that is home to Museum of Contemporary Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Cleveland Institute of Music, and Case Western Reserve University.

The Cleveland Institute of Art is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, committed to building and sustaining a culturally and ethnically diverse campus environment, and to the principles that promote inclusion.

CIA is dedicated to excellence through diversity and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, sex, disability, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, marital status, gender identity, veteran status or any other non-job related criteria. CIA recognizes the importance of a multicultural community of students, faculty, and staff who seek to advance our commitment to diversity. We invite applications from individuals with diverse backgrounds and from those who have academic experiences with diverse populations. An offer of employment will be conditional upon background verification.

Mission: To cultivate creative leaders who inspire people, strengthen communities, and contribute to a thriving and sustainable economy through an innovative education in art and design.

 

JOB: Chief Curator at International African American Museum, Charleston

WE ARE RECRUITING A CHIEF CURATOR
The International African American Museum in Charleston, South Carolina seeks a dynamic and effective museum professional to serve as Chief Curator. Located on Gadsden’s Wharf, the museum is scheduled to open in early 2022.

The ideal candidate for this position is a collaborative and forward-thinking, senior-leader with at least seven to ten years of progressive experience in a museum curatorial department; broad experience as an administrator and
manager; and experience with strategic planning and team building.
This is a full-time, permanent position.

All inquiries, nominations and applications may be directed to resumes@iaamuseum.org. Applications will not be accepted unless submitted in compliance with the guidelines in this position description. For more information about the International African American Museum, please visit http://www.iaamuseum.org.

THE POSITION
The Chief Curator will provide leadership Exhibitions
and strategic direction for the intellectual and interpretive strategies of the museum’s curatorial program including the research, design, and implementation of innovative exhibition strategies; care, management, and development of artifact, archival, and digital collections; development and production of dynamic educational and public programs, and facilitating access to genealogical resources; and oversight and guidance for the Center for Family History, the museum’s genealogy center.

The successful candidate is a gifted leader, compelling communicator—both in writing and spoken word—an outstanding researcher, and able administrator, and a strong advocate for the museum. She or he will infuse energy into innovative and creative initiatives, and leverage collections, resources, and partnerships. It is essential that they be equally comfortable organizing major exhibitions, and/or using the platform to address timely and provocative topics such as racial identity or issues of social justice.

A member of the Museum’s senior leadership team, the Chief Curator reports directly to the Chief Executive Officer. The Chief Curator will oversee these critical aspects of Museum operations:
• In partnership with the Museum’s CEO and senior leadership team, the Chief Curator guides and will manage the installation of the Museum’s opening exhibitions. This will include shaping messaging, implementing final object and graphic selection, media and film development, script writing/editing, and scholarly reviews.
• A major part of this role includes collaborating with and managing all exhibition consultants.
• The Chief Curator will develop and implement a long-term vision for the Museum’s exhibition program that utilizes a collaborative and integrated approach that significantly enhances the quality of the visitor experience, attracts positive press, and earns respect from the general public and community of historians.
• The Chief Curator will also conduct and/ or supervise the development of in-house produced exhibitions including research, artifact and image selection, digital/media production, and script writing.
• The Chief Curator will work in collaboration with the Education and Engagement department to support audience assessment, community engagement, and curricula development.

Collections Management
• The Chief Curator will develop a multidisciplinary, long-term collections strategy providing stewardship and accountability for the museum’s future collections including artifacts, works of art, archival and digital resources.
• The Chief Curator oversees and coordinates all aspects of collections management activities including acquisitions, loans, storage, security, documentation, conservation, inventory, installation/deinstallation, and digitization.
• The Chief Curator will also develop, implement, and maintain collections management systems and databases including applicable training, policy, protocols, and procedures.
Research
• The Chief Curator conducts, directs, and encourages original, independent scholarly research on African American history and culture. The curator defines topics of genuine significance and ensure alignment with the museum’s strategic goals and priorities.
The Chief Curator determines the feasibility of the topic for exhibition, publication, and/ or public programming for both general and specialized audiences.
• The Chief Curator initiates, reviews, and/
or evaluates proposals for new research projects or major shifts in existing research or curatorial initiatives. The curator will also render decisions on proposals and provide leadership and guidance on their improvement and/or implementation.
Management
• The Chief Curator recruits, trains, and supervises the museum’s curatorial department staff and consultants.
• The Chief Curator has oversight of the Center for Family History.

Qualifications
• At minimum, a Master’s degree in African American history or related field; knowledge of South Carolina history and a working understanding of African American genealogy is preferred but not required.
• A recognized expert in the field with at least three years senior management experience; minimum seven years applied and progressive museum curatorial experience.
• Evidence of and commitment to original scholarship with a proven record of initiating, curating, and delivering well received exhibitions, publications, and, to a lesser degree, public programs.
• An understanding of visitor-centered approaches to content development.
• Senior-level management and leadership experience with a track record of success in managing people, operations, policies, and budgets.
• Highly developed research, writing, and oral communication skills; the presence
and credibility to serve as an effective museum spokesperson with visitors, outside communities, supporters and donors, the public, and the media.
• A positive, proactive, and collegial work ethic.

Application Requirements
Applications should be submitted to resumes@iaamuseum.org. Applications
will only be accepted electronically.
A complete application will include a resume detailing relevant educational and work experience, and a cover letter describing the applicant’s interest in the position and three professional references. The position will remain open until filled.

 

Edmonia Lewis on The View — VARIETY . SPICE . LIFE

For Valentine’s Day, EL is part of the conversation on The View Here’s her Cupid Caught In A Trap (1872-76) SAAM

via Edmonia Lewis on The View — VARIETY . SPICE . LIFE

JOB: Asst Prof, Early Modern @ Kenyon College

The Department of Art History at Kenyon College is accepting applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Early Modern Art History. The appointment will begin in August 2020. Candidates should have expertise in the material culture of Early Modern Europe from the Baroque to the early Industrial Age. We seek a creative colleague who can immediately contribute to re-shaping the curriculum. Applicants must be interested in offering a fresh, global perspective on permanent courses, including the Survey of Art, and developing new courses at the introductory, intermediate, and advanced levels. We are interested in teacher-scholars who can offer creative ways to engage with the Department’s Visual Resources Center, our Study Collection, and regional art museums located in Columbus and Cleveland. Candidates’ teaching and research should emphasize an interdisciplinary perspective that demonstrates interest in connections between Europe, the Americas, Africa, and/or Asia. We particularly welcome candidates with expertise in one or more of the following areas: architecture, museums, and pre–1900 print culture, including photography, prints, and manuscripts. Applicants should complement, not duplicate, current expertise of the department. Applicants must be able to demonstrate excellence in teaching, with evidence of support for Kenyon’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. The candidate will have the opportunity to play a leadership role in the College’s study abroad program in Rome, Italy.

Qualifications: A completed Ph.D. in Art History is required. Experience teaching beyond graduate assistantships is strongly desired at the time of hire. The successful candidate will also demonstrate potential for active scholarly engagement within their field of expertise, and to perform service to the College and the profession. The selected candidate will be expected to contribute to one of the interdisciplinary concentrations at the College, such as African Diaspora Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and Women and Gender Studies, depending on their particular expertise and interest.

Duties: Teach 3/2 load undergraduate courses, including second half of the Survey of Art and intermediate and upper-level seminars on topics from the Baroque to the early Industrial Age. The selected candidate will also serve as an advisor and mentor to students, including potential independent study and honor’s theses across the college; maintain an active program of research/scholarship leading to peer-reviewed publication; and perform service to the department and college.

How to Apply: Applicants must submit a CV, cover letter, teaching philosophy, contact information for three references, and unofficial transcripts. For more information and to apply, visit www.kenyon.edu/directories/offices-services/human-resources/employment-opportunities/

Review of applicants begins January 15, 2020

Questions: Please direct questions to the search chair, Austin Porter, Assistant Professor of Art History and American Studies, at portera[at]kenyon.edu

Symposium @ Lunder Institute, Colby College

SAVE THE DATE: March 12-13, 2020
Lunder Institute Research Symposium: Art by African Americans
Lunder Institute for American Art, Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, Maine

The Lunder Institute is organizing a research symposium in conjunction with its inaugural Research Fellows Program focused on art by African Americans. To kick off this free public event, on the evening of Thursday, March 12, the Lunder Institute and the Colby Museum will host a conversation between renowned artist David C. Driskell and Curlee R. Holton of the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park. Presentations by the Lunder Institute Research Fellows, invited speakers, and members of the Colby community will take place throughout the day on Friday, March 13. Fellows will share their research on selected artworks at the Colby Museum, connecting it to important questions in the field regarding African American artists. A roundtable featuring leading academics and curators will comment on the current state and parameters of African American art history and reflect on how and why art by African Americans has been distinguished from the broader field of American art.

Confirmed speakers include: Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Princeton University; Adrienne L. Childs, Harvard University; Tuliza Fleming, National Museum of African American History and Culture; Melanee Harvey, Howard University; Key Jo Lee, Cleveland Museum of Art; Tess Korobkin, University of Maryland, College Park; John Ott, James Madison University; James Smalls, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Diana Tuite, Colby College Museum of Art; Rebecca VanDiver, Vanderbilt University.

For more information on the 2019-2020 Lunder Institute Research Fellows Program, go to www.colby.edu/lunderinstitute/2019/09/11/inaugural-research-fellows-for-2019-2020/. Questions about the symposium should be directed to Tanya Sheehan, Distinguished Scholar and Director of Research, tsheehan@colby.edu.

ACRAH @ CAA2020

Check out the description of our CAA2020 ACRAH Session “Unlearning Art History: Anti-Racist Work in PreModern Fields”: https://acrah.org/caa/caa2020/

We will also hold a Business Meeting on February 14th at 12:30pm at the Hilton Chicago, Room 4M. Join us!

 

JOB: Africa/African Diaspora @ Courtauld

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in the arts of Africa and/or the African diaspora, within the broad period from c. 1800 to the present. This appointment offers an exciting opportunity to transform The Courtauld’s teaching and research, and to provide academic leadership in fields of critical importance to the discipline, within and beyond the institute. It is one of two new posts in this broad field, the other being a Professorship.

We invite applications from early and mid-career scholars with a profile in research and teaching commensurate with their career stage.

These posts are part of The Courtauld’s commitment to a more inclusive and diverse curriculum. They are generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Application is online. You will also need to include a CV and a supporting statement of no more than 1500 words. You should also give the names of 3 referees.

The supporting statement should set out how you meet the criteria of this position, and include a brief statement about your research profile. This should include your current and future research plans, your teaching plans and experience, your administrative experience, and potential to contribute to the research profile and impact of The Courtauld. Please address the criteria set out in the Person Specification when preparing your statement.

Interviews for the position will take place on Thursday 5th and Friday 6th December 2019.

If you would like an informal conversation about the roles please contact Dr Jo Applin, Head of Art History. jo.applin@courtauld.ac.uk

https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=323