Curatorial Assistant, Contemporary Art @ Whitney Museum of American Art

A full-time Curatorial Assistant position, reporting to the Nancy and Fred Poses Associate Curator, is available. The incumbent will work on some of the Whitney’s most exciting and challenging contemporary projects, including exhibitions, acquisitions, and publications. A strong interest in contemporary art is essential, and production-oriented experience a plus.

Responsibilities include: assistance in the planning and installation of exhibitions and projects, including management of checklists, schedules, and databases; daily administrative support (telephone, management of the Curator’s calendar; maintenance of records, drafting correspondence, preparation of presentations, travel arrangements, processing invoices, and other general office and clerical duties); scholarly research on artists and acquisitions; preparation and writing of didactic texts; serving as liaison with the Curator’s internal and external contacts, including artists, trustees, donors, scholars, and museum departments such as Conservation, Exhibitions and Collections Management, Publications, and Research Resources.

Job requirements: B.A. in art history (M.A. a plus) and 2 years institutional work history, or equivalent experience; skills related to TMS, Raiser’s Edge, Microsoft Office, Excel, and PowerPoint; outstanding organizational, writing, research, and communication skills, with attention to detail; facility in representing the Whitney at events at the Museum and beyond; ability to handle several projects simultaneously, work well as a member of a team, and meet deadlines.

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to: hr@whitney.org and state “Curatorial Assistant Contemporary” in the subject line.

For more information see http://whitney.org/About/JobPostings

JOB: Curatorial Assistant Position, American Art @ Whitney Museum of Art

A full-time Curatorial Assistant position, reporting to the DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, is available. The incumbent will work with the Director and his team on all matters related to the development and display of the Museum’s esteemed collection of modern and contemporary American art, assisting with scholarly projects as well as a variety of administrative tasks. Excellent research and writing skills a must, and a focus in American art before 1945 strongly preferred.

Responsibilities include: scholarly research on artists and acquisitions; preparation and writing of didactic texts; assistance in the planning and installation of collection displays, including management of checklists, schedules, and databases; coordination of gifts and support of Museum committees dedicated to acquisitions and loans; maintenance of object files; serving as liaison with the Director of the Collection’s internal and external contacts, including artists, trustees, donors, scholars, and museum departments such as Conservation, Exhibitions and Collections Management, Publications, and Research Resources ; daily administrative support (telephone, management of the Director of the Collection’s calendar; maintenance of records, drafting correspondence, preparation of presentations, travel arrangements, processing invoices, and other general office and clerical duties).

Job requirements:   B.A. in art history (M.A. a plus); 3 years museum/gallery experience; working knowledge of 20th- and 21st-century art history with a focus in American art before 1945; clerical and organizational skills, including experience with TMS, Microsoft Office, Excel, and PowerPoint; excellent writing, research, and communication skills, with attention to detail; ability to handle several projects simultaneously and meet deadlines.

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:  hr@whitney.org and state “Curatorial Assistant” in the subject line.

See http://whitney.org/About/JobPostings

About the Whitney

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for 86 years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.

JOB: Curator-in-Residence @ The Driskell Center/UMD Art Gallery

The University of Maryland Art Gallery at College Park is now accepting applications for its first Curator-in-Residence program: http://www.driskellcenter.umd.edu/about/employment_opp.php

Starting in July 2017, the successful candidate will participate in a one-year residency in which they will originate and present two exhibitions and related public programs. The Curator-in-Residence will work closely with the Executive Director of the David C. Driskell Center at the University of Maryland as well as the Assistant Director of The University of Maryland Art Gallery.

The University of Maryland Art Gallery is pleased to launch its first Curator-in-Residence program with the main objective of engaging an experienced curator with The University of Maryland Art Gallery and the community it serves. The successful candidate will curate innovative exhibitions and assist The University of Maryland Art Gallery with developing programs that promote greater accessibility to both the university community and the general public. The Curator-in-Residence will serve as a professional resource for students, local artists, and arts professionals, both at the University of Maryland and in the local communities of Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia, and must have a keen interest in understanding and working with university students and artists.

The Curator-in-Residence’s responsibilities include, but are not limited to:
• Curate two exhibitions of diverse mediums of professionally highprofile contemporary artists
• Provide content (e.g. checklist, introduction) for catalogues, brochures, press releases, and all related publicity material, etc., as well as prepare didactic text for exhibitions
• Write essays when required for individual exhibition publications
• Suggest and assist with selecting speakers for guest lectures, gallery tours, artist residencies, etc.
• Present a curator talk, at least one per exhibition
• Organize a two-hour seminar in curatorial practices and studies for undergraduate and graduate students, one per semester
• Write one or two critiques and reviews about a local art exhibition for publication in local, regional, and/or national platform
• Make recommendations for future gallery programming and assist with identifying a potential Curator-in-Residence for the following year
Minimum required qualifications:
• An MFA or MA in Art History, Museum Studies, or another relevant related field
• Demonstrated knowledge of a particular historical period, preferably modern and contemporary art
• Excellent verbal and written communications skills are essential
• Creative individual with the capacity to take initiative, work well independently as well as with a team, and adjust easily to an ever-changing, demanding, arts organization
• Minimum of five years’ experience as curator in an academic museum, non-profit or similar setting
• Proven records of publications
• Teaching experience is preferred

The Curator-in-Residence is a part-time, outside consultant position; his/her presence at the University is required for nine visits, four days each, over the one-year period. Payment as an outside consultant will be provide monthly, at $2,200 each month (total $26,400 for twelve months), based on completion of the tasks required. The Curator-in-Residence will be involved in all curatorial aspects during the residency and will have full administrative support from the The University of Maryland Art Gallery, the David C. Driskell Center, and the University of Maryland.

To apply:
Please send the following documents to:
driskellcenter@umd.edu with subject: Curator-in-Residence_LASTNAME

• A one-page cover letter outlining curatorial interests, professional experience, and what you hope to accomplish in a twelve-month residency at The University of Maryland Art Gallery

• A résumé

• Five JPEGS of previous exhibitions and public events organized by the applicant

• One academic or critical writing sample

• One didactic writing sample for “general” audience

• Contact information for three professional references.

EXH: Black Fashion Designers @ FIT until May 16, 2017

On view: December 6, 2016 through May 16, 2017 This sweeping exhibition showcases works of fashion designers of African descent created from the 1950s through now. Organized into themes including “Breaking into the Industry,” “Rise of the Black Designer,” “Eveningwear,” “African Influences,” “Street Influences,” “Activism,” “Menswear,” “Black Models” and “Experimentation,” the fashions are as varied as the designers […]

via Black Fashion Designers at FIT Museum — Fashion, Textile & Costume Librarians

REF: Race and Norman Rockwell

On the 6th of March 1943, iconic painter and illustrator of American culture Norman Rockwell, published Freedom from Want or The Thanksgiving Picture in The Saturday Evening Post, one of over 300 covers he produced for the Indianapolis publication during his lifetime. It was the third of four oil paintings known as the Four Freedoms inspired by […]

via White on White: Hidden Race in Rockwell’s ‘Freedom from Want’ — A R T L▼R K

Race and American Visual Culture seminar @ American Antiquarian Society

2017 Center for Historic American Visual Culture (CHAViC) Summer Seminar

In Black and White: Race and American Visual Culture

American Antiquarian Society

Dates of Seminar: June 9-13, 2017

Applications Due: March 15, 2017

The 2017 CHAViC Summer Seminar at the American Antiquarian Society will explore how American visual culture expressed ideas about race, specifically blackness and whiteness, across the long nineteenth century. Through lectures, readings, hands-on workshops, and group research, participants will learn how popular forms of visual culture have constructed racial identities in the United States and how looking can function as a racialized practice. The seminar leader will be Tanya Sheehan, associate professor and chair of the Art Department at Colby College and editor of the Archives of American Art Journal at the Smithsonian Institution. Guest faculty will include Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor, assistant professor in the History Department at Smith College and Jasmine Nichole Cobb, assistant professor in the Department of African & American Studies at Duke University.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn from the extraordinary collections at AAS, including popular prints, political cartoons, photographs, illustrated books and periodicals, sheet music, and ephemera such as trade cards. Case studies may include: caricatures of African Americans in Edward Clay’s lithographic series Life in Philadelphia (1828-1830), the visual culture of blackface minstrelsy and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), graphics from popular periodicals like Harper’s Weekly that picture racial politics at key moments in U.S. history, efforts to recreate the “image of the black” by African American writer Phillis Wheatley and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, fantasies of racial difference in illustrated children’s books and commercial trade cards, and efforts to visualize raced bodies in early photographic portraiture. There will be a field trip to the Museum of African American History in Boston to view the exhibition Picturing Frederick Douglass.

The seminar will be held from Friday, June 9, through Tuesday, June 13, 2017, at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. Participation is intended for college and university faculty as well as graduate students and museum professionals.

For further information, syllabus, and application materials, please consult the AAS website at www.americanantiquarian.org/2017-chavic-summer-seminar

 

Teaching Tool: Exploration of Appalachian Identity through Photography

I teach art history and art appreciation in the Department of Art and Design at Morehead State University in eastern Kentucky. Most of my students are first-generation college students, and many of them come from the economically-depressed counties within a short driving distance of my institution. Through in-class discussion and office hour chats, I have […]

via Appalachian Identities and Photography as Social Commentary — Art History Teaching Resources

EXH: Muslims in New York @ Museum of the City of New York

Muslims have been woven into the fabric of New York since the city’s origins as New Amsterdam, and the Museum is happy to share highlights from our collection which shed light on this deep history in our current exhibition, Muslim in New York. The size and diversity of New York’s Muslim community has continued to […]

via Muslim in New York: Highlights from the Photography Collection — MCNY Blog: New York Stories

CFP: Special Latino Art issue of the Archives of American Art Journal

Call for essay proposals closes March 1

The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art is planning an issue of the Archives of American Art Journal devoted to Latino art. This special issue will offer a valuable opportunity for scholars and artists to increase the visibility of Latino studies in the field of American art history as well as enrich the study of Latino art with primary sources at the Archives of American Art. While the Archives has been collecting the papers of Latino artists for decades, the focused collecting initiative that it launched in 2015 has resulted in the acquisition of many important new collections, which include the personal papers of artists, gallery and organization records, and oral history interviews. You can explore the Archives’ Latino art research collections online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

Essays selected for publication in the journal will offer new approaches to Latino art and artists by thinking in innovative ways about primary sources in the Archives of American Art. Authors must identify the specific collections that will inform their research. Please include the following in a single MS Word document and email it to Tanya Sheehan, editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, SheehanT@si.edu, by March 1, 2017:

* Author name and contact information

* Proposed manuscript title and abstract of no more than 250 words

The journal’s editorial team will review the proposals and then invite select authors to prepare a manuscript of 5,000-7,000 words (including endnotes) for double-blind peer review. Complete manuscripts for review will be due by July 1, 2017. Essays must be previously unpublished and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Archives of American Art Journal is the longest-running scholarly journal devoted to the history of American art. It aims to showcase new approaches to and out-of-the-box thinking about primary sources. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press, the journal contains both peer-reviewed research and commissioned articles based in part on the vast holdings of the Archives.

Information on manuscript submissions and review criteria is available on the journal’s webpage, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/aaa.

EXH: “Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze” @ David Driskell Center, opens March 2nd

The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park is proud to announce its spring exhibition, Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze. The exhibition, organized by the Driskell Center, is curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton, assisted by Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron. The exhibition will be on display at the Driskell Center from Thursday, March 2, 2017 through Friday, May 26, 2017, with an opening reception on Thursday, March 2nd, from 5-7PM.