FEL: The Metropolitan Museum of Art annual fellowship competition is open

The Metropolitan Museum of Art welcomes applications from scholars of art history, archaeology, conservation and related sciences, as well as from scholars in other disciplines whose projects are interdisciplinary in nature and relate to objects in The Met’s collection. The tremendous diversity of fellows’ projects reflects the historic and geographic diversity of the Museum’s collection. The community of fellows becomes immersed in the intellectual life of the Museum and takes part in a robust program of colloquia, roundtable seminars, research-sharing workshops, behind-the-scenes tours of exhibitions, conversations with Museum staff, and visits to the curatorial and conservation departments. Fellows form long-lasting professional relationships as they discuss research questions, look closely at objects, and share the experience of living in New York City.

Applications are open now for 2018–2019 Fellowships. Please visit http://www.metmuseum.org/about-the-met/fellowships for more information

Deadlines for all application materials (including letters of recommendation):

  • Art History Fellowships – November 3, 2017
  • Museum Education and Public Practice Fellowship – November 3, 2017
  • Curatorial Research Fellowships – November 3, 2017
  • Mellon Post-Doctoral Curatorial Fellowships – November 3, 2017
  • Leonard A. Lauder Fellowships in Modern Art – November 3, 2017
  • Conservation and Scientific Research Fellowships – December 1, 2017
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CFP: Black Portraitures IV; DEADLINE EXTENDED: 10/1

Event Timing: March 15-17, 2018.
Event Address: Havana, Cuba

BLACK PORTRAITURE[S] IV: The Color of Silence is the eighth conference in a series of international conversations to assess and break new ground in the fields of African, African American and African diasporic art and art history. This forum also provides various approaches to interpreting the representations, ambiguous meanings, and erasures of the black body in visual, social, material and expressive cultures. Over a span of fifteen years, artists, activists, patrons, musicians, writers, collectives, journalists, educators and scholars have come from across the globe to reflect on why and how conceptions of “blackness” shape historical imaginaries and subvert political ideologies. This is an opportunity to situate not only various macro-histories but also the micro-histories that inform a genealogy of innovative interrogations into the social structures that articulate—or silence—black subjectivity.

The conference aims to explore the aesthetic representation of the frameworks and social relations in which black bodies are seen and unseen, in which black lives are lived freely and under constraint, and most crucially, the representation of black subjects themselves. Examples abound throughout the African diaspora of how the humanity of black subjects is rendered invisible or hyper-visible—or both simultaneously (Cuba’s “antiracism,” Brazil’s “racial democracy,” South Africa’s “rainbow nation,” Jamaica’s “out of many, one people” motto, and the “postracial” U.S. are just a few examples). We invite papers that interrogate the complex intersections of race, history, culture and art.

In past conferences, participants have offered generative exchanges on everything from tourism and pop culture (art, fashion, music, dance, film), to revolutionary movements, pedagogy, the history of colonization and its impact on cultural expression, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the contemporary entanglements of the global marketplace. With this latest iteration of Black Portraitures, we seek papers and panel proposals that probe and build off of these themes and provide new methodologies, and even new questions, for the 21st century.

Deadline for submissions: October 1, 2017
Notice of acceptance: October 27, 2017

All proposals must be submitted through completion of the online form. Follow the link at http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/black-portraitures-iv

The conference will be held on Thursday through Saturday, March 15-17, 2018, in Havana, Cuba.  As the status of the US/Cuba relations are in flux, more information about travel will be available when the new Administration’s policies are enacted.  We will keep you posted.

Please note that as with most academic conferences, we are unable to provide institutional funding for travel to Black Portraitures.

Black Portraiture[s] IV is a collaboration with the U.S. Ambassador to Cuba, Jeffrey DeLaurentis; Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University; New York University’s LaPietra Dialogues, Tisch School of the Arts, and the Institute for African American Affairs.

Please contact blackportraitures@gmail.com with questions.

CFP: Beyond Boundaries: Artistic inquiries into borders and their meaning(s) @ Association for Art History 2018

Association for Art History Annual Conference 2018

5-7 April 2018

Courtauld Institute of Art and King’s College London

Deadline for submissions: 6 November 2017

Beyond Boundaries: Artistic inquiries into borders and their meaning(s)

Borders have played a critical role in the development and distribution of culture, often acting as frameworks that help or hinder our ability to ‘look outwards’. In The Location of Culture, Homi Bhabha calls attention to the value of interstitial spaces, where borders, frames, and other locations ‘in- between’ become ‘innovative sites of collaboration and contestation in the act of defining the idea of society itself.’ Other philosophical considerations of borders, such as Martin Heidegger’s concept of gestell, or enframing, Jacques Derrida’s deconstruction of Enlightenment aesthetics vis-à-vis the parergon, and Victor Stoichita’s analysis of framing devices in early modern ‘meta-painting’, have demonstrated the transformative power of edges, frames, borders, and boundaries in art.

This session will focus on works of art, artistic practices, and art historical perspectives that think critically and creatively about borders and their meaning(s). The goal is to expand our understanding of borders, whether physical or conceptual, historical or theoretical. In the spirit of pushing beyond boundaries of convention and ‘looking outwards’, we welcome papers that focus on any medium, art historical period, or curatorial practice. Papers may address, though are not limited to: art that explores the significance of borders to migrants, immigrants, diasporic communities or other groups residing (both literally and figuratively) ‘in-between’; activist art that interrogates borders and their meaning(s); the role of public art, public space, and social media in thinking beyond boundaries; the metaphorical and/or literal framing of a work of art and its effects; the symbolic purpose or meaning of frames in various cultural contexts (for instance, the role of framing in religious spaces or objects, such as tabernacles, wall niches, icon paintings, and marginalia).

Please email your paper proposals directly to the session chairs:

Mey-Yen Moriuchi, La Salle University, moriuchi@lasalle. edu

Lesley Shipley, Randolph College, lshipley@randolphcollege.edu

Proposals should include an abstract (250 words maximum) and CV.

Click here for the full call for AAH submissions.

Papers topics addressing critical race art history, theory, and curatorial practices welcome.

REV: The changing focus of black artists

Tonya Nelson examines the changing responses of black artists to racism since the Civil Rights Era

via From denouncing racism to destabilising systems: the changing focus of black artists — Media Diversified

JOB: Assistant Professor/Provost Fellow- Black Atlantic Art and Architecture @ UChicago

The Department of Art History at the University of Chicago seeks (an) art or architectural historian(s) of the Black Atlantic, specializing in any pertinent historical period and in any territory of Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, North America, Iberia, and/or the more ramified Atlantic world. We are also interested in art or architectural historians working more broadly on race, (post)colonialism, and visual culture in the Atlantic world. The ability to work across fields and subfields is highly desirable, as we expect the successful candidate to collaborate with faculty within and beyond our department.

The Department of Art History values diversity. A goal of the search is to increase the diversity of the faculty in the Department of Art History and across the Humanities Division, and we therefore welcome applicants from groups historically underrepresented in academia, such as black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaskan Native.

Successful candidates will be appointed either as a tenure-track Assistant Professor, or as a Provost Fellow at the rank of Instructor with an initial two-year faculty appointment. This initial period is intended to serve in lieu of a postdoctoral appointment. Provost Fellows will teach one class/year, receive research support, and participate in programming designed to help support them in their transition to Assistant Professor. Provost Fellows will ordinarily be promoted to Assistant Professor at the end of their 2-year term. Candidates for Provost Fellow appointment must have no more than two years of postdoctoral experience. All candidates must have the Ph.D. in hand by the start of the appointment, 1 July 2018.

Complete application materials include cover letter (including discussion of research and teaching interests), CV, two scholarly writing samples, names and contact information for three professional references, and a statement describing the applicant’s prior and potential contributions to diversity in the context of academic research, teaching, and service. Applicants should send all materials in electronic format (MS Word or PDF) to Caroline Altekruse at caltekruse@uchicago.edu with subject heading “Black Atlantic Art and Architecture Search.” In addition, applicants must upload the CV and cover letter to the Academic Career Opportunities website at http://tinyurl.com/ya6e3sek. No applications received after 20 September 2017 will be accepted. University positions are contingent upon budgetary approval.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Disabled/Veterans Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law. For additional information please see the University’s Notice of Nondiscrimination at http://www.uchicago.edu/about/non_discrimination_statement/. Job seekers in need of a reasonable accommodation to complete the application process should call 773-702-0287 or email ACOppAdministrator@uchicago.edu with their request.

CFP: “A Way/s From Home: Blackness Across Nations” @ CAA2018

The following session is for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February, 21 – 24, 2018. Proposals from ACRAH members most welcome.

A Way/s from Home: Blackness across Nations
Chair(s): Julie L. McGee, University of Delaware, mcgee@udel.edu

In 1964, African American writer and artist Allen Polite, living then in Stockholm, organized “10 American Negro Artist[s] Living and Working in Europe” for Copenhagen’s Den Frie, one of the oldest venues for contemporary art in Denmark. Polite included work by Harvey Cropper, Beauford Delaney, Herbert Gentry, Arthur Hardie, Clifford Jackson, Sam Middleton, Earl Miller, Norma Morgan, Larry Potter, and Walter Williams. Polite’s justification for the grouping was poetic if not opaque: “In short, apart from their distinguishing racial features these exhibitors have only this in common: they are all living in Europe at present. And that is natural enough when one considers the unwritten tradition in art history that makes the artist a wanderer, an observer and digestor [sic] of cultures; a restless soul in search of the images and symbols.” Many black artists took up residence in Europe after WWII to study or to live on a semi-permanent basis. Many found both camaraderie and exhibition opportunities with other African American artists living abroad. To what extent they escaped racial discrimination or exchanged one kind for another is debatable: personal, conceptual, and artistic freedoms and external perceptions of blackness are codependent. Disputes over artistic freedom and both real and hypothetical homefront responsibilities haunt this history and artistic practice. Europe’s inconsistent place within a “freedom narrative” illuminates the complexity of blackness and artistic agency on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. This session encourages presentations that revisit, revise, or otherwise creatively engage the problematic of the “expat.”

Please send 250-word proposals, a completed session participation proposal form, and a short academic CV to Julie McGee mcgee@udel.edu by 14 August 2017.

Please consult the guidelines at the end of the CAA Call for Participation (http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf) for further details.

CFP: “Critical Race Art Histories in Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe” @ CAA2018

The following session for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February, 21 – 24, 2018 is sponsored by the Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art (HGSCEA). They especially welcome submissions from ACRAH members.

Critical Race Art Histories in Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe

Chair: Allison Morehead, Queen’s University

Critical race theory, which entered art history through postcolonial analyses of representations of black bodies, has remained relatively peripheral to art historical studies of Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe, whose colonial histories differ from those of countries such as Britain, France, and the United States. At the same time, art historical examinations of white supremacy in the Nazi period are frequently sectioned off from larger histories of claims to white superiority and privilege. Centering critical race theory in the art histories of Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe, this panel will consider representations of race in the broadest of terms — including “white makings of whiteness,” in the words of Richard Dyer. We invite papers that together will explore the imagination and construction of a spectrum of racial and ethnic identities, as well as marginalization and privilege, in and through German, Scandinavian, and Central European art, architecture, and visual culture in any period. How have bodies been racialized through representation, and how might representations of spaces, places, and land — the rural or wilderness vs. the urban, for instance — also be critically analyzed in terms of race? Priority will be given to papers that consider the intersections of race with other forms of subjectivity and identity.

Please send 250-word proposals, a completed session participation proposal form, and a short academic CV to Allison Morehead at morehead@queensu.ca by 14 August 2017.

Please consult the guidelines at the end of the CAA Call for Participation (http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf) for further details.

CFP: ‘Curating Difference: Race and Ethnicity in the US Museum” ACRAH @ CAA2018

The CFP for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference has been posted online.

CAA2018 will be held in Los Angeles, California running from Wednesday, February 21st through Saturday, February 24th, 2018.

ACRAH will be holding the following session at the conference and invite submissions to participate on the panel:

Curating Difference: Race and Ethnicity in the US Museum

Chairs: Bridget Cooks, University of California, Irvine & Camara Holloway, ACRAH

This session is intended as a conversation addressing how to implement a critical race visual studies-informed practice in a museum setting. Topics for consideration include: how mainstream and/or culturally-specific institutions in the US have embraced such an approach; case-studies about exhibitions devoted to art made by US-based artists of color and/or art made about American communities of color; and strategies promoting greater racial and ethnic sensitivity amongst extant museum professionals as well as diversifying their ranks in terms of the ethno-racial backgrounds and/or awareness of future hires. Submissions from Los Angeles-area and West Coast-based curators and museum professionals are especially encouraged, as are topics focused on this region.

Deadline: August 14, 2017

A 250-word presentation abstract, a short CV, a statement of interest, and completed Session Participation Proposal Submission Form should be sent to both Camara Holloway at camara.holloway@icloud.com and Bridget Cooks at b.cooks@uci.edu

Please note that CAA now requires that all session participants be an active individual CAA member through February 24, 2018, and must register for at least the session in which you participate. Early conference registration at the discount rate opens in early October. Please refer to the CFP for additional details and instructions.

FEL: Modeling Interdisciplinary Inquiry @ Washington University, St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis announces the eighteenth year of Modeling Interdisciplinary Inquiry, a postdoctoral fellowship program endowed by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, designed to encourage interdisciplinary scholarship and teaching across the humanities and social sciences. We invite applications from recent PhDs, DPhils, or D.F.A.s (in hand by June 30, 2018, and, no earlier than June 30, 2013) for a position as Fellow. In September 2018, the newly selected Fellows will join the University’s ongoing interdisciplinary programs and seminars. The Fellows will receive a two-year appointment with a nine-month academic year salary beginning at $54,150 per year. Postdoctoral Fellows pursue their own continuing research in association with a senior faculty mentor at WU. During the two years of their tenure, they will teach three undergraduate courses and collaborate in leading an interdisciplinary seminar on theory and methods for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the humanities and interpretive social sciences.

Applicants should submit, through Interfolio, a cover letter, a description of their research program (no more than 1800 words and accessible to reviewers in other fields), a brief proposal for an interdisciplinary seminar in theory and methods, and a curriculum vitae. Applicants who have not completed their doctoral work should indicate, in their cover letter, how many chapters of their dissertation are complete and how complete the remaining chapters are. Applicants should arrange for the submission of three confidential letters of recommendation, also via Interfolio. Further information on Modeling Interdisciplinary Inquiry is available on the web at http://mii.wustl.edu/. Please email us at mii@wustl.edu with additional questions.

Submit materials to Interfolio at the following link by December 4, 2017: apply.interfolio.com/42295 (Portal opens September 1, 2017.)

Washington University in St. Louis is committed to the principles and practices of equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. It is the University’s policy to recruit, hire, train, and promote persons in all job titles without regard to race, color, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, veteran status, disability, or genetic information.

Curatorial Assistant, Contemporary Art @ Whitney Museum of American Art

A full-time Curatorial Assistant position, reporting to the Nancy and Fred Poses Associate Curator, is available. The incumbent will work on some of the Whitney’s most exciting and challenging contemporary projects, including exhibitions, acquisitions, and publications. A strong interest in contemporary art is essential, and production-oriented experience a plus.

Responsibilities include: assistance in the planning and installation of exhibitions and projects, including management of checklists, schedules, and databases; daily administrative support (telephone, management of the Curator’s calendar; maintenance of records, drafting correspondence, preparation of presentations, travel arrangements, processing invoices, and other general office and clerical duties); scholarly research on artists and acquisitions; preparation and writing of didactic texts; serving as liaison with the Curator’s internal and external contacts, including artists, trustees, donors, scholars, and museum departments such as Conservation, Exhibitions and Collections Management, Publications, and Research Resources.

Job requirements: B.A. in art history (M.A. a plus) and 2 years institutional work history, or equivalent experience; skills related to TMS, Raiser’s Edge, Microsoft Office, Excel, and PowerPoint; outstanding organizational, writing, research, and communication skills, with attention to detail; facility in representing the Whitney at events at the Museum and beyond; ability to handle several projects simultaneously, work well as a member of a team, and meet deadlines.

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to: hr@whitney.org and state “Curatorial Assistant Contemporary” in the subject line.

For more information see http://whitney.org/About/JobPostings