CFP: Landscapes of Slavery, Landscapes of Freedom: The African diaspora and the American built environment

Harvard Graduate School of Design

November 5-7, 2021

Histories of the Atlantic world have focused both on the adaptation of ideas from the Old Continent to the new and on the material and cultural exchanges occurring throughout the centuries. To complement this scholarship, studies have been conducted on the slave trade between West Africa, mainland North America and the Caribbean, which formed the base of plantation economy and helped build the fortunes of many landowners in the colonial and antebellum period of the republic. Recent scholarship has acknowledged the violence of the archive of white records of slavery that have silenced the voices of the enslaved, and this work has sought to recover the experiences and vantage points of slavery’s victims.

This forum will address a more specific set of questions that have to do not only with the unique contribution the forced labor of the African diaspora and Afro-descendants brought to the plantation economy, but also with the potential exchange of knowledge about gardening and cultivation practices across the Atlantic, both from West Africa and between the Caribbean and mainland North America. On occasion the cultivation of specific staple crops such as rice depended upon the expertise of the enslaved. More generally, many of those forced to labor on their masters’ plantations simultaneously worked on small plots of land within their quarters, enabling them to exercise limited agency with regard to the extent and type of crop cultivation for their own use and consumption. When slavery legally ended, the exploitation of black labor continued, although over time black land-ownership increased and perhaps involved different approaches to land use than was common among white small-holders. Reconstructing these histories and those of the environments Africans built and cultivated for others and for themselves is challenging, as there is only a limited archival record that contains few enslaved voices.

This conference seeks to engage with the work of archaeologists, ethnobotanists, cultural geographers, anthropologists, and of experts in African American Studies and oral history in order to form a more complete picture of the African contribution to the shaping of the North American landscape.

Proposals for unpublished papers are welcome from scholars in any field. Topics might include (but are not limited to) such subjects as:

• the relationship between place-making and slave labor in North America and its cultural, social and economic underpinnings.

• the adaptation of imported African horticultural and agricultural knowledge in the Caribbean and North America.

• the exchange of knowledge related to agricultural and gardening practices between the Caribbean and the North American mainland.

• Atlantic World foodways.

• crop cultivation and food growing practices on plantation sites indebted to forced labor.

• the ways in which slavery and forced labor made intensive cultivation and production possible.

• the place-making of former slaves in both rural and urban environments.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words are to be headed with the applicant’s name, title of the paper, professional affiliation, and contact information. A two-page CV should also be included in the submission. Please send proposals by March 15, 2021 to: Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University. Email: rfabiani@gsd.harvard.edu

Authors of accepted proposals will be required to submit the complete text of their papers by June 15, and carry out potential revisions by August 30, 2021, after which the symposium chair will circulate them among the speakers. Publication of the essays presented at the conference is anticipated.

CAA2021 | 20 Years of Critical Race Art History

ACRAH will be at CAA2021. Even though CAA will be virtual, we are participating. To find out about the conference and the virtual format, visit the CAA conference portal:
https://caa.confex.com/caa/2021/meetingapp.cgi/Home/0

We are celebrating our 20th anniversary with an interview between ourselves, your founding co-directors, and two emerging scholars Melanee Harvey, Howard University, and julia neal, UTexas-Austin. Plus we have some reflections from a range of scholars on how critical race art history informs their work. Our session information is on the following page of the CAA Conference portal:
https://caa.confex.com/caa/2021/meetingapp.cgi/Session/8073

The interview and presentations will be available on the CAA website for advanced viewing on February 5th, 2021. The live q&a for the session is on Friday, February 12, 2021 at 6pm.

LEC: “An Immigrant’s View: Ben Shahn Paints America”

“An Immigrant’s View: Ben Shahn Paints America” with Diana Linden, Ph.D.

Wednesday, February 10 at 6 pm EST

Free; Registration required


Join us virtually for a discussion with Diana Linden, Ph.D. as she explores the life and art of Ben Shahn (1898-1969). Born in Lithuania, Shahn immigrated to New York with his family at six years old. He apprenticed with a lithographer at a young age and studied for a short time at the National Academy of Design as well as the Art Students League. Shahn’s career took off beginning in the 1930s, which is the decade Linden’s conversation centers on. The event is free, but donations are greatly appreciated. Registration is required.

Dr. Diana L. Linden is the author of Ben Shahn’s New Deal Murals: Jewish Identity in the American Scene (2015) along with many other works on Shahn, New York City Jewish artists, and New Deal Art. In 2019, she won the Frost Essay Award for best article in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s journalAmerican Art. She has also previously written on the Renee & Chaim Gross Foundation for The Magazine Antiques

In celebration of the centennial of Chaim Gross’s immigration to the United States, the Foundation is focusing our 2021 programming on illuminating the stories of artists and immigrants in the collection. Our winter and spring programming is centered around Eastern European emigrants.

LEC: Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900

Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900
Zoom Roundtables, Friday February 26 and March 5, 2021 from 5-7 PM UK time.
Organized by the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies at Durham University

What were the opportunities and limitations in late nineteenth-century Paris for artists (broadly defined) who were not white and male?

This pair of events brings together research presentations and roundtable discussion in response to passages from art historian Emily C. Burns’s book-in-progress, Performing Innocence: Cultural Belatedness and U.S. Art in Fin-de-Siècle Paris. Burns analyzes how the encounters in the French capital reshaped American culture, fueled by the idea that the US had no culture, no history, and no tradition. The sections were pre-circulated to participants and will be briefly summarized at the start of the Feb 26 event.

Friday, Feb 26

Emily C. Burns, Associate Professor of Art History, Auburn University / Terra Foundation Visiting Professor, University of Oxford
“Introduction: Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900”

Adrienne L. Childs, Associate, The Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University
“Cordier’s Caryatids: Laboring Black Bodies and the Sumptuous Second Empire Interior”

Susan Waller, Professor Emerita, Department of Art & Design, University of Missouri, St. Louis / Adjunct Professor of Art History, Maine College of Art
“Muslim Models in Nineteenth-century Paris”

Kirsten Pai Buick, Professor of Art History, University of New Mexico
“Don’t Look Back: African and African Diasporic Entanglements with France”

Friday, Mar 5

Peter Gibian, Associate Professor of English, McGill University
“Elle s’affiche”: Women Performers Pushing the Limits—Daisy Miller, Virginie Gautreau [Mme. X], Isadora Duncan”

Juliet Bellow, Associate Professor of Art History, American University
“Rodin and Hanako: Behind the Mask”

Renée Ater, Provost Visiting Professor, Africana Studies, Brown University
“Meta Vaux Warrick in Paris, 1899-1902”

JOB: Asst Prof, Archaeology/Native Peoples @ Boston University

The Department of Anthropology and Program in Archaeology at Boston University invites applications for the position of Assistant Professor (tenure-track) with a focus on the archaeological study of Native peoples of the Americas, beginning Fall 2021. We seek specialists in the material culture of precolumbian or early colonial Native peoples of North, Central, or South America. Indigenous approaches to archaeology are especially welcome. Preferred technical specialties include geospatial and digital methods of archaeological analysis, or bioarchaeology. We will give greater consideration to archaeologists whose scholarship and teaching complement current faculty and bridge cognate campus programs, including American and New England Studies and/or Latin American Studies. Successful applicants will have evidence of an ongoing research program (field, lab, and/or museum/archival), evidence of teaching effectiveness, and evidence of a commitment to increasing diversity and fostering inclusion in academia.

Boston University strives to create environments for learning, working, and living that are enriched by racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. For full consideration in this position we expect an active record of publication, teaching experience, a willingness to participate actively in student advising, and a commitment to the department’s and university’s institutional values regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion. Application materials should be submitted through Academic Jobs Online academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/17095 by December 20, 2020, and should include a cover letter, current CV, teaching portfolio, and contact information for three references. In the cover letter and teaching portfolio we invite candidates to explain how their teaching and mentorship activities work to increase student awareness of the Indigenous cultures of the Americas and contribute to more robust and inclusive intellectual discourse.

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor.

academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/17095

JOB: Asst. Prof. African American Art @ Emory

Assistant Professor of African American Art and Art History
Department of African American Studies

The Department of African American Studies at Emory University, Atlanta, GA, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of African American Studies specializing in Art and Art History.

We are searching for an innovative junior scholar with exceptional promise. The successful candidate will concentrate on African American art and art history and/or visual culture with varied emphases on art practices, theories, historiographies, digital humanities, and/or social movements. Scholars whose work engages African diasporic, intersectional Black Feminist, and Black Queer and Black Trans Studies are especially encouraged to apply, as are those scholars whose research also engages antiblackness, the Movement for Black Lives, structural racism, state surveillance and violence, and the carceral state.

The new hire will teach two courses per semester, including departmental surveys, specialized upper-level undergraduate seminars, and eventually graduate courses as the department expands to offer a Ph.D. in 2022. The new hire will also have the ability to cross-list courses with the Art History Department and also participate in advising graduate and undergraduate students.

The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to work in a diverse city hosting a rich array of cultural institutions. Atlanta is home to the APEX Museum, the High Museum of Art, the Hammonds House Museum, and the Trevor Arnett Art Gallery at Clark-Atlanta University, and Emory University features the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the African American Collection at the Rose Library, and the Arts and Social Justice Fellows Program.

Applicants should submit a cover letter (including discussion of the candidate’s research and teaching interests); CV; a statement about the applicant’s experience mentoring students from diverse backgrounds; and three letters of reference. Application deadline: December 15, 2020. Ph.D. is required by the time of appointment. For any questions about the position or the application process, please contact the search committee chair kali.gross@emory.edu.

All materials to be submitted via apply.interfolio.com/79715.

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

JOB: Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship

Applications are invited for the Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship for the 2021/22 academic year at Oxford University. This post, which is generously funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art, will be based in the History of Art Department (which is part of Oxford’s History Faculty) and is offered in association with a Visiting Fellowship at Worcester College.

This post provides an exciting opportunity to build on long-term research networks, encourage international collaboration, and inspire a new generation of American art academics and curators by further embedding the subject into Oxford’s research communities and its graduate and undergraduate curricula. The successful candidate will engage in advanced study and original research in the history of American art, give a series of four public lectures, and organise a study day. They will also teach one undergraduate and one graduate course, supervise a small number of Master’s theses, and contribute to the Department’s general teaching and administration.  

The successful candidate will hold a doctorate and teaching experience in a relevant field, have a strong research record and/or research potential with a reputation as an international authority within the specialism and a publication record at a standard that will contribute to and enhance the national and international profile of the History of Art Department and History Faculty.

Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates who are under-represented in academic posts in Oxford.

The post is fixed term for 12 months (or until 31 August 2022 whichever is sooner). The deadline for applications is 12 noon (UK time) on Friday 11th December 2020. Interviews are expected to take place via Microsoft Teams at the beginning of January 2021.

https://my.corehr.com/pls/uoxrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.display_form?p_company=10&p_internal_external=E&p_display_in_irish=N&p_process_type=&p_applicant_no=&p_form_profile_detail=&p_display_apply_ind=Y&p_refresh_search=Y&p_recruitment_id=148382

JOB: Assistant Professor of African American Art and Art History

The Department of African American Studies at Emory University, Atlanta, GA, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of African American Studies specializing in Art and Art History.

We are searching for an innovative junior scholar with exceptional promise. The successful candidate will concentrate on African American art and art history and/or visual culture with varied emphases on art practices, theories, historiographies, digital humanities, and/or social movements. Scholars whose work engages African diasporic, intersectional Black Feminist, and Black Queer and Black Trans Studies are especially encouraged to apply, as are those scholars whose research also engages antiblackness, the Movement for Black Lives, structural racism, state surveillance and violence, and the carceral state.

The new hire will teach two courses per semester, including departmental surveys, specialized upper-level undergraduate seminars, and eventually graduate courses as the department expands to offer a Ph.D. in 2022. The new hire will also have the ability to cross-list courses with the Art History Department and also participate in advising graduate and undergraduate students.

The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to work in a diverse city hosting a rich array of cultural institutions. Atlanta is home to the APEX Museum, the High Museum of Art, the Hammonds House Museum, and the Trevor Arnett Art Gallery at Clark-Atlanta University, and Emory University features the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the African American Collection at the Rose Library, and the Arts and Social Justice Fellows Program.

Applicants should submit a cover letter (including discussion of the candidate’s research and teaching interests); CV; a statement about the applicant’s experience mentoring students from diverse backgrounds; and three letters of reference. Application deadline: December 15, 2020. Ph.D. is required by the time of appointment.

For any questions about the position or the application process, please contact the search committee chair kali.gross@emory.edu. All materials to be submitted via https://apply.interfolio.com/79715.

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

CFP: Discovery @ Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference

DISCOVERY

The 42nd Annual Virtual Conference
Nineteenth Century Studies Association
March 11-13, 2021
Proposal Deadline: October 31, 2020

Website: ncsaweb.net/current-conference-2021-cfp/

NCSA welcomes proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, and special sessions that explore our theme of “Discovery” in the long nineteenth century (1789-1914). Scholars are invited to interrogate the trope of “discovery” by questioning the term’s ideological and colonial implications. Why was the concept of “discovery” so appealing in the nineteenth century, and what does its popularity tell us about the people and social structures that were so invested in it? Papers might also consider indigenous perspectives that challenge ideas of western “discovery” and settler colonialism, new voices that theorize and critique nineteenth-century “discoveries,” intellectual exchange between cultures, and other methods of unmasking narratives of exploration and “discovery.”

As an interdisciplinary organization, we particularly seek papers by scholars working in art/architecture/visual studies, cultural studies, economics, gender and sexuality, history (including history of the book), language and literature, law and politics, musicology, philosophy, and science (and the history of science). In light of the many changes in pedagogy, research, and the exchange of ideas we have all experienced this past year, we particularly welcome papers, panels, or roundtable topics that address discoveries in the use of technology for nineteenth-century studies and teaching.

Papers might discuss recovering forgotten manuscripts, or discovering new ways of thinking about aesthetic and historical periods. Scholars might explore not only the physical recovery of the past (archeology, geology), but also intellectual recovery as old ideas become new (evolution, neoclassicism, socialism, spiritualism). Papers might discuss publicizing discoveries (periodicals, lectures), exhibiting discoveries (museums, world’s fairs, exhibitions), or redressing the legacy of nineteenth-century practices (decolonization of museum collections and the repatriation of colonial-era artifacts). Other topics might include rediscovering and revisiting the period itself: teaching the nineteenth century, editing primary texts, and working toward diversity and social justice in the humanities. For more details, visit: ncsaweb.net/current-conference-2021-cfp/

CFP: Afro Gothic

Afro-Gothic: Black Horror and the Relentless Haunting of Traumatic Pasts
Call for Papers
For Afro-Gothic: Black Horror and the Relentless Haunting of Traumatic Pasts, we seek work that explores the Afro-Gothic as an aesthetic and as a means of working through the trauma of colonial slavery. Although the Gothic genre is widely discussed as a purely European literary tradition, the gothic manifests as a global phenomenon. Every culture possesses its own ghost stories, monster tales, or myths about creatures with supernatural powers. This project examines how the tropes of the gothic—with its constructions of the monstrous, the villainous, the mad and the haunted—take on wholly different valences when they are studied within the contexts of blackness, particularly under the modern colonial project. In our view, one important characteristic of the Afro-Gothic that distinguishes it from its European counterpart is its rootedness in lived black experiences. The Afro-Gothic often addresses the everydayness of black horror in ways that attest to the repetitive violence against black bodies and the relentless haunting of traumatic pasts.

We seek work that explores Afro-Gothic sensibilities in film, fiction, performance, and the visual arts. What we might call Afro-Gothic narratives have emerged lately in popular works by Jordan Peele (Get Out and Candyman), in the series Tales from the Hood (1995/2018) and Lovecraft Country (2020), Childish Gambino’s This is America, and Kara Walker’s antebellum silhouettes, to name just a few. We are interested in works that expand and explode current generic definitions of the Gothic and highlight the ways in which contemporary black artists are reckoning with aesthetics. In what ways does the Afro-Gothic serve to frame our understanding of the contemporary moment through a dark prism of organized terror?

Possible topics to explore might include (but are certainly not limited to):
• colonial hauntings – living among ghosts and the walking dead
• the plight of the hunted and state-sanctioned violence
• dark tourism and haunted houses
• maritime Afro-Gothic – nautical narratives
• medical experimentation and the trope of the mad scientist
• miscegenation, hybridity, and the bodily mash-up
• conjuring, the witch doctor and practitioners of the dark arts
• urban decay and environmentalism – climate crisis, toxicities, eco-gothic and natural disasters
• Afro-Gothic and new technologies, soundscapes, surveillance, cyber-haunting, ghost in
the machine
• menageries of the grotesque and public display of monstrosity

• cannibalization and ‘Eating the Other’
• sexual exploitation and gendered violence
• bondage, dungeons, incarcerations, and the restricted body

Essays must be written in English, but we encourage international submissions on all African Diasporic Afro-Gothic topics. Accepted works will be included in our proposal for a special issue of an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to black studies and aesthetics.

Please submit an abstract (300 words) along with a brief bio to afrogothiccfp@gmail.com.

The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2020.

Tashima Thomas, Editor Pratt Institute
Sybil Newton Cooksey, Editor New York University