The Grapevine

LEC: The Recovery Plan Conversation Series

STUDIO ARTS COLLEGE INTERNATIONAL
The Recovery Plan Conversation Series

Studio Arts College International (SACI) is delighted to announce The Recovery Plan Conversation Series: African Diasporic reflections rooted in Italy. Offered by Black History Month Florence (BHMF) and developed and moderated by SACI project leader and BHMF co-founder, Justin Randolph Thompson in collaboration with Museo MAGA Gallarate near Milan and with SACI, this 6 part series of critical conversations explores Afro-descendent perspectives on Italy through the partnering of 5 under-35 Afro-descendent artists living in Italy alongside 5 Afro-descendent Italian based scholars. Each paring of artist and scholar is established, in each instance, through a dynamic positioning of individual art work alongside research and archival findings in Italy on the basis of a common theme related to Blackness in the Italian socio-historical context. As one of multiple features of the project titled The Recovery Plan including the first museum solo exhibition for each of the artists that will be presented at MAGA over the course of the fall semester, Justin Randolph Thompson will moderate these 5 conversations between October and December. A sixth and final session will be a live and interactive conversation with Thompson accompanied by Janine Gaelle Dieudji, co-curator of The Recovery Plan, where they will be speaking about curatorial activism in the context of this project. A designated question and answer period addressing questions posed by online partcipants is designed to generate dialogue and reflections that can extend back to the classrooms or discussion groups of participating institutions.

SACI is dedicated to supporting diversity, inclusion and equity initiatives in Italy and is a strong supporter of BHMF as an organization including its Italian based project activities such as Black History Month Florence, Black Archive Alliance, and The Recovery Plan.

These projects are illustrative of the dynamic artistic and research activity taking place today in Italy and in Europe. We hope you will join us in these
critical conversations that highlight the seminal roles that, in tandem, artists and scholars can play in engaging in forms of social activism through the recuperation of silenced histories and untold stories of communities and of people, too often marginalized and excluded from local discourses and or national conversations.

Moderated Conversations and Dates
The Recovery Plan, in its pop-up version, serves as the foundation for an initiative by BHMF to develop a Black Cultural Center in Florence as a site dedicated to this work which will serve the community of Florence and
be pioneering as the first of its kind in Italy.

In each session, Thompson will guide a conversation in English with a paired artist and scholar on a different theme corresponding to their artistic, scholary, and archival work from The Recovery Plan. Exclusively registered participants will join the online conversation live via zoom. The artists and scholars will share virtual visits to the pop-up exhibition space at Museo MA*GA Gallarte which will serve as a backdrop to each respective conversation theme and as a reflection on artistic and academic forms of research, while the moderator will lead the dialogue providing contextual backdrops rooted in various periods of Italian history and contemporary society. All sessions will begin at 11 pm Central European Time and will be 90 minutes in length. The Conversations will take place every two weeks with the exception of the concluding discussion. The schedule, artist/scholar pairings, and themes are as follows:

Tuesday, Sept 29:
Italianness and the Colonial Gaze
Binta Diaw with Angelica Pesarini

Tuesday, Oct 13:
Spirituality in Diaspora
Raziel Perin with Simao Amista

Tuesday, Oct 27:
Coffee’s Materiality and Exploitation
Francis Offman with Jessica Sartiani

Tuesday, Nov 10:
Cameroonian Roots in Italy
Victor Fotso Nyie with Patrick Joel Tatcheda Yonkeu

Tuesday, Nov 24:
Jerry Masslo and Italian Based Anti Racist Activism
Emmanuel Yoro with Jordan Anderson

Tuesday, Dec 1:
Curatorial Activism
Justin Randolph Thompson and Janine Gaelle Dieudji


Registration and Fees

Universities can enroll in the complete series of 6 sessions or in one or more of the individual conversations. We highly recommend the entire offering as The Recovery Plan is a unique and groundbreaking initiative in Italy and as the 5 paired artist/scholar conversations followed by the unifying sixth and final session were purposefully selected and organized to provide participants with a comprehensive understanding of Blackness as considered through art, scholarship and archival work in the Italian socio-historical context and as linked to curatorial activism. We encourage and welcome all student, faculty, and staff of a registering institution to participate under a single university registration but ask that registering institutions extend these lectures to only student, faculty, and staff members of the registering instution’s community. Please contact Racini Aranda, SACI Director of Admissions to register or for additional questions about registration or payment information at RAranda@saci-florence.edu.

Fees:
Full Series: $995
Individual Conversation: $250
100% of proceeds go to funding The Recovery Plan and the artists and scholars associated with the project. As SACI’s goal is to ensure that this initiative is as broadly accessible as possible to all types of institutions, discounts are available on the basis of institutional need. Please contact Racini Aranda for questions related to institutional discounts.

CFP: Race and Representation in French Colonial Empire at AAH conference

CFP: Race and Representation in the French Colonial Empire
Co-convenors: Susannah Blair (Columbia University) and Dr Stephanie O’Rourke (University of St Andrews)
Contact details: seb2210@columbia.edu and so38@st-andrews.ac.uk

Abstract
This panel will consolidate new research on the visual culture of race in France and its colonies during the eighteenth century and into the nineteenth century. It will be oriented around two key terms, ‘representation’ and ‘possession’, and their many resonances­­ – artistic, political, legal, and relational. We invite papers to explore how art objects articulated, contested, and disseminated changing notions of racial identity and citizenship in France and its global networks.

Over the past several years, scholars have examined the role of pictorial representation in shaping ideas of race, identity, indigeneity, and slavery in the context of the eighteenth-century British empire. However, as Anne Lafont observes in her recent book (L’Art et la race, 2019), the French case has received relatively less sustained attention. Bringing together new scholarship that builds upon these precedents, we aim to address a deliberately expansive geographical notion of French visual culture, one that includes the Caribbean, New France, Canada, and the Indian Ocean in addition to sites within the ‘metropole’ such as Paris and Nantes. Fostering a dialogue between art history, indigenous studies, and critical race theory, our panel will provide a crucial scholarly platform for research that can inform pedagogy, curatorial practice, and future scholarship.

How to Submit a Proposal:
We invite proposals for 25-minute papers. At present AAH is planning a hybrid event that will involve a physical conference as well as a digital participation option for those who cannot or would prefer not to attend in person. We encourage submissions from those who intend to participate in a digital-only capacity as well as from those interested in attending in person. To submit a paper proposal, please fill out the proposal form (bit.ly/3eVYWZu)  and send it to seb2210@columbia.edu and so38@st-andrews.ac.uk by 19 October 2020. Please provide a title and abstract (250 words max), and a CV.  For more information, visit forarthistory.org.uk/our-work/conference/2021-annual-conference/

Clark Art Institute Research and Academic Program Special Fellowships (application deadline Oct. 15, 2020)

The Clark Art Institute’s Research and Academic Program (RAP) awards funded residential fellowships to established and promising scholars with the aim of fostering a critical commitment to inquiry in the theory, history, and interpretation of art and visual culture.

As part of our commitment to fostering diverse engagements with the visual arts, RAP particularly seeks to elevate constituencies, subjects, and methods that have historically been underrepresented in the discipline. In addition to Clark fellowships, RAP offers a number of special fellowships for specific research interests that are intended to nurture a variety of disciplinary approaches and support new voices in art history. These include:

Caribbean Art and Its Diasporas Fellowship
The Caribbean has been home to some of the most influential critical theorists, poets, writers, and artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This fellowship seeks to support art historians, artists, critics, and writers who are engaging with the complexity of critical Caribbean scholarship, art, and visual practices today.

Critical Race Theory and Visual Culture Fellowship
The emergence of critical race theory in legal scholarship and beyond demonstrated the systemic racism that structures American society based on white privilege and the legacy of white supremacy. In art history and visual culture, critical race theory has revealed the racist structures within the discipline and its institutions. This fellowship aims to support scholars who are working with critical race theory to integrate and reimagine new art histories while also engaging with the structural racism that has informed and built the discipline.

Futures Fellowship
This fellowship supports artists, educators, scholars, writers, and art critics who are reimagining the possibilities of museums, scholarship, and public engagement. Projects that examine social justice and the arts, reimagine the canon of art history, or consider the role of performance art in exposing erased histories are particularly welcome.

All fellows are provided offices in the open-stack, 280,000-volume art history library of the Manton Research Center; apartments in the gracious residence across the street from our 140-acre campus; reimbursement of travel expenses; and a stipend.

Applications due by October 15, 2020

For more information and application details, please visit clarkart.edu/rap/fellowship

CFP: “The ‘Long’ 18th Century” at Journal18/CAA2021

The “Long” 18th Century?

This issue of Journal18 takes off from the ubiquity of the phrase “the long nineteenth century.” Proliferating in calls for participation and panel descriptions–not to mention its prominent position in the description of this journal–if the mark of an elongated eighteenth century is inescapable, we propose that this terminology merits further scrutiny. What is meant by the “long” eighteenth century? From which vantage points, and for whom, is it long? And to what ends has this elongation been directed?

It is our contention that we must understand the rise of a “long” eighteenth century alongside the significant transformation of art historical inquiry into expanded geographical and cultural terrains. Since 2003, the study of eighteenth-century art has been enriched by a new commitment to “worlding,” even if decolonizing art histories remains an ongoing and incomplete project. As a result, habitual chronological slices, whether defined by European political history or by European stylistic shifts (e.g., Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassical), have been ripe for reconsideration as scholars have asked new questions about the transmission and sedimentation of practices, experiences, and art objects around the world. When the focus on histories of colonialism and slavery forces us to look anew at the bodies, lands, and knowledge presented in art, how do our narratives change and how do the sites and objects of our inquiry shift? What are the implications of this broadened scope of inquiry for habits of locution and the habits of mind that underwrite them? While the habitual slicing up of Britain’s eighteenth century to 1688–1815 is not that far out of alignment with France’s 1643–1815, it looks very different from the perspective of, for instance, South Asia, where an end point has tended rather to be located in the 1830s. What impact, if any, has a “worlding” of art history had upon our thinking about the relative length or shortness, narrowness or breadth, of the eighteenth century? What conceptually binds an eighteenth century once we have taken up the project of tracking the entanglements of art, commerce, and empire across worlds? For whom is the eighteenth century long, from what vantage points, whether local, regional, or transregional, and to what ends? And what relationship does this designation have to the equally omnipresent “long” nineteenth century, as well as to accounts of the Enlightenment, its seductions, and its repercussions?

We invite contributions that reflect upon a “long” and “broad” eighteenth century–its contours, analytic possibilities, and limits. We particularly welcome submissions that explore new models for tracking intellectual and artistic through-lines and inheritances, and that spur us to rethink periodization, or stylistic terminology that has been too often limited in its utility by being yoked to the goal of a successional narrative telos. Authors are encouraged to explore this wide-angle view by way of one term, one object, one phenomenon, or one margin. We welcome interventions that originate in art history or in other allied humanistic disciplines.

Issue Editors: Sarah Betzer, University of Virginia & Dipti Khera, New York University

Proposals for Journal18 issue #12 THE “LONG” 18TH CENTURY? are now being accepted.

To submit a proposal, send an abstract of 250 words (or 500 words for multi-authored proposals) and a brief biography to editor@journal18.org and sbetzer@virginia.edu.

Accepted participants will be invited to virtually convene for a panel in February 2021 under the auspices of the College Art Association annual conference for presentation and collaborative workshopping of their contributions.

Information on how to apply for CAA panel, sponsored by the American Society for 18th Century Studies, THE “LONG” 18TH CENTURY?:  https://caa.confex.com/caa/2021/webprogrampreliminary/meeting.html
Co-chairs: Sarah Betzer, University of Virginia and Dipti Khera, New York University
Email: sb4fg@virginia.edudipti.khera@nyu.edu

 

JOB: Tenure track, Photography at Carleton College

Carleton College invites applications for a tenure-track position in photography to begin September 1, 2021. This position will typically include teaching five courses per year over three 10-week terms.

About the Position:
We seek a colleague who will lead our course offerings in various photographic processes and media. In addition to offering courses in both digital and darkroom techniques, the ideal candidate will be able to clearly articulate connections between theory and practice and will embrace links between photography and other disciplines. The successful candidate will be well-versed in emergent post-photographic technologies and conversant in the contemporary discourse about image reproduction strategies. Candidates must be dedicated to teaching in a small, liberal arts college; committed to working closely with colleagues in the combined Art and Art History Department; and intent on forging collaborative relationships across disciplines.

Candidates are expected to maintain an active artistic or research agenda that buttresses their teaching in productive ways. While their teaching will focus on the production of still images, we welcome candidates whose own studio practice might emphasize new media explorations, including video and other time-based media in photography’s expanded field.

It is expected that candidates will hold a terminal degree in their field. We seek individuals with a demonstrated ability to work with students from a wide range of social and cultural backgrounds. Additionally, we welcome candidates whose professional work—in the classroom, in the studio, or in their service to the field—aligns with our commitment to examining systems of privilege and oppression.

About the Department of Art and Art History:
The Art and Art History Department at Carleton offers two separate majors (in Studio Art and Art History) as well as one minor (in Art History). The core mission of the Studio Art program is to introduce students to the tools and processes of artmaking, and help them develop their own creative abilities. We share a commitment to the value of traditional manual skills while encouraging experimentation and an expansive and expanding idea about art’s role in the broader culture. The Department is housed in Boliou Memorial Hall and features studios devoted to photography, ceramics, metalsmithing, painting and drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and woodworking. The department also maintains studio space in the Weitz Center for Creativity, Carleton’s state-of-the-art, multidisciplinary center for the arts, which also houses the Perlman Teaching Museum and multiple uniquely flexible work and performance spaces. The mission of the Weitz is to serve as a working laboratory for creativity not only within the arts, but across the entire curriculum.

About Carleton College:
Carleton is a highly selective liberal arts college that is home to a close-knit community of teacher/scholars devoted to the teaching and mentoring of approximately 2,000 highly motivated students chosen from a diverse pool of national and international applicants. The College is located in Northfield, Minnesota, a historic town 45 miles south of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis/St. Paul, a vibrant cultural center containing world-class artistic and educational institutions.

Carleton College is committed to developing its faculty to better reflect the diversity of our student body and American society. Women and members of groups historically underrepresented in academia are strongly encouraged to apply. Carleton College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, marital status, veteran status, actual or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, status with regard to public assistance, disability, or age in providing employment or access to its educational facilities and activities.

How to Apply:
To apply, please visit the Carleton College Web site at https://jobs.carleton.edu and submit an online application, including: a letter of application; CV; a statement outlining your philosophy of teaching visual art in a liberal arts environment; and statement outlining your artistic or research agenda. You should also upload samples of your creative work as well as contact information for three letters of reference written specifically for this position. DEADLINE: Applications will be evaluated starting November 15, 2020 and will continue until the position is filled.

 

Forsyth Postdoctoral Fellowship in Art History (2021-22): University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

The Department of the History of Art at the University of Michigan invites applications for the Forsyth Postdoctoral Fellowship, dedicated this year to Afro-Diasporic, African American, and Native American/ Indigenous/First Nations arts and visual cultures. Especially welcome are applicants proposing new critical conversations across disciplines, connecting art history to the environment, philosophical humanities, medicine, science and technology, religion, museology, and other creative realms.

The one-year appointment begins September 1, 2021, with possible one-year renewal. A PhD in a relevant specialization, acquired within the past five years, is required before appointment. The Forsyth Fellow will teach two courses per year. They will work with a mentor, who will help open doors to the UM community, providing guidance as requested or needed.

Applicants should provide a cover letter, CV, research plan, teaching statement, dissertation abstract, writing sample (35 pages maximum), and three letters of reference. Submit materials via Interfolio (https://apply.interfolio.com/77637) by December 15, 2020.

For further information, please contact Jessica Pattison (Executive Secretary, Department of the History of Art) at histart-execsec@umich.edu. Candidates from underrepresented communities are strongly encouraged to apply; the University of Michigan is a public R-1 institution committed to core values of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

CFP: “No Template: Art and the Technicity of Race” [MEDIA-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus] (updated deadline for submissions Jul. 31, 2020)

Media-N CFP – No Template: Art and the Technicity of Race

UPDATED Deadline for submission of abstracts: July 31, 2020

A decade ago, Beth Coleman and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun introduced the concept of race and/as technology.* Turning to Heidegger’s notion of techne as prosthesis or skill, Coleman and Chun imagine race itself as a technology that can be leveraged, a tool for navigating systems of power. This distances race from its mythological status as biological fact, creating a critical framework that returns historical agency to the individual and helps us understand how race and ethnicity function in the visual–and technological–world.

Recently, the concept has received renewed attention as the intersections between race and ethnicity and the technological have come to the fore in popular discourse, raised by issues ranging from representation in film to bias in facial recognition. Critical work by scholars such as Simone Browne and Lisa Nakamura and the Precarity Lab has also continued to interrogate the technicity of race and its relationship to other technologies, both historical and contemporary. Artistic research and practice on the subject, however, has often been either neglected or instrumentalized as illustrative of a larger debate.

This special issue of Media-N responds to the urgent need to examine the state of dialogue on race and/as technology in art practice, history, and criticism. It will feature a ten years on reflection on the concept by Beth Coleman, opening discussion onto the way this framework has shaped, and has been shaped by, art of the past and present.

We seek contributions that explore how art sheds light not only on the relationship between race, ethnicity, and the technological, but on race itself as, in the words of Coleman, “a disruptive technology that changes the terms of engagement with an all-too-familiar system of representation and power” (178). Issues to consider include, but are certainly not limited to:

The impact of the race and/as technology hermeneutic on artistic research and practice of the past decade.

The influence of visual technologies and aesthetic practice on discourses surrounding sociohistorical concepts like blackness and brownness.

The imaging of historical and/or contemporary flows of migration and diaspora.

International communication media and tensions between the global/local.

The use of visual technologies to negotiate power between citizens and the state.

Light and color bias in the material/processes/procedures of photography, film, and digital media.

Bias and violence in both the inputs and outputs of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Anxieties about race and visual truth sparked by technologies ranging from DNA testing to deepfakes.

Ethnicity and surveillance capitalism after 9/11–and/or the long tail of surveillance capitalism inaugurated under trans-Atlantic slavery and European colonialism.

Submissions addressing artistic practices from any time period or region are welcomed from scholars, critics, artists, designers, scientists, media-makers, and interdisciplinary researchers from across the humanities and sciences.

*See Beth Coleman, “Race as Technology,” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies 24, no. 1 (70) (May 1, 2009): 176-207; and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, “Race and/as Technology, or How to Do Things to Race,” in Race After the Internet, eds. Lisa Nakamura, Peter Chow-White, and Alondra Nelson (New York: Routledge, 2012), 38-60.

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Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus (ISSN: 1942-017X) is a scholarly, invitational, and double blind peer-reviewed journal. The journal provides a forum for scholarly research, artworks and projects, and is open to submissions in the form of papers, reports, and reviews of exhibitions and books on new media art. Media-N is an English language journal, and all submissions must be received in English adhering to the standards set by the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

TIMELINE:
July 31, 2020: UPDATED Deadline for submission of abstracts.
August 1, 2020: Notification of accepted proposals and invitation to submit paper.
December 15, 2020: Projected deadline for submission of final papers.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES:
Please send your proposal by email with the following information combined into a single document:
-Proposal title, and a 300-500 word abstract, plus 1-2 images if desired.
-Please include your name, email, and title/affiliation on abstract.
-A condensed CV (no longer than 3 pages).
NOTE: Materials should be submitted in English, as a Word document or PDF.
File should not exceed 5MB.

SEND INQUIRIES & SUBMISSIONS TO:
Megan Driscoll, Special Issue Guest Editor: md@megandriscoll.net 
Johanna Gosse, Executive Editor: johannagosse@gmail.com

CFP: Materializing Race: An ‘Unconference’ via Zoom

Do you study material culture in the Americas before 1830 or know someone who does? Dr. Cynthia Chin and I are excited to announce Materializing Race: An ‘Unconference’ on Objects and Identity in #VastEarlyAmerica! This participant-driven, lightning round-style event will be held in late August via Zoom, with two approximately two-hour afternoon sessions. We welcome interdisciplinary approaches to historical constructions of race and their material legacies in North, Central, and South America and the Caribbean. Presentations will be made in English.

Feel free to be in touch with any questions, submissions can be sent to materializingrace@gmail.com. For more information and submission details, please visit www.cynthiachin.com/materializingrace.

CFP: “Forum: Blind Spots” at Panorama

“Forum: Blind Spots” at Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Inspired by current efforts to reckon with ongoing, systemic racism, we invite proposals for a forum in Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art (Fall 2020) focused on blind spots, especially but not only related to race, that condition and constrain our research and writing. How might unexamined assumptions at the heart of our work in the academy and museum inadvertently perpetuate biases, stereotypes, and generalizations we mean to dismantle in and well beyond art history?

We welcome responses to that question, however uncomfortable, informed by critical race, postcolonial, feminist, queer, and Marxist perspectives, among others, and attentive to the social implications of our practice. To highlight how even revisionist projects can consolidate a monolithic model of subjectivity they aim to deconstruct, we encourage potential contributors to examine blind spots and their consequences in influential art historical projects and/or their own research. We envision a forum that represents a range of viable models for the kind of productive self-criticality for which the moment calls.

Panorama’s forums of this sort comprise “short polemical statements of about 500 to 1,500 words,” often in a personal voice, and related, whole or in part, to visual and material culture of the Americas (see journalpanorama.org). Please send your essay and curriculum vitae as a single pdf document to Anne Monahan and Isabel Taube (blindspot.panorama@gmail.com) by 15 August 2020; we will respond by 1 September 2020.

Questions?
Please contact us at blindspot.panorama@gmail.com.

CFP: Geoffrey Holder Anthology Project

In 1952 Geoffrey Holder took fifteen dancers from his Holder Brothers dance company to the first Caribbean Festival of the Arts in Puerto Rico. It was the first time he was not in an English-speaking Caribbean island and therefore able to see his native Trinidad in relief. There he met and saw artists and dancers perform from other parts of the region such as the great Haitian dancers Celestin and Jean-Léon Destiné. This festival served as Holder’s full artistic awakening as a Caribbean creative. From here on in, he would express an abiding faith in a creative process defined by crossing intellectual, artistic, geographic and conceptual boundaries in ways Caribbean people lived but perhaps took for granted. For Holder, learning to create in the fire of creolizing Vodoun beliefs and practices, Christianity, Buddhist theosophy, fine art histories and practices,, specifically painting, and notions of the folk in service to a sublime aesthetic opened his thinking in transformative ways. He was never the same.

While in Puerto Rico, Holder and his troupe auditioned for the American dancer and choreographer Agnes de Mille and as result of this encounter, they were invited to New York to audition for Sol Hurok. The group arrived in NYC in the spring of 1953. Holder and his brother, the painter Boscoe Holder, who had arrived in NY a few years earlier before leaving for London. The Holder brothers were part of a new wave of Post WWII migrants from the Caribbean that made their way to global cities in the 1950s and 60s for greater opportunities. Taken by the energy of the city, Holder reflected on that time of arrival; “…I knew I could make it here. I just backed myself up against the wall and saw the whole thing and I knew that this was my place. I belonged here.”

Geoffrey Holder does not fit into a single disciplinary home, and as such, presents a problem of methodology. Though he viewed painting as the anchor for everything he accomplished, in the public eye he has historically been treated as a dilettante. This edited publication focuses on the life and work of Holder from his early years in Trinidad to his death in the city to which he belonged some sixty years after he first arrived. It seeks to engage the complexity of this figure and address what we see as an error of interpretation. Our aim is to generate new critical work and new methods to engage the full range of his practice as a painter, dancer, actor, choreographer, director, costume designer, photographer, collector and artist. The print publication and its accompanying digital platform will be focused on cultivating scholarship and a critical archive on the work of an interdisciplinary, African diasporic creative whose multidimensional practice constituted parts of a highly conscious vision.

We invite poets, writers, performers and scholars to engage and rethink the broad expanse of Geoffrey Holder’s life’s work and submit a current CV and chapter abstracts of no more than 500 words that address one of the themes listed below, or a topic of one’s own choosing. Draft chapters are not to exceed 7500 words.

Access to the Holder archives at Emory University, the Smithsonian Museum of African American History and Culture and his estate in New York City will be facilitated for all selected writers during project development.

PROJECT TIMELINE
Deadline for Abstract submission: July 31, 2020
Notification of acceptance: September 18, 2020
First Drafts Due: July 16, 2021

ABSTRACT TOPICS INCLUDE BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING • The concept of Caribbean and diasporic aesthetics in Holder’s work • Holder and 1952 Caribana in Puerto Rico • Trinidad arts in the 1930s and 40s – Geoffrey Holder; Beacon Group; Trinidad Arts Society • Artistic and life partnership with Carmen de Lavallade • Holder and de Lavallade’s work with Josephine Baker in the 1960s • Carl Van Vechten’s photographs of Holder and his family at the Beinecke Library at Yale • Various bodies of Holder’s artwork – Portraiture, Trinidad Murals, Paintings of women, Paintings of men – Photography projects Adam (published) and Eve (unpublished) – Collage work from his final years etc. • France as a creative space for Holder and other Black creatives (1950-1970) • Dance and choreography; ie. “Dougla” for the Dance Theatre of Harlem (Footage available) and relationship to Jean-Léon Destiné’s Slave (1949), Alvin Ailey, Katherine Dunham and Caribbean dance from the period • Historicizing Holder’s generation of global Caribbean creatives • Holder as a fashion designer and de Lavallade as muse (All dresses and photographs of Ms. de Lavallade in them are available for close examination) • Black male modelling in 1950s through Holder’s work for Vogue and GQ in the 50s • Work on the Broadway production of The Wiz – Place in the history and politics of black Broadway; Music; Choreography; Costume design; impact of AIDS on the black creative community of the period. • Broadway production of Timbuktu – Music; Dance; Costume; Eartha Kitt • Holder’s deep and abiding interest in Haitian culture. His friendship with Maya Deren • Selling the exotic: – Film work (Live and Let Die, Annie, Boomerang etc.) – Commercial and print ads • Holder as Art Collector: Haitian, African, Modern and Intuitive Art • Differencing the canon – Teaching Holder; Collecting Holder; Curating Holder

Email questions & submissions to ghbp2021@gmail.com with “Geoffrey Holder Project” in the subject line.