The Grapevine

CFP” “Dark Amusements: Turn-of-the-Century American Spectacles and Race” @ SECAC 2021

Please consider submitting a proposal to the SECAC 2021 panel, “Dark Amusements: Turn-of-the-Century American Spectacles and Race”

The U.S. at the turn-of-the-century marked a period of profound technological and societal transformations. This session will examine the growth of spectacles in response to these sweeping changes. This marked a turning point in the U.S., where people’s interests shifted, as David Nye points out, from a fetishization of the “natural sublime” to the “technological sublime.” This change, spurred by the myriad inventions and innovations flooding the consumer market, led to new ways of seeing, and new forms of entertainment. These new forms of entertainment often took the shape of public spectacles and popular amusements. This session will examine how the burgeoning American spectacle culture celebrated American ingenuity, on the one hand, while simultaneously re-inscribing and reinforcing racial hierarchies. In the post-Reconstruction era, when white anxiety about the status of people of color within American society was at its zenith, spectacles were used to circulate and naturalize racist ideologies about white superiority. The repercussions of this expression of hegemonic power by European Americans will likewise be examined. Potential paper topics may include, but are not limited to, panoramas, world’s fairs, early cinema, vaudeville, minstrelsy, amusement parks, Wild West shows, or the perverse spectacles of lynching postcards and before and after photographs from Indigenous boarding schools.

SECAC 2021 in Lexington, KY – November 10-13
Abstracts due May 4. 2021
Conference and submission details can be found by following this link: secacart.org/page/Lexington

SYMP: Teaching the ‘Long’ 18th Century


https://virginia.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_qPSWyVTlSzCdu6PkVWVUlw

JOB: Visiting Prof @ Portland State University

Portland State University College of the Arts and the School of Art + Design invite applications for the James DePreist Visiting Professorship. One of the first African-American conductors on the world stage, James DePreist helmed orchestras from Amsterdam to Tokyo and is credited with building the Oregon Symphony into one worthy of international acclaim. A National Medal of Arts winner, poet and educator, Mr. DePreist demonstrated a lifelong commitment to the power of arts education and the importance of equal access. This Professorship seeks to perpetuate his exemplary spirit by supporting inclusive experiences and diverse, non-western perspectives in art and design education.

The teaching focus of each new Professorship is determined by the current needs of the School of Art + Design in concert with the interests and expertise of the successful candidate. For the 2021-2023 position we seek a scholar with an active record and expertise in African Diaspora or Native American/Indigenous art history of any time period, including contemporary.

This is a 1.0 FTE, two-year position, renewable for a maximum total of four years. The position begins September 16, 2021.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

Full-time Fixed Term position teaches 9 classes (36 credits) during the three-quarter academic year. Instructional workload reduction may be made to accommodate recruitment and outreach activities, advising and mentoring students, committee work, curriculum or special program development.

The successful candidate will have an active scholarly research agenda; a commitment to teaching the introductory art history survey as well as upper-division courses in the area of his/her/their expertise; and an interest in the possibility of engaging local collections of pertinent material, for example the Native American holdings of the Portland Art Museum.

To apply, please submit:

A letter of interest. 
A CV.
A statement of teaching philosophy.
A statement of research interests.
Evidence of teaching effectiveness.
Writing sample(s).
Full contact information for three references (including phone numbers and email addresses).

Review of applications will begin April 12th, 2021 and will continue until the finalists are identified. Incomplete applications will not be reviewed.

For further information, please contact Professor Alberto McKelligan Hernández at alberto6@pdx.edu or (503) 725-3366.

https://jobs.hrc.pdx.edu/postings/34365

JOB: Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and Educational Technologist @ St. Francis College

St. Francis College, Brooklyn (the “College”) is embarking on an ambitious plan to revitalize even as it remains true to its core mission: private, independent, co-educational, urban college whose Franciscan and Catholic traditions underpin its commitment to academic excellence, spiritual and moral values, social responsibility, justice and life-long learning. We are committed to diversity, equity and inclusion and we serve one of the most diverse student populations in New York City and the country. Candidates who have the professional skills, experience, and/or the willingness to engage in teaching, collaborative research, and community service with our diverse student body are particularly sought.

Position Summary: The College is seeking to build new digital projects into the curriculum. Accordingly, the Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and Educational Technologist requires thinking imaginatively about how the College can create a vibrant interdisciplinary, inclusive digital learning and research space. To that end, the position will work with a diverse student body and faculty to develop new digital projects, identify digital tools to support specific research and curriculum needs, work to eliminate barriers and increase equity, and provide project development support. In addition, the successful candidate will design and facilitate digital literacy workshops for students and faculty and will stay current on the latest technologies and platforms, consult with the appropriate specialists when necessary, and consult about the acquisition of hardware, software, web hosting, data preservation and access, and security matters.

The College is therefore seeking a highly motivated educator who will teach two courses per semester in their area of specialization and/or an Introduction to Digital Humanities course, and will also serve as educational technologist for the College. This position will work in collaboration with the College’s new Center for Teaching, Learning, and Faculty Development and will work with faculty across the disciplines to design and implement digital learning and research initiatives that ensure equity and access for our students and community. We seek a colleague with a strong commitment to undergraduate interdisciplinary education in a diverse and vibrant community.

Commensurate with a faculty appointment at the Assistant Professor level, the successful candidate will also be expected to conduct research, mentor students, and participate in College-wide and departmental service. In addition, St. Francis College places special emphasis on providing students research and internship opportunities.

Anticipated Start Date: Fall Semester 2021

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Ph.D. in a humanities field. ABD candidates will be considered if degree will be completed by August 2021.
  • Two years’ experience working in digital humanities and building digital projects.
  • Two years’ teaching experience.
  • Ability/willingness to teach interdisciplinary courses.
  • Culturally sensitive, caring and friendly with a deep understanding and appreciation of an inclusivecollege community and the Franciscan traditions of St. Francis College.
  • Ability to work with a diverse student, faculty and staff population.
  • Understanding and support of the mission of St. Francis College.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Experience with digital pedagogy, geospatial humanities, digital publishing, digital archiving, and data visualization.
  • Experience with Adobe Suite with a focus in InDesign and Adobe Premiere.
  • Experience working in teams.
  • Experience working to advance diversity, equity and inclusion.

Review of applicants will begin in March 2021 and will continue until the position is filled. Interviews will be conducted interviews via Zoom. After initial review, applicants may be asked to provide additional materials. Women and candidates and persons from underrepresented diverse backgrounds and experiences are strongly encouraged to apply.

About St. Francis College: For 160 years, St. Francis has been driven by dreams-powered by big ideas, bold ambitions, and the courage to bring them to life. Located on a dynamic campus at a global crossroads, St. Francis College invites students to learn in the heart of Brooklyn, an exhilarating mix of cultures and neighborhoods, home to innovative starts, storied organizations, and the city’s largest concentration of college students. The College strives to offer ample opportunities for students to immerse themselves in the intellectual, cultural and professional opportunities afforded by New York City, and to serve the needs of the local community in which they live and study.We educate the whole person for a full, relational life, developing the students’ talents and abilities to form confident alumni well prepared for graduate study, for meaningful, fulfilling careers, as well as for collaborative, service-oriented leadership.St. Francis College is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity employer and we are strongly committed to increasing the diversity of our faculty, students, and the curriculum. Qualified candidates of diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Interested applicants can apply by clicking here.

JOB: Managing Editor, American Art

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is accepting applications for managing editor of American Art, the peer-reviewed journal co-published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the University of Chicago Press. The position entails support to SAAM’s Research and Scholars Center, including management of rights and reproductions, peer-review, fact-checking, copyediting, proofing, and prize administration. The closing date is March 30, 2021.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/595128400
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/595128100
Additionally, interested applicants are encouraged to submit bids for the interim managing editor contract. The length of contract will depend on the timing for the permanent hire. To receive the Request for Quotes, Statement of Work, and instructions for submitting the bid, write to AmericanArtJournal@si.edu with the header “Interim Managing Editor.” The closing date for the interim contract is March 26, 2021.

JOB: Assistant Professor, Appalachian State University

Appalachian State University is looking for a specialist in Indigenous North or South American Art, Latin American Art, or Art of Africa/African Diaspora.

https://appstate.peopleadmin.com/postings/27429

James A. Porter Colloquium

Dear Supporters of the James A. Porter Colloquium:

We are pleased to announce that registration for the 31st Annual James A. Porter Colloquium is available at:
https://www.nga.gov/research/casva/meetings/porter-colloquium.html

The 31st Annual James A. Porter Colloquium on
African American Art and Art of the African Diaspora
“Defining Diaspora: 21st Century Developments in Art of the African Diaspora”
Friday, April 16, 2021, 4:30–6:00 p.m.

The 31st Annual James A. Porter Colloquium is co-presented by Howard University’s Department of Art, the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art and the David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at University of Maryland, College Park. This year’s virtual program will explore the theme “Defining Diaspora: 21st Century Developments in Art of the African Diaspora.” Sessions will investigate the ways in which visual artists and scholars are defining, and redefining, the aesthetic contours and possibilities of the African Diaspora in American art spaces. Started in 1990 by art historian Dr. Floyd Coleman, the Porter Colloquium is the foremost academic setting for innovative dialogue and perspectives from leading and emerging scholars, artists, curators, and cultural critics.

The National Gallery of Art will live-stream presentations with online audience Q&A on Friday, April 16, 2021, 4:30-6:00 PM. Online registration is available at: https://www.nga.gov/research/casva/meetings/porter-colloquium.html

Generous programming support has been provided by the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation and Michael Rosenfeld Gallery.
James A. Porter Colloquium on African American Art and Art of the African Diaspora
This event brings together artists and art historians to explore the aesthetic practices, critical issues, and art historical interpretations of the art of the African Diaspora. To celebrate the centennial of Howard University’s department of art, we are honored to cosponsor this event.
www.nga.gov

2021 Porter Colloquium Honorees and Distinguished Speakers
Lifetime Achievement Awards
Renée Stout, artist

Freida High W. Tesfagiorgis, Evjue-Bascom Emerita Professor of African and African American Art History & Visual Culture, Departments of Afro-American Studies and Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison

James A. Porter Book Award
Travel and See: Black Diaspora Art Practices Since 1980, by Kobena Mercer, Professor, History of Art and African American Studies, Department of the History of Art, Yale University

Full Program of Events

The 19th David C. Driskell Center Distinguished Lecture in the Visual Arts Series in Honor of David C. Driskell, hosted by The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora, University of Maryland, College Park

Thursday, April 15, 6:00 PM EST           (Register at: https://driskellcenter.umd.edu/)

Prof. Curlee Holton, Director and Artist-in-Residence, David C. Driskell Center for the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora

“What’s Next? David C. Driskell Artist/Scholar/Activist: A model for future role and practices of African American Artists”

Porter Colloquium Keynote Lectures, co-sponsored with the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art, livestreamed on CASVA website, April 16, 4:30-6:00PM (Register at:  https://www.nga.gov/research/casva/meetings/porter-colloquium.html)

Porter Colloquium Opening Lecture
Erica Moiah James, Assistant Professor, Department of Art and Art History, University of Miami
“Undress to Redress: African Diasporic Art History and Archives of Black Representational Bodies”

Keynote Lecture
Freida High W. Tesfagiorgis, Evjue-Bascom Emerita Professor of African and African American Art History & Visual Culture, Departments of Afro-American Studies and Gender & Women’s Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison
            “Reflections on My Personal/ Professional Journey That Continues Amid Crises”

James A. Porter Distinguished Lecture
Kobena Mercer, Professor, History of Art and African American Studies, Department of the History of Art, Yale University
“Flowback—How Africa is Redefining Today’s Diaspora”

Floyd Coleman Distinguished Lecture
Renée Stout, artist
           “Thank You for Talking to Me Africa: Trusting the Voice Within”

Artist Conversations (Available on Howard University Gallery of Art Porter Colloquium Website after 4/16; no registration necessary)

Willis “Bing” Davis in conversation with Akili Tomassino (Associate Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)

Aïda Muluneh and Larry Cook (Assistant Professor of Photography, Department of Art, Howard University) in conversation with Natalie Hopkinson (Associate Professor, Department of Communication, Culture and Media Studies, Howard University)

Please register and join us on April 15th and April 16th, 2021.

Part-time Fellowship (1-year) at Frick Art Reference Library (application due Apr. 30, 2021)

Part-time Fellowship

One-year part-time fellowship. The term of the award will begin in September 2021 and conclude in May 2022.

Summary

The Frick Collection and Frick Art Reference Library is pleased to announce the availability of a one-year part-time fellowship for an outstanding graduate student in art history, the digital humanities, computer science and/or information science. The successful candidate will complete a digital project (preferably Open Access) of their own design that utilizes the rich digital resources of the Library, especially The Frick Digital Collections, the institution’s online archive, and its Art History Research Databases. Ideally, this project would support research for the fellow’s master’s thesis or dissertation; however, projects for course credit and independent initiatives will also be considered. During the tenure of the fellowship, which will be held remotely, the fellow will also be closely involved in all activities and public programming sponsored by the institution’s Digital Art History Lab. At the conclusion of the fellowship, the Fellow will be required to present their project in an online public event scheduled for May 2022.

Qualifications and Application Process

Applicants must be enrolled in an accredited graduate program in the United States or Canada. The Fellow will receive a one-time stipend of $15,000. The Fellow will be considered a part-time employee for the duration of their fellowship. The term of the award will begin in September 2021 and conclude in May 2022.

Applications must include the following materials:

·         A cover letter explaining the applicant’s interest in the fellowship and the Frick Art Reference Library’s digital resources more broadly. The letter must include a home address, phone number, and email address

·         An abstract, not to exceed three typed pages double-spaced, describing the applicant’s proposed project

·         A complete curriculum vitae of education, employment, honors, awards, and publications

·         Two letters of recommendation (academic and professional)

Please submit application materials to dahlprograms@frick.org. Letters of recommendation should be sent to this email address directly from recommenders; PDFs of signed letters on university or business stationary are preferred.

The application deadline for the fellowship is April 30, 2021.

Finalists will be interviewed via video conferencing. The Library plans to make the appointment by May 31, 2021.

Benefits of a Fellowship with The Frick Collection

The Frick Collection offers excellent opportunities to appreciate some of the world’s finest works of art. All fellows of The Frick Collection may access free or discounted admission to most of New York’s museums. The Frick also provides employees, trainees, interns, fellows, and volunteers with a discount on Museum Shop purchases.

Equal Employment Opportunity has been, and will continue to be, a fundamental principle at The Collection, where employment is based upon personal capabilities and qualifications without discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, alienage or citizenship status, sexual orientation, disability, pregnancy, military status, creed, genetic predisposition or carrier status or any other protected characteristic as established by law. This policy applies to all terms and conditions of employment, including, but not limited to, hiring, placement, promotion, termination, layoff, recall, transfer, leaves of absence, compensation and training.

This description shall not be construed as a contract of any sort for a specific period of employment.

Museum Specialist—National Museum of African-American History and Culture (Smithsonian Institution) — application deadline Mar. 16, 2021

Americanists and/or contemporary specialists with interest in art made by US artists of African descent are encouraged to apply. Info here:

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/593868500

CFP: Landscapes of Slavery, Landscapes of Freedom: The African diaspora and the American built environment

Harvard Graduate School of Design

November 5-7, 2021

Histories of the Atlantic world have focused both on the adaptation of ideas from the Old Continent to the new and on the material and cultural exchanges occurring throughout the centuries. To complement this scholarship, studies have been conducted on the slave trade between West Africa, mainland North America and the Caribbean, which formed the base of plantation economy and helped build the fortunes of many landowners in the colonial and antebellum period of the republic. Recent scholarship has acknowledged the violence of the archive of white records of slavery that have silenced the voices of the enslaved, and this work has sought to recover the experiences and vantage points of slavery’s victims.

This forum will address a more specific set of questions that have to do not only with the unique contribution the forced labor of the African diaspora and Afro-descendants brought to the plantation economy, but also with the potential exchange of knowledge about gardening and cultivation practices across the Atlantic, both from West Africa and between the Caribbean and mainland North America. On occasion the cultivation of specific staple crops such as rice depended upon the expertise of the enslaved. More generally, many of those forced to labor on their masters’ plantations simultaneously worked on small plots of land within their quarters, enabling them to exercise limited agency with regard to the extent and type of crop cultivation for their own use and consumption. When slavery legally ended, the exploitation of black labor continued, although over time black land-ownership increased and perhaps involved different approaches to land use than was common among white small-holders. Reconstructing these histories and those of the environments Africans built and cultivated for others and for themselves is challenging, as there is only a limited archival record that contains few enslaved voices.

This conference seeks to engage with the work of archaeologists, ethnobotanists, cultural geographers, anthropologists, and of experts in African American Studies and oral history in order to form a more complete picture of the African contribution to the shaping of the North American landscape.

Proposals for unpublished papers are welcome from scholars in any field. Topics might include (but are not limited to) such subjects as:

• the relationship between place-making and slave labor in North America and its cultural, social and economic underpinnings.

• the adaptation of imported African horticultural and agricultural knowledge in the Caribbean and North America.

• the exchange of knowledge related to agricultural and gardening practices between the Caribbean and the North American mainland.

• Atlantic World foodways.

• crop cultivation and food growing practices on plantation sites indebted to forced labor.

• the ways in which slavery and forced labor made intensive cultivation and production possible.

• the place-making of former slaves in both rural and urban environments.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words are to be headed with the applicant’s name, title of the paper, professional affiliation, and contact information. A two-page CV should also be included in the submission. Please send proposals by March 15, 2021 to: Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University. Email: rfabiani@gsd.harvard.edu

Authors of accepted proposals will be required to submit the complete text of their papers by June 15, and carry out potential revisions by August 30, 2021, after which the symposium chair will circulate them among the speakers. Publication of the essays presented at the conference is anticipated.