The Grapevine

JOB: Africa/African Diaspora @ Courtauld

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in the arts of Africa and/or the African diaspora, within the broad period from c. 1800 to the present. This appointment offers an exciting opportunity to transform The Courtauld’s teaching and research, and to provide academic leadership in fields of critical importance to the discipline, within and beyond the institute. It is one of two new posts in this broad field, the other being a Professorship.

We invite applications from early and mid-career scholars with a profile in research and teaching commensurate with their career stage.

These posts are part of The Courtauld’s commitment to a more inclusive and diverse curriculum. They are generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Application is online. You will also need to include a CV and a supporting statement of no more than 1500 words. You should also give the names of 3 referees.

The supporting statement should set out how you meet the criteria of this position, and include a brief statement about your research profile. This should include your current and future research plans, your teaching plans and experience, your administrative experience, and potential to contribute to the research profile and impact of The Courtauld. Please address the criteria set out in the Person Specification when preparing your statement.

Interviews for the position will take place on Thursday 5th and Friday 6th December 2019.

If you would like an informal conversation about the roles please contact Dr Jo Applin, Head of Art History. jo.applin@courtauld.ac.uk

https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=323

 

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2020 RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP IN US ART at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College (Winter Park, Florida) — Apply Now!

The Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College seeks a Research Fellow in American Art. This is part-time (20 hours/week), non-residential position funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to develop, research, digitize and display the American collection. The Research Fellow will work with the Bruce A. Beal Director and members of the curatorial team to conduct in-depth and contextual research. Twin goals are to help re-position the collection for a broader audience, with research (including images, provenance, exhibition history, artist biographies, interpretation and bibliography) made available online; and to integrate the collection with both the teaching mission of the museum and with contemporary efforts to refine and widen the definition of American art.

Eligible candidates will have expertise in American art (ABD required, Ph.D. preferred) with a preference for a research focus in the 19th or 20th century. Experience teaching at the college level or curatorial experience in a university art museum a plus. The fellowship is for a 12-month period starting in January 2020; apart from a few weeks in residence in Winter Park, research can be conducted in any city providing that the fellow has access to major research libraries for American art.

To apply, please visit the Rollins career page https://jobs.rollins.edu/en-us/job/492968/research-fellow-american-art.

JOB: Assoc. Curator, American Art @ Harvard Art Museums

Please use this link to apply: Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Associate Curator of American Art

Theodore E. Stebbins, Jr., Associate Curator of American Art
Harvard Art Museums

Duties & Responsibilities
The Harvard Art Museums seeks a rising intellectual authority on pre-1900 American art. Tasked with organizing innovative exhibition and scholarly projects, the Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Associate Curator of American Art will work with a range of partners and collaborators. Engaging with scholarly and public debate on the Harvard University campus and beyond, the curator will help to complicate the art-historical narrative and propose fresh perspectives on the definition of American art for the 21st century.

The Theodore E. Stebbins Jr. Associate Curator of American Art will assume the full range of curatorial responsibilities for the important collection of American art pre-1900 at the Museums, including crafting an ambitious exhibition, research, and publication program, and working closely with students and faculty to foster significant and sustained curricular use of the collection for both undergraduate and graduate teaching. The curator functions successfully within a team environment and promotes dialogue, engagement, and collaboration with colleagues within the division and with curatorial departments that have overlapping collections holdings and expertise, as well as the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Study. The curator will also collaborate on selected projects, acquisitions, and displays of the collection with relevant curators of works-on-paper collections and European paintings in the Division of European and American Art, as well as with colleagues in the Division of Modern and Contemporary Art.

The curator works to promote and strengthen the presence of American art at the Museums and in the wider world, and works closely with fellows, interns, and junior staff towards this end. The curator recommends purchases and solicits gifts for the collection, works to diversify the collection, and assumes an active role in soliciting funds for museum purposes, including acquisitions, exhibitions, and publications, from individuals, foundations, federal agencies, and other sources.

The Collection:

Areas of recent growth in the pre-1900 American art collection include still life paintings by William Michael Harnett and members of the Peale family, as well as the acquisition of a rare portrait by Julien Hudson, a nineteenth-century painter of African descent working in New Orleans, and the purchase of an early stoneware jar by Dave Drake. Shown in galleries that mix media and schools of art from Europe and America, the American art collection at Harvard is both justly-celebrated in its own right and understood as part of a larger story of artistic expression in the west and beyond. Harvard University began acquiring American art in the seventeenth century, and the Museums contain nearly 3,000 paintings, sculptures, and works of decorative arts made in the Americas. The collection of late-seventeenth-century Boston silver is particularly significant, and the Museums represent almost every phase in John Singleton Copley’s painting career. Some of these works are part of the 1,300-strong University Portrait Collection, now overseen by curators at the Harvard Art Museums. The bequest of Grenville Winthrop in 1943 added a group of major works by nineteenth-century artists including Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, and James McNeill Whistler. The wider Harvard Art Museums hold strengths in nineteenth-century portrait photography, and American modernism, abstract expressionism, and color-field painting. While the Curator of American Art does not directly oversee these last areas, they may advise from the point of view of these objects’ relationship to the story of art-making in America. Works by indigenous artists from the Americas are held by Harvard’s Peabody Museum, and offer the potential for curatorial collaboration between the two institutions.

Basic Qualifications

Candidates MUST meet the following basic qualifications in order to be considered for this role:

Ph.D. in art history or related field; minimum of three years’ progressively responsible curatorial experience, teaching, or field-related experience. [All candidates who may be interested in the Stebbins curatorial position in American art and AT LEAST meet the basic qualifications should consider submitting an application.]

Additional Qualifications
Demonstrated record of scholarship and achievement in the field of American art pre-1900, and commitment to collaborating and playing an active role in a lively and rigorous university setting.

Demonstrated record of teaching, working with students, and/or mentoring preferred.

Demonstrated record of successfully working with donors, collectors, and museum patrons preferred.

Commitment to equity and inclusion in museum practice and to engaging with a wide range of audiences and constituencies.

Additional Information
The Associate-level position is a 5-year term position with the possibility of extension and promotion.

Call for Research Notes: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Research Notes
Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama seeks short works of original scholarship that bring new research discoveries, new museum acquisitions, or developing projects (academic, curatorial, and/or digital) to the attention of its readers.

Research Notes are usually written in the first person, and you are encouraged to express you excitement in the first paragraph. Research notes are approximately 2,500 words in length, and they can include footnotes and up to five illustrations. We see Research Notes as an opportunity to surface those great moments when something new comes to light. 

For further information and to submit your Research Note, please consult our submissions page.

Feel free to send your questions to:
Katelynn Crawford: kcrawford@artsbma.org
Kevin Murphy: kmm3@williams.edu
Erin Pauwels: erin.pauwels@temple.edu

“ONE PRESS, MANY HANDS: Diversity in the History of American Printing,” Oct. 25-27, 2019, University of Maryland (College Park)

Sign up for APHA’s first conference expressly devoted to the rich history of printing and publishing in America from diverse groups, with presentations that explore the intersections of printing history and the studies of Black, Jewish, and Latinx cultures, gender studies, and queer theory. Through lectures, panels, and workshops, participants will have the opportunity to engage with a critical exploration of the history of printing among America’s underrepresented communities.

REGISTER NOW! 

All are welcome; current APHA membership is not required for attendance. Please forward this e-mail to anyone you think might be interested in going. Registration fee: $150. Student rate: $100.

The conference this year has two keynote speakers: Kinohi Nishikawa, author of the 2018 book Street Players: Black Pulp Fiction and the Making of a Literary Underground; and the graphic designer and writer Colette Gaiter. Conference presentation subjects include: Spanish-language publishing in early 19th century New York; the construction of gender in early publishers’ bindings; slave labor in the print shop; the feminist possibilities of print; Fraktur and German nationalism in early American print culture; engravings and the illustrative renderings of skin color; hand-coloring in the production of 19th century Native American portraiture; and much, much, more.  

SEE FULL SCHEDULE HERE

APHA hopes to see you in College Park in October. Please don’t hesitate to contact them if you have any questions about the conference, or about APHA in general.  

JOB: African/African Diaspora/Latinx or Latin American; Asst Prof @ USC

University of Southern California (CA) – TT Assistant Professor of African and/or African Diasporic and/or Latinx and/or Latin American History of Art, Visual, and/or Material Culture, post-1750

The Department of Art History in the Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA) invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in African and/or African Diasporic and/or Latinx and/or Latin American history of art, visual, and/or material culture, post-1750. Applicants may conduct research in one or more of these areas, and various methodological and theoretical approaches are welcome. We have a particular interest in scholarship that contributes to increasing the diversity of the department’s intellectual life and offerings. This position is expected to begin August 2020.

The successful candidate will teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level and participate actively in the intellectual life of the department and the university. Candidates must possess a Ph.D. at the time of appointment and show exceptional scholarly promise. Interested candidates should provide 1) a cover letter that includes a discussion of research and teaching, 2) a curriculum vitae, 3) two writing samples, at least one of which should be a chapter from a dissertation or book manuscript, and 4) the names and contact information of three referees who will be contacted in a system-generated email to provide letters. In order to be considered for this position, applicants are required to submit an electronic USC application; follow this job link or paste in a browser: https://usccareers.usc.edu/job/los- angeles/assistant-professor-of-african-and-or-african-diasporic-and-or-latinx-and-or-latin-american- history/1209/13261319 . For full consideration, applicants are encouraged to apply by November 1, 2019.

USC is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, protected veteran status, disability, or any other characteristic protected by law or USC policy. USC will consider for employment all qualified applicants with criminal histories in a manner consistent with the requirements of the Los Angeles Fair Chance Initiative for Hiring ordinance.

 

JOB: Asst Prof, Modern/Contemporary @ Boston College

The Art, Art History, and Film Department at Boston College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor in the field of Modern and Contemporary Art of Europe and the Americas to begin July 1, 2020.

The department seeks candidates with robust and innovative research agendas and a commitment to undergraduate teaching. Applicants should specialize in 20th-century art and be able to teach courses that address art of the 21st century. The appointee will teach five courses each academic year, including an introduction to art history from the Renaissance to Modern and upper-level courses in the candidate’s areas of specialization. Of particular interest are candidates who can teach courses in one or more of the following areas: theory and methods of art history; history of architecture; and museum history, theory, and practice. The department also welcomes candidates whose research and teaching interests may include analysis of gender studies, critical race theory, post-colonial studies, and disability studies.

Faculty members have the opportunity to pursue exhibition projects at the McMullen Museum of Art and to incorporate Boston-area museums in their teaching. The department also encourages interdisciplinary instruction and teaching in the Core Curriculum.

Boston College is a Jesuit, Catholic university that strives to integrate research excellence with a foundational commitment to formative liberal arts education. The University encourages applications from candidates committed to fostering a diverse and inclusive academic community.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching philosophy, sample of recent scholarship, course syllabi, and three letters of recommendation by November 1, 2019. PhD expected by start date. All materials must be submitted to Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/66288.

 

 

Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide seeks DH Editor—Application Deadline Jun. 24, 2019

Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide (NCAW), a scholarly, refereed digital journal founded in 2002 and devoted to the study of international art and visual culture of the long nineteenth-century, is accepting applications for a digital humanities editor.

NCAW seeks a candidate with a broad view of nineteenth-century art and visual culture and with knowledge of the conceptual and practical field of digital humanities. Technological expertise is not required, though candidates should hold a PhD or have earned ABD status in a PhD program. Ideal candidates will express ongoing willingness to stay abreast of debates in the field of digital humanities as well as to identify and participate in professional development in the field. They should be intellectually-rigorous, detail-oriented, and willing to collaborate with authors and other members of the editorial team.

The digital humanities editor actively pursues digital humanities projects and works in a hands-on capacity with authors to develop the scholarly and digital aspects of their articles.

Specific responsibilities include:

·      reviewing proposals

·      creating production schedules and guiding articles from proposal to publication

·      communicating frequently with authors to provide feedback on developing digital components and scholarly texts

·      liaising with the journal’s web developer

·      managing peer reviews

A pioneer in digital publishing, NCAW is committed to publishing innovative digital projects and to integrating digital modes of data and image presentation in its bi-annual articles. You can find NCAW’s previously published digital humanities articles here:

https://www.19thc-artworldwide.org/digital-humanities-and-art-history

All positions on NCAW’s editorial board are voluntary.

Please send a letter of interest and a CV to the journal’s executive editor Isabel Taube at taubeisa[at]gmail.com

Deadline: June 24, 2019.

Giovanni Battista Piranesi. Awarded an NEH grant for 2019-2021 from the Division of Preservation and Access, The Digital Piranesi (digitalpiranesi.org) is based at the University of South Carolina (Columbia), where the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections owns a rare full 29-volume set of Piranesi’s complete works. Our project aims to make this interdisciplinary material accessible in a complete digital collection and, in an interactive digital edition, to illuminate and enact many of the graphic features of his innovative designs. A Ph.D. in a relevant discipline (including but not limited to Art History, History of Architecture, Classics, Comparative Literature, European History, Italian, Library and Information Science) is required to start work.

Please direct any questions to project PI Jeanne Britton: jbritton@mailbox.sc.edu

For the official job ad, and to apply, please see:

https://uscjobs.sc.edu/postings/57022

Luce Curatorial Fellowship at SAAM (Apply by July 15, 2019)

The Smithsonian American Art Museum seeks an outstanding emerging scholar of American art for a curatorial fellowship funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. Beginning in fall 2019, this two-year position, with a possible third-year renewal, will provide an invaluable professional development opportunity to a scholar interested in a curatorial career in an art museum. It will also support scholarly research on SAAM’s permanent collection, one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. The selected fellow will work under the supervision of an experienced curator and in collaboration with a team of staff from various departments on a major project. The appointee will develop practical skills in all four areas of curatorial practice: research, exhibition development, collections management and planning, and public service. He or she will also participate fully in the intellectual life of the museum’s Research and Scholars Center, home of its research fellowship program and journal, American Art.

 

The ideal candidate will demonstrate scholarly excellence and promise in addition to a strong interest in a museum career. A PhD in art history within the last five years is preferred; however, the fellowship is open to individuals with other academic specialties, such as African American and Women’s Studies. Applications are requested from scholars whose interests and areas of expertise align with one of the museum’s collection strengths and current curatorial initiatives:

 

  • Sculpture: SAAM holds the largest collection of American sculpture in the world with deep strengths in 19th- and 20th-century bronze and marble sculpture and key holdings in works by Hiram Powers, Edmonia Lewis, Paul Manship, and Luis Jiménez. The fellow will work closely with the curator of sculpture to develop a major collections-based project and book tentatively titled, “Skin Deep: Race and American Sculpture.” This research project aims to use sculpture, with its intrinsic and enduring ties to the body, as a tool for charting shifting attitudes on race in American public life.
  • 20th-Century Art: The museum’s rapidly expanding holdings include in-depth collections of painting, photography, graphic art, Latinx art, African American art, sculpture, and time-based media. The fellow will work closely with SAAM’s curator of 20th-century art on research and planning for the reinstallation of the museum’s 20th-century collections. This project aims to articulate collection strengths as well as amplify the presentation of art and artists currently under-recognized within the museum’s holdings, including conceptual, performance, and feminist artists, as well as women and artists of color. The curatorial fellow will be a full member of the curatorial team planning the larger reinstallation and reinterpretation of the museum’s permanent collections.

Application deadline July 15, 2019. Read more about the fellowship and how to apply here: https://americanart.si.edu/about/careers/luce-curatorial-fellowship