The Grapevine

POSITION: Associate Professor or Professor, Modern and/or Contemporary Art History, Tyler School of Art–Applications due Jan. 30, 2021

The Department of Art History of Tyler School of Art and Architecture invites applications for a full-time tenure-track faculty position at the rank of Associate Professor or Professor in the specialization of the arts and visual culture of the Modern and/or Contemporary period. While expertise in modern and/or contemporary art is essential, the committee welcomes applicants from diverse disciplinary backgrounds and encourages research areas centered in geographies beyond Europe and the Americas. Preferred applicants will also demonstrate strengths in one or more of the following fields: critical race theory, settler colonial/postcolonial/decolonial studies, gender and queer theory, and visual/material culture theory. Successful candidates will be expected to have and maintain a strong research agenda and demonstrate a commitment to undergraduate and graduate teaching and mentoring, while contributing to the growth of Tyler’s Art History and Visual Studies programs. They should also be comfortable contributing to and mentoring a culture of diversity in the department and school and working with studio artists at the undergraduate and graduate level. 

The successful candidate will hold a PhD and have a record of research commensurate with rank on application, and demonstrate an appropriate level of teaching experience and service. Candidates should demonstrate familiarity with best teaching practices and with innovative instructional design and technologies. Candidates should also have experience with department and college-wide service and demonstrate professional accomplishments in the discipline. The position involves teaching at the undergraduate level (including Art History majors, Visual Studies majors, studio majors, and non-majors), and teaching and advising at the M.A. and Ph.D. levels (including MFAs, Masters of Arts Management, Masters of Art Education). Tyler’s Department of Art History has a faculty of 13 full-time members who specialize in areas ranging from the ancient world to the present. Art History at Temple is part of the highly-ranked Tyler School of Art and Architecture and there is dynamic synergy among the programs in the school. The department is located on Temple University’s main Philadelphia campus and is housed in a state-of-the-art facility. Temple offers the resources of a major university in a culturally rich city and region.

The letter of application should include a statement describing research and teaching interests and past accomplishments in fostering a culture of diversity in their field and in the classroom. Candidates are encouraged to address the ways in which they could contribute to Temple’s institutional mission and commitment to excellence and diversity and to Tyler’s engagement in interdisciplinarity. In addition, the application should include a CV, name and contact information for three references, two sample syllabi for courses, and a writing sample. Finalists will be expected to supply official degree transcripts, letters of reference, and evaluations for courses taught. 

The successful applicant will begin teaching classes in the fall of 2021; the course load is 2-2. The successful applicant will teach a critical theory class for MFA students, upper-level undergraduate classes which include Art History majors, studio majors, and non-majors, and a graduate seminar; they will also teach and advise MA, MFA, Med, and PhD students.

Please send all materials electronically by January 30, 2021. To apply, please visit temple.slideroom.com to set up an account and upload your application materials. If you need assistance during the upload, email support@slideroom.com.

Temple University is an equal opportunity, equal access, affirmative action employer committed to increasing diversity and inclusivity in both its community and its curricula. Women, people of color, and other candidates who can contribute to this goal are strongly encouraged to apply.

Address further inquiries to Dr. Leah Modigliani, search committee chair, at AHjob17@temple.edu

LEC: Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900

Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900
Zoom Roundtables, Friday February 26 and March 5, 2021 from 5-7 PM UK time.
Organized by the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies at Durham University

What were the opportunities and limitations in late nineteenth-century Paris for artists (broadly defined) who were not white and male?

This pair of events brings together research presentations and roundtable discussion in response to passages from art historian Emily C. Burns’s book-in-progress, Performing Innocence: Cultural Belatedness and U.S. Art in Fin-de-Siècle Paris. Burns analyzes how the encounters in the French capital reshaped American culture, fueled by the idea that the US had no culture, no history, and no tradition. The sections were pre-circulated to participants and will be briefly summarized at the start of the Feb 26 event.

Friday, Feb 26

Emily C. Burns, Associate Professor of Art History, Auburn University / Terra Foundation Visiting Professor, University of Oxford
“Introduction: Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900”

Adrienne L. Childs, Associate, The Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University
“Cordier’s Caryatids: Laboring Black Bodies and the Sumptuous Second Empire Interior”

Susan Waller, Professor Emerita, Department of Art & Design, University of Missouri, St. Louis / Adjunct Professor of Art History, Maine College of Art
“Muslim Models in Nineteenth-century Paris”

Kirsten Pai Buick, Professor of Art History, University of New Mexico
“Don’t Look Back: African and African Diasporic Entanglements with France”

Friday, Mar 5

Peter Gibian, Associate Professor of English, McGill University
“Elle s’affiche”: Women Performers Pushing the Limits—Daisy Miller, Virginie Gautreau [Mme. X], Isadora Duncan”

Juliet Bellow, Associate Professor of Art History, American University
“Rodin and Hanako: Behind the Mask”

Renée Ater, Provost Visiting Professor, Africana Studies, Brown University
“Meta Vaux Warrick in Paris, 1899-1902”

JOB: Asst Prof, Archaeology/Native Peoples @ Boston University

The Department of Anthropology and Program in Archaeology at Boston University invites applications for the position of Assistant Professor (tenure-track) with a focus on the archaeological study of Native peoples of the Americas, beginning Fall 2021. We seek specialists in the material culture of precolumbian or early colonial Native peoples of North, Central, or South America. Indigenous approaches to archaeology are especially welcome. Preferred technical specialties include geospatial and digital methods of archaeological analysis, or bioarchaeology. We will give greater consideration to archaeologists whose scholarship and teaching complement current faculty and bridge cognate campus programs, including American and New England Studies and/or Latin American Studies. Successful applicants will have evidence of an ongoing research program (field, lab, and/or museum/archival), evidence of teaching effectiveness, and evidence of a commitment to increasing diversity and fostering inclusion in academia.

Boston University strives to create environments for learning, working, and living that are enriched by racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity. For full consideration in this position we expect an active record of publication, teaching experience, a willingness to participate actively in student advising, and a commitment to the department’s and university’s institutional values regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion. Application materials should be submitted through Academic Jobs Online academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/17095 by December 20, 2020, and should include a cover letter, current CV, teaching portfolio, and contact information for three references. In the cover letter and teaching portfolio we invite candidates to explain how their teaching and mentorship activities work to increase student awareness of the Indigenous cultures of the Americas and contribute to more robust and inclusive intellectual discourse.

We are an equal opportunity employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. We are a VEVRAA Federal Contractor.

academicjobsonline.org/ajo/jobs/17095

JOB: Asst. Prof. African American Art @ Emory

Assistant Professor of African American Art and Art History
Department of African American Studies

The Department of African American Studies at Emory University, Atlanta, GA, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of African American Studies specializing in Art and Art History.

We are searching for an innovative junior scholar with exceptional promise. The successful candidate will concentrate on African American art and art history and/or visual culture with varied emphases on art practices, theories, historiographies, digital humanities, and/or social movements. Scholars whose work engages African diasporic, intersectional Black Feminist, and Black Queer and Black Trans Studies are especially encouraged to apply, as are those scholars whose research also engages antiblackness, the Movement for Black Lives, structural racism, state surveillance and violence, and the carceral state.

The new hire will teach two courses per semester, including departmental surveys, specialized upper-level undergraduate seminars, and eventually graduate courses as the department expands to offer a Ph.D. in 2022. The new hire will also have the ability to cross-list courses with the Art History Department and also participate in advising graduate and undergraduate students.

The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to work in a diverse city hosting a rich array of cultural institutions. Atlanta is home to the APEX Museum, the High Museum of Art, the Hammonds House Museum, and the Trevor Arnett Art Gallery at Clark-Atlanta University, and Emory University features the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the African American Collection at the Rose Library, and the Arts and Social Justice Fellows Program.

Applicants should submit a cover letter (including discussion of the candidate’s research and teaching interests); CV; a statement about the applicant’s experience mentoring students from diverse backgrounds; and three letters of reference. Application deadline: December 15, 2020. Ph.D. is required by the time of appointment. For any questions about the position or the application process, please contact the search committee chair kali.gross@emory.edu.

All materials to be submitted via apply.interfolio.com/79715.

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

JOB: Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship

Applications are invited for the Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship for the 2021/22 academic year at Oxford University. This post, which is generously funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art, will be based in the History of Art Department (which is part of Oxford’s History Faculty) and is offered in association with a Visiting Fellowship at Worcester College.

This post provides an exciting opportunity to build on long-term research networks, encourage international collaboration, and inspire a new generation of American art academics and curators by further embedding the subject into Oxford’s research communities and its graduate and undergraduate curricula. The successful candidate will engage in advanced study and original research in the history of American art, give a series of four public lectures, and organise a study day. They will also teach one undergraduate and one graduate course, supervise a small number of Master’s theses, and contribute to the Department’s general teaching and administration.  

The successful candidate will hold a doctorate and teaching experience in a relevant field, have a strong research record and/or research potential with a reputation as an international authority within the specialism and a publication record at a standard that will contribute to and enhance the national and international profile of the History of Art Department and History Faculty.

Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates who are under-represented in academic posts in Oxford.

The post is fixed term for 12 months (or until 31 August 2022 whichever is sooner). The deadline for applications is 12 noon (UK time) on Friday 11th December 2020. Interviews are expected to take place via Microsoft Teams at the beginning of January 2021.

https://my.corehr.com/pls/uoxrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.display_form?p_company=10&p_internal_external=E&p_display_in_irish=N&p_process_type=&p_applicant_no=&p_form_profile_detail=&p_display_apply_ind=Y&p_refresh_search=Y&p_recruitment_id=148382

JOB: Assistant Professor of African American Art and Art History

The Department of African American Studies at Emory University, Atlanta, GA, invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of African American Studies specializing in Art and Art History.

We are searching for an innovative junior scholar with exceptional promise. The successful candidate will concentrate on African American art and art history and/or visual culture with varied emphases on art practices, theories, historiographies, digital humanities, and/or social movements. Scholars whose work engages African diasporic, intersectional Black Feminist, and Black Queer and Black Trans Studies are especially encouraged to apply, as are those scholars whose research also engages antiblackness, the Movement for Black Lives, structural racism, state surveillance and violence, and the carceral state.

The new hire will teach two courses per semester, including departmental surveys, specialized upper-level undergraduate seminars, and eventually graduate courses as the department expands to offer a Ph.D. in 2022. The new hire will also have the ability to cross-list courses with the Art History Department and also participate in advising graduate and undergraduate students.

The successful candidate will also have the opportunity to work in a diverse city hosting a rich array of cultural institutions. Atlanta is home to the APEX Museum, the High Museum of Art, the Hammonds House Museum, and the Trevor Arnett Art Gallery at Clark-Atlanta University, and Emory University features the Michael C. Carlos Museum, the African American Collection at the Rose Library, and the Arts and Social Justice Fellows Program.

Applicants should submit a cover letter (including discussion of the candidate’s research and teaching interests); CV; a statement about the applicant’s experience mentoring students from diverse backgrounds; and three letters of reference. Application deadline: December 15, 2020. Ph.D. is required by the time of appointment.

For any questions about the position or the application process, please contact the search committee chair kali.gross@emory.edu. All materials to be submitted via https://apply.interfolio.com/79715.

Emory University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer. Women, minorities, people with disabilities and veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.

CFP: Discovery @ Nineteenth Century Studies Association Conference

DISCOVERY

The 42nd Annual Virtual Conference
Nineteenth Century Studies Association
March 11-13, 2021
Proposal Deadline: October 31, 2020

Website: ncsaweb.net/current-conference-2021-cfp/

NCSA welcomes proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, and special sessions that explore our theme of “Discovery” in the long nineteenth century (1789-1914). Scholars are invited to interrogate the trope of “discovery” by questioning the term’s ideological and colonial implications. Why was the concept of “discovery” so appealing in the nineteenth century, and what does its popularity tell us about the people and social structures that were so invested in it? Papers might also consider indigenous perspectives that challenge ideas of western “discovery” and settler colonialism, new voices that theorize and critique nineteenth-century “discoveries,” intellectual exchange between cultures, and other methods of unmasking narratives of exploration and “discovery.”

As an interdisciplinary organization, we particularly seek papers by scholars working in art/architecture/visual studies, cultural studies, economics, gender and sexuality, history (including history of the book), language and literature, law and politics, musicology, philosophy, and science (and the history of science). In light of the many changes in pedagogy, research, and the exchange of ideas we have all experienced this past year, we particularly welcome papers, panels, or roundtable topics that address discoveries in the use of technology for nineteenth-century studies and teaching.

Papers might discuss recovering forgotten manuscripts, or discovering new ways of thinking about aesthetic and historical periods. Scholars might explore not only the physical recovery of the past (archeology, geology), but also intellectual recovery as old ideas become new (evolution, neoclassicism, socialism, spiritualism). Papers might discuss publicizing discoveries (periodicals, lectures), exhibiting discoveries (museums, world’s fairs, exhibitions), or redressing the legacy of nineteenth-century practices (decolonization of museum collections and the repatriation of colonial-era artifacts). Other topics might include rediscovering and revisiting the period itself: teaching the nineteenth century, editing primary texts, and working toward diversity and social justice in the humanities. For more details, visit: ncsaweb.net/current-conference-2021-cfp/

CFP: Afro Gothic

Afro-Gothic: Black Horror and the Relentless Haunting of Traumatic Pasts
Call for Papers
For Afro-Gothic: Black Horror and the Relentless Haunting of Traumatic Pasts, we seek work that explores the Afro-Gothic as an aesthetic and as a means of working through the trauma of colonial slavery. Although the Gothic genre is widely discussed as a purely European literary tradition, the gothic manifests as a global phenomenon. Every culture possesses its own ghost stories, monster tales, or myths about creatures with supernatural powers. This project examines how the tropes of the gothic—with its constructions of the monstrous, the villainous, the mad and the haunted—take on wholly different valences when they are studied within the contexts of blackness, particularly under the modern colonial project. In our view, one important characteristic of the Afro-Gothic that distinguishes it from its European counterpart is its rootedness in lived black experiences. The Afro-Gothic often addresses the everydayness of black horror in ways that attest to the repetitive violence against black bodies and the relentless haunting of traumatic pasts.

We seek work that explores Afro-Gothic sensibilities in film, fiction, performance, and the visual arts. What we might call Afro-Gothic narratives have emerged lately in popular works by Jordan Peele (Get Out and Candyman), in the series Tales from the Hood (1995/2018) and Lovecraft Country (2020), Childish Gambino’s This is America, and Kara Walker’s antebellum silhouettes, to name just a few. We are interested in works that expand and explode current generic definitions of the Gothic and highlight the ways in which contemporary black artists are reckoning with aesthetics. In what ways does the Afro-Gothic serve to frame our understanding of the contemporary moment through a dark prism of organized terror?

Possible topics to explore might include (but are certainly not limited to):
• colonial hauntings – living among ghosts and the walking dead
• the plight of the hunted and state-sanctioned violence
• dark tourism and haunted houses
• maritime Afro-Gothic – nautical narratives
• medical experimentation and the trope of the mad scientist
• miscegenation, hybridity, and the bodily mash-up
• conjuring, the witch doctor and practitioners of the dark arts
• urban decay and environmentalism – climate crisis, toxicities, eco-gothic and natural disasters
• Afro-Gothic and new technologies, soundscapes, surveillance, cyber-haunting, ghost in
the machine
• menageries of the grotesque and public display of monstrosity

• cannibalization and ‘Eating the Other’
• sexual exploitation and gendered violence
• bondage, dungeons, incarcerations, and the restricted body

Essays must be written in English, but we encourage international submissions on all African Diasporic Afro-Gothic topics. Accepted works will be included in our proposal for a special issue of an online, open-access, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to black studies and aesthetics.

Please submit an abstract (300 words) along with a brief bio to afrogothiccfp@gmail.com.

The deadline for submissions is November 30, 2020.

Tashima Thomas, Editor Pratt Institute
Sybil Newton Cooksey, Editor New York University

LEC: The Recovery Plan Conversation Series

STUDIO ARTS COLLEGE INTERNATIONAL
The Recovery Plan Conversation Series

Studio Arts College International (SACI) is delighted to announce The Recovery Plan Conversation Series: African Diasporic reflections rooted in Italy. Offered by Black History Month Florence (BHMF) and developed and moderated by SACI project leader and BHMF co-founder, Justin Randolph Thompson in collaboration with Museo MAGA Gallarate near Milan and with SACI, this 6 part series of critical conversations explores Afro-descendent perspectives on Italy through the partnering of 5 under-35 Afro-descendent artists living in Italy alongside 5 Afro-descendent Italian based scholars. Each paring of artist and scholar is established, in each instance, through a dynamic positioning of individual art work alongside research and archival findings in Italy on the basis of a common theme related to Blackness in the Italian socio-historical context. As one of multiple features of the project titled The Recovery Plan including the first museum solo exhibition for each of the artists that will be presented at MAGA over the course of the fall semester, Justin Randolph Thompson will moderate these 5 conversations between October and December. A sixth and final session will be a live and interactive conversation with Thompson accompanied by Janine Gaelle Dieudji, co-curator of The Recovery Plan, where they will be speaking about curatorial activism in the context of this project. A designated question and answer period addressing questions posed by online partcipants is designed to generate dialogue and reflections that can extend back to the classrooms or discussion groups of participating institutions.

SACI is dedicated to supporting diversity, inclusion and equity initiatives in Italy and is a strong supporter of BHMF as an organization including its Italian based project activities such as Black History Month Florence, Black Archive Alliance, and The Recovery Plan.

These projects are illustrative of the dynamic artistic and research activity taking place today in Italy and in Europe. We hope you will join us in these
critical conversations that highlight the seminal roles that, in tandem, artists and scholars can play in engaging in forms of social activism through the recuperation of silenced histories and untold stories of communities and of people, too often marginalized and excluded from local discourses and or national conversations.

Moderated Conversations and Dates
The Recovery Plan, in its pop-up version, serves as the foundation for an initiative by BHMF to develop a Black Cultural Center in Florence as a site dedicated to this work which will serve the community of Florence and
be pioneering as the first of its kind in Italy.

In each session, Thompson will guide a conversation in English with a paired artist and scholar on a different theme corresponding to their artistic, scholary, and archival work from The Recovery Plan. Exclusively registered participants will join the online conversation live via zoom. The artists and scholars will share virtual visits to the pop-up exhibition space at Museo MA*GA Gallarte which will serve as a backdrop to each respective conversation theme and as a reflection on artistic and academic forms of research, while the moderator will lead the dialogue providing contextual backdrops rooted in various periods of Italian history and contemporary society. All sessions will begin at 11 pm Central European Time and will be 90 minutes in length. The Conversations will take place every two weeks with the exception of the concluding discussion. The schedule, artist/scholar pairings, and themes are as follows:

Tuesday, Sept 29:
Italianness and the Colonial Gaze
Binta Diaw with Angelica Pesarini

Tuesday, Oct 13:
Spirituality in Diaspora
Raziel Perin with Simao Amista

Tuesday, Oct 27:
Coffee’s Materiality and Exploitation
Francis Offman with Jessica Sartiani

Tuesday, Nov 10:
Cameroonian Roots in Italy
Victor Fotso Nyie with Patrick Joel Tatcheda Yonkeu

Tuesday, Nov 24:
Jerry Masslo and Italian Based Anti Racist Activism
Emmanuel Yoro with Jordan Anderson

Tuesday, Dec 1:
Curatorial Activism
Justin Randolph Thompson and Janine Gaelle Dieudji


Registration and Fees

Universities can enroll in the complete series of 6 sessions or in one or more of the individual conversations. We highly recommend the entire offering as The Recovery Plan is a unique and groundbreaking initiative in Italy and as the 5 paired artist/scholar conversations followed by the unifying sixth and final session were purposefully selected and organized to provide participants with a comprehensive understanding of Blackness as considered through art, scholarship and archival work in the Italian socio-historical context and as linked to curatorial activism. We encourage and welcome all student, faculty, and staff of a registering institution to participate under a single university registration but ask that registering institutions extend these lectures to only student, faculty, and staff members of the registering instution’s community. Please contact Racini Aranda, SACI Director of Admissions to register or for additional questions about registration or payment information at RAranda@saci-florence.edu.

Fees:
Full Series: $995
Individual Conversation: $250
100% of proceeds go to funding The Recovery Plan and the artists and scholars associated with the project. As SACI’s goal is to ensure that this initiative is as broadly accessible as possible to all types of institutions, discounts are available on the basis of institutional need. Please contact Racini Aranda for questions related to institutional discounts.

CFP: Race and Representation in French Colonial Empire at AAH conference

CFP: Race and Representation in the French Colonial Empire
Co-convenors: Susannah Blair (Columbia University) and Dr Stephanie O’Rourke (University of St Andrews)
Contact details: seb2210@columbia.edu and so38@st-andrews.ac.uk

Abstract
This panel will consolidate new research on the visual culture of race in France and its colonies during the eighteenth century and into the nineteenth century. It will be oriented around two key terms, ‘representation’ and ‘possession’, and their many resonances­­ – artistic, political, legal, and relational. We invite papers to explore how art objects articulated, contested, and disseminated changing notions of racial identity and citizenship in France and its global networks.

Over the past several years, scholars have examined the role of pictorial representation in shaping ideas of race, identity, indigeneity, and slavery in the context of the eighteenth-century British empire. However, as Anne Lafont observes in her recent book (L’Art et la race, 2019), the French case has received relatively less sustained attention. Bringing together new scholarship that builds upon these precedents, we aim to address a deliberately expansive geographical notion of French visual culture, one that includes the Caribbean, New France, Canada, and the Indian Ocean in addition to sites within the ‘metropole’ such as Paris and Nantes. Fostering a dialogue between art history, indigenous studies, and critical race theory, our panel will provide a crucial scholarly platform for research that can inform pedagogy, curatorial practice, and future scholarship.

How to Submit a Proposal:
We invite proposals for 25-minute papers. At present AAH is planning a hybrid event that will involve a physical conference as well as a digital participation option for those who cannot or would prefer not to attend in person. We encourage submissions from those who intend to participate in a digital-only capacity as well as from those interested in attending in person. To submit a paper proposal, please fill out the proposal form (bit.ly/3eVYWZu)  and send it to seb2210@columbia.edu and so38@st-andrews.ac.uk by 19 October 2020. Please provide a title and abstract (250 words max), and a CV.  For more information, visit forarthistory.org.uk/our-work/conference/2021-annual-conference/