The Grapevine

Panel on “The Chinese and Iron Road” at University of San Francisco, 4/11/2017, 5:00-6:30 pm

BAKER Horace1833 1918 engraver Across the Continent_1878 Frank Leslie Illustrated Newspapers.jpg

Horace Baker (engraver), “Across the Continent—The Frank Leslie Transcontinental Excursion,” published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspapers, Apr. 27, 1878, page 129, at Online Archives of California.

Caption also reads “Rounding Cape Horn at the head of the great American Canyon with a view of the South Fork of the American River, where gold was first discovered in 1848. Chinese laborers.”

 

Panelists Sue Lee (Chinese Historical Society of America), Hilton Obenzinger (Stanford University’s Chinese Railroad Worker’s in North America Project), Paulette Liang (a descendant of a Chinese person who worked on the railroad) and James Zarsadiaz (USF) meet to discuss “Reconstructing History, Reconstructing Lives: Chinese Laborers and the Building of the Transcontinental Railroad” at USF’s Gleeson Library tomorrow.

The event is free and open to the public.

JOB: Curator-in-Residence @ The Driskell Center/UMD Art Gallery

The University of Maryland Art Gallery at College Park is now accepting applications for its first Curator-in-Residence program: http://www.driskellcenter.umd.edu/about/employment_opp.php

Starting in July 2017, the successful candidate will participate in a one-year residency in which they will originate and present two exhibitions and related public programs. The Curator-in-Residence will work closely with the Executive Director of the David C. Driskell Center at the University of Maryland as well as the Assistant Director of The University of Maryland Art Gallery.

The University of Maryland Art Gallery is pleased to launch its first Curator-in-Residence program with the main objective of engaging an experienced curator with The University of Maryland Art Gallery and the community it serves. The successful candidate will curate innovative exhibitions and assist The University of Maryland Art Gallery with developing programs that promote greater accessibility to both the university community and the general public. The Curator-in-Residence will serve as a professional resource for students, local artists, and arts professionals, both at the University of Maryland and in the local communities of Washington, D.C., Maryland, and Virginia, and must have a keen interest in understanding and working with university students and artists.

The Curator-in-Residence’s responsibilities include, but are not limited to:
• Curate two exhibitions of diverse mediums of professionally highprofile contemporary artists
• Provide content (e.g. checklist, introduction) for catalogues, brochures, press releases, and all related publicity material, etc., as well as prepare didactic text for exhibitions
• Write essays when required for individual exhibition publications
• Suggest and assist with selecting speakers for guest lectures, gallery tours, artist residencies, etc.
• Present a curator talk, at least one per exhibition
• Organize a two-hour seminar in curatorial practices and studies for undergraduate and graduate students, one per semester
• Write one or two critiques and reviews about a local art exhibition for publication in local, regional, and/or national platform
• Make recommendations for future gallery programming and assist with identifying a potential Curator-in-Residence for the following year
Minimum required qualifications:
• An MFA or MA in Art History, Museum Studies, or another relevant related field
• Demonstrated knowledge of a particular historical period, preferably modern and contemporary art
• Excellent verbal and written communications skills are essential
• Creative individual with the capacity to take initiative, work well independently as well as with a team, and adjust easily to an ever-changing, demanding, arts organization
• Minimum of five years’ experience as curator in an academic museum, non-profit or similar setting
• Proven records of publications
• Teaching experience is preferred

The Curator-in-Residence is a part-time, outside consultant position; his/her presence at the University is required for nine visits, four days each, over the one-year period. Payment as an outside consultant will be provide monthly, at $2,200 each month (total $26,400 for twelve months), based on completion of the tasks required. The Curator-in-Residence will be involved in all curatorial aspects during the residency and will have full administrative support from the The University of Maryland Art Gallery, the David C. Driskell Center, and the University of Maryland.

To apply:
Please send the following documents to:
driskellcenter@umd.edu with subject: Curator-in-Residence_LASTNAME

• A one-page cover letter outlining curatorial interests, professional experience, and what you hope to accomplish in a twelve-month residency at The University of Maryland Art Gallery

• A résumé

• Five JPEGS of previous exhibitions and public events organized by the applicant

• One academic or critical writing sample

• One didactic writing sample for “general” audience

• Contact information for three professional references.

Marvel executive says emphasis on diversity may have alienated readers

How many things can be blamed on diversity?

Sian Cain’s article in today’s Guardian makes it clear that Marvel VP of Sales David Gabriel’s reasoning isn’t reasoned. Recently, Gabriel told a gathering that some comic store owners say their customers “have had enough” of new female and ethnic minority characters.

What customers?

Is there a limit to diversity?

Gabriel is not alone in the effort to make diversity appear unprofitable and to present good diversity practices as charitable acts. . .and bad business. Such false beliefs are widespread. Yet, they are counter to research that proves otherwise.

As always, the comments from Guardian readers are worth perusing.  There’re more than 1,000 of them to date. These letters provide great fodder for thinking about the power of representation and the shifts in visual culture.

500

EXH: Black Fashion Designers @ FIT until May 16, 2017

On view: December 6, 2016 through May 16, 2017 This sweeping exhibition showcases works of fashion designers of African descent created from the 1950s through now. Organized into themes including “Breaking into the Industry,” “Rise of the Black Designer,” “Eveningwear,” “African Influences,” “Street Influences,” “Activism,” “Menswear,” “Black Models” and “Experimentation,” the fashions are as varied as the designers […]

via Black Fashion Designers at FIT Museum — Fashion, Textile & Costume Librarians

REF: Race and Norman Rockwell

On the 6th of March 1943, iconic painter and illustrator of American culture Norman Rockwell, published Freedom from Want or The Thanksgiving Picture in The Saturday Evening Post, one of over 300 covers he produced for the Indianapolis publication during his lifetime. It was the third of four oil paintings known as the Four Freedoms inspired by […]

via White on White: Hidden Race in Rockwell’s ‘Freedom from Want’ — A R T L▼R K

Race and American Visual Culture seminar @ American Antiquarian Society

2017 Center for Historic American Visual Culture (CHAViC) Summer Seminar

In Black and White: Race and American Visual Culture

American Antiquarian Society

Dates of Seminar: June 9-13, 2017

Applications Due: March 15, 2017

The 2017 CHAViC Summer Seminar at the American Antiquarian Society will explore how American visual culture expressed ideas about race, specifically blackness and whiteness, across the long nineteenth century. Through lectures, readings, hands-on workshops, and group research, participants will learn how popular forms of visual culture have constructed racial identities in the United States and how looking can function as a racialized practice. The seminar leader will be Tanya Sheehan, associate professor and chair of the Art Department at Colby College and editor of the Archives of American Art Journal at the Smithsonian Institution. Guest faculty will include Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor, assistant professor in the History Department at Smith College and Jasmine Nichole Cobb, assistant professor in the Department of African & American Studies at Duke University.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn from the extraordinary collections at AAS, including popular prints, political cartoons, photographs, illustrated books and periodicals, sheet music, and ephemera such as trade cards. Case studies may include: caricatures of African Americans in Edward Clay’s lithographic series Life in Philadelphia (1828-1830), the visual culture of blackface minstrelsy and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), graphics from popular periodicals like Harper’s Weekly that picture racial politics at key moments in U.S. history, efforts to recreate the “image of the black” by African American writer Phillis Wheatley and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, fantasies of racial difference in illustrated children’s books and commercial trade cards, and efforts to visualize raced bodies in early photographic portraiture. There will be a field trip to the Museum of African American History in Boston to view the exhibition Picturing Frederick Douglass.

The seminar will be held from Friday, June 9, through Tuesday, June 13, 2017, at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. Participation is intended for college and university faculty as well as graduate students and museum professionals.

For further information, syllabus, and application materials, please consult the AAS website at www.americanantiquarian.org/2017-chavic-summer-seminar

 

Exhibition in a Box/ Autograph ABP

THE MISSING CHAPTER:  BLACK CHRONICLES/EXHIBITION IN A BOX

The Exhibition In A Box provides a photography pop-up archive exhibition display and versatile learning tool-kit, intended for use across a diverse range of spaces, including community centres, schools, colleges, public libraries and other resources such as local archives.

 

Designed to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography, the Exhibition In A Box comprises thirty remarkable A3 image panels produced from rare 19TH century photographs portraying people of African, Caribbean and South Asian descent during the Victorian era in Britain. It comes complete with a set of promotional postcards, information leaflets featuring presentation instructions and adhesive pads, making it ready for installation and fully reusable.

The Exhibition In A Box is a free limited edition resource available from Autograph ABP on application. If you are interested in acquiring one please contact ali@autograph-abp.co.uk to request a copy.

Part of The Missing Chapter programme, supported by Heritage Lottery Fund. Developed in association with and the generous support of the Hulton Archive, a division of Getty Images.

Contents of box

  • Thirty A3 Image Panels
  • Two A3 Text Panels
  • Thirty promotional Postcards
  • Two hundred adhesive Foam Pads
  • Two copies of an Illustrated Leaflet

 

Aims and Objectives

The Exhibition In A Box is specially designed for users to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography by:

Enabling organisers and participants to independently curate their own pop-up exhibition, using all or selected images from Autograph ABP’s acclaimed The Missing Chapter research portfolio.

Providing teachers, tutors and facilitators with a powerful, cross-curricular learning tool-kit supporting formal and informal discussions in classrooms or other facilitated group sessions.

Allowing unique archival photography to be re-used, preserved and presented

multiple times in different settings for a wide range of learning and display needs.

The Photographic Portraits  in The Missing Chapter: Black Chronicles offer a unique snapshot of black lives and migrant experiences during the decades following the birth of photography in 1839.  They represent a diverse range of people, from visiting performers, politicians, dignitaries, servicemen and women, royalty and missionaries, to known personalities and many as yet unidentified individuals living and working in Britain at the time. Their collective presence bears direct witness to the nation’s colonial and imperial history, and the expansion of the British Empire during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

These portraits highlight an important and complex black presence in Britain before 1948, a watershed moment often cited as the beginning of the emergence of a multicultural modern British society after the SS Empire Windrush brought the first large group of West Indian migrants to Britain. Produced in commercial studios during the latter half of the nineteenth century, many lay buried deep within the archives for decades – unseen for more than 125 years.

Cross curriculum links and themes include, but are not limited to, subject areas including Art & Design, Photography, Media Studies, History, English, Geography, Sociology or Citizenship as well as key themes and study skills including Migration, Identity and Cultural Diversity, (Visual) Literacy, Critical Analysis, Research and Representation.

The collections represented include the Hulton Archive (a division of Getty Images), National Portrait Gallery, Royal Collection Trust as well as the private collections of Val Wilmer, Michael Graham-Stuart, Amoret Tanner/FotoLibra, Paul Frecker/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography, and the photographic archive of Autograph ABP, London.

CFP ASWAD Biennial: panel/proposal submissions: Mar. 3, 2017 deadline

 
Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora
 9th Biennial Conference 
Hosted by Pablo de Olavide University
Seville, Spain
 
African/Diasporic Futures: Re-Envisioning Power, Interventions, Imaginations and Belonging

November 7-11, 2017 Seville, Spain

Deadline for Submission: Friday, March 3, 2017
In 2015 the United Nations launched the Decade for the People of African Descent to acknowledge descendants of the African Diaspora as a distinct group whose human dignities and rights have been violated throughout the globe. The Decade for the People of African Descent is a sustained global commitment to recognize, protect, and bring about inclusive social justice to members of the African Diaspora. Contemporarily, Europe is an epicenter of such urgent grappling with systematic and long-term social inequities. Politics and policies of racialized exclusion, particularly through its engagement with Africans and people of African descent, re-center Europe’s non-neutral racial projects in their nation building.

The protection and promotion of human rights has gained greater significance and urgency with the crisis of African migration, and other forced and semi-forced migrations from Western Asia and Eastern Europe. As these individuals and groups have sought refuge and equitable and humane social participation within European societies, they have challenged conceptualizations of the state and citizenship formation, and continue to force new articulations and notions of “home” and belonging. These current migratory flows are newer iterations of a long relationship between Europe and Africa, and between Europe and the African Diaspora that spans centuries.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 9th biennial conference to be held in Seville, Spain, November 7 to 11, 2017 on the campus of Pablo de Olavide University to discuss, examine, and reflect on the critical nature of the interactions and transformations that African descendants experience in their diaspora, particularly within a European context. As an interdisciplinary organization, ASWAD invites presentations that illuminate the lives of Africans and African descendants from scholars of any discipline, including social sciences, physical sciences, life sciences and performing arts.  We aim to collaborate with activist and intellectual communities around sustained dialogue involving diaspora, race and citizenship, and historical and contemporary patterns of racial formation.

In addition to academics, ASWAD welcomes artists, activists, journalists, and independent scholars with specific interests in the African Diaspora. We are especially keen to create a platform for Black European Groups and NGOs.

We encourage proposals that align with the conference theme. Suggested panel themes include, but are not limited to the following:
a.         The African Diaspora, Modern States and (Re)Conceptions of Citizenship
b.         Humanitarianism and Human Rights in the Global African Diaspora
c.         Black Lives Matter Across the Globe
d.         The African Diaspora, Economics and Immigration to/in Europe

e.         Religion, Power, and Praxis in the African Diaspora

f.          African Diaspora and the Arts and Activism in Europe
g.         Spain and the African Diaspora
h.         Writing and Translating the African Diaspora and Black Identities in Europe
i.          The United Nation’s Decade for People of African Descent
j.          Music and the Performing Arts in Africa and the African Diaspora
k.         Pedagogy, Higher Education and Activism
l.          Black LGBTQIA Social Constructs
m.        Labor and Organizing in Local and International Contexts
n.         Activism and New Technologies and Media
o.         African Diasporic Futures: Challenges and Opportunities
p.        Future Makings: Collective re-imaginations through migration
q.        Reimagining social spaces and collective identities
The city of Seville is a UNESCO world heritage site and former medieval capital of Euro-African kingdoms, both Muslim and Christian, and later head of Spain’s early modern world empire. The city is a nexus of African Diaspora history, with a living heritage of connecting Europe, America and Africa. Pablo de Olavide University, ASWAD‘s 2017 conference host, has a demonstrated commitment to international cooperation and social justice.

Teaching Tool: Exploration of Appalachian Identity through Photography

I teach art history and art appreciation in the Department of Art and Design at Morehead State University in eastern Kentucky. Most of my students are first-generation college students, and many of them come from the economically-depressed counties within a short driving distance of my institution. Through in-class discussion and office hour chats, I have […]

via Appalachian Identities and Photography as Social Commentary — Art History Teaching Resources

EXH: Muslims in New York @ Museum of the City of New York

Muslims have been woven into the fabric of New York since the city’s origins as New Amsterdam, and the Museum is happy to share highlights from our collection which shed light on this deep history in our current exhibition, Muslim in New York. The size and diversity of New York’s Muslim community has continued to […]

via Muslim in New York: Highlights from the Photography Collection — MCNY Blog: New York Stories