The Grapevine

REF: Race and Norman Rockwell

On the 6th of March 1943, iconic painter and illustrator of American culture Norman Rockwell, published Freedom from Want or The Thanksgiving Picture in The Saturday Evening Post, one of over 300 covers he produced for the Indianapolis publication during his lifetime. It was the third of four oil paintings known as the Four Freedoms inspired by […]

via White on White: Hidden Race in Rockwell’s ‘Freedom from Want’ — A R T L▼R K

Race and American Visual Culture seminar @ American Antiquarian Society

2017 Center for Historic American Visual Culture (CHAViC) Summer Seminar

In Black and White: Race and American Visual Culture

American Antiquarian Society

Dates of Seminar: June 9-13, 2017

Applications Due: March 15, 2017

The 2017 CHAViC Summer Seminar at the American Antiquarian Society will explore how American visual culture expressed ideas about race, specifically blackness and whiteness, across the long nineteenth century. Through lectures, readings, hands-on workshops, and group research, participants will learn how popular forms of visual culture have constructed racial identities in the United States and how looking can function as a racialized practice. The seminar leader will be Tanya Sheehan, associate professor and chair of the Art Department at Colby College and editor of the Archives of American Art Journal at the Smithsonian Institution. Guest faculty will include Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor, assistant professor in the History Department at Smith College and Jasmine Nichole Cobb, assistant professor in the Department of African & American Studies at Duke University.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn from the extraordinary collections at AAS, including popular prints, political cartoons, photographs, illustrated books and periodicals, sheet music, and ephemera such as trade cards. Case studies may include: caricatures of African Americans in Edward Clay’s lithographic series Life in Philadelphia (1828-1830), the visual culture of blackface minstrelsy and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), graphics from popular periodicals like Harper’s Weekly that picture racial politics at key moments in U.S. history, efforts to recreate the “image of the black” by African American writer Phillis Wheatley and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, fantasies of racial difference in illustrated children’s books and commercial trade cards, and efforts to visualize raced bodies in early photographic portraiture. There will be a field trip to the Museum of African American History in Boston to view the exhibition Picturing Frederick Douglass.

The seminar will be held from Friday, June 9, through Tuesday, June 13, 2017, at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. Participation is intended for college and university faculty as well as graduate students and museum professionals.

For further information, syllabus, and application materials, please consult the AAS website at www.americanantiquarian.org/2017-chavic-summer-seminar

 

Exhibition in a Box/ Autograph ABP

THE MISSING CHAPTER:  BLACK CHRONICLES/EXHIBITION IN A BOX

The Exhibition In A Box provides a photography pop-up archive exhibition display and versatile learning tool-kit, intended for use across a diverse range of spaces, including community centres, schools, colleges, public libraries and other resources such as local archives.

 

Designed to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography, the Exhibition In A Box comprises thirty remarkable A3 image panels produced from rare 19TH century photographs portraying people of African, Caribbean and South Asian descent during the Victorian era in Britain. It comes complete with a set of promotional postcards, information leaflets featuring presentation instructions and adhesive pads, making it ready for installation and fully reusable.

The Exhibition In A Box is a free limited edition resource available from Autograph ABP on application. If you are interested in acquiring one please contact ali@autograph-abp.co.uk to request a copy.

Part of The Missing Chapter programme, supported by Heritage Lottery Fund. Developed in association with and the generous support of the Hulton Archive, a division of Getty Images.

Contents of box

  • Thirty A3 Image Panels
  • Two A3 Text Panels
  • Thirty promotional Postcards
  • Two hundred adhesive Foam Pads
  • Two copies of an Illustrated Leaflet

 

Aims and Objectives

The Exhibition In A Box is specially designed for users to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography by:

Enabling organisers and participants to independently curate their own pop-up exhibition, using all or selected images from Autograph ABP’s acclaimed The Missing Chapter research portfolio.

Providing teachers, tutors and facilitators with a powerful, cross-curricular learning tool-kit supporting formal and informal discussions in classrooms or other facilitated group sessions.

Allowing unique archival photography to be re-used, preserved and presented

multiple times in different settings for a wide range of learning and display needs.

The Photographic Portraits  in The Missing Chapter: Black Chronicles offer a unique snapshot of black lives and migrant experiences during the decades following the birth of photography in 1839.  They represent a diverse range of people, from visiting performers, politicians, dignitaries, servicemen and women, royalty and missionaries, to known personalities and many as yet unidentified individuals living and working in Britain at the time. Their collective presence bears direct witness to the nation’s colonial and imperial history, and the expansion of the British Empire during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

These portraits highlight an important and complex black presence in Britain before 1948, a watershed moment often cited as the beginning of the emergence of a multicultural modern British society after the SS Empire Windrush brought the first large group of West Indian migrants to Britain. Produced in commercial studios during the latter half of the nineteenth century, many lay buried deep within the archives for decades – unseen for more than 125 years.

Cross curriculum links and themes include, but are not limited to, subject areas including Art & Design, Photography, Media Studies, History, English, Geography, Sociology or Citizenship as well as key themes and study skills including Migration, Identity and Cultural Diversity, (Visual) Literacy, Critical Analysis, Research and Representation.

The collections represented include the Hulton Archive (a division of Getty Images), National Portrait Gallery, Royal Collection Trust as well as the private collections of Val Wilmer, Michael Graham-Stuart, Amoret Tanner/FotoLibra, Paul Frecker/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography, and the photographic archive of Autograph ABP, London.

CFP ASWAD Biennial: panel/proposal submissions: Mar. 3, 2017 deadline

 
Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora
 9th Biennial Conference 
Hosted by Pablo de Olavide University
Seville, Spain
 
African/Diasporic Futures: Re-Envisioning Power, Interventions, Imaginations and Belonging

November 7-11, 2017 Seville, Spain

Deadline for Submission: Friday, March 3, 2017
In 2015 the United Nations launched the Decade for the People of African Descent to acknowledge descendants of the African Diaspora as a distinct group whose human dignities and rights have been violated throughout the globe. The Decade for the People of African Descent is a sustained global commitment to recognize, protect, and bring about inclusive social justice to members of the African Diaspora. Contemporarily, Europe is an epicenter of such urgent grappling with systematic and long-term social inequities. Politics and policies of racialized exclusion, particularly through its engagement with Africans and people of African descent, re-center Europe’s non-neutral racial projects in their nation building.

The protection and promotion of human rights has gained greater significance and urgency with the crisis of African migration, and other forced and semi-forced migrations from Western Asia and Eastern Europe. As these individuals and groups have sought refuge and equitable and humane social participation within European societies, they have challenged conceptualizations of the state and citizenship formation, and continue to force new articulations and notions of “home” and belonging. These current migratory flows are newer iterations of a long relationship between Europe and Africa, and between Europe and the African Diaspora that spans centuries.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 9th biennial conference to be held in Seville, Spain, November 7 to 11, 2017 on the campus of Pablo de Olavide University to discuss, examine, and reflect on the critical nature of the interactions and transformations that African descendants experience in their diaspora, particularly within a European context. As an interdisciplinary organization, ASWAD invites presentations that illuminate the lives of Africans and African descendants from scholars of any discipline, including social sciences, physical sciences, life sciences and performing arts.  We aim to collaborate with activist and intellectual communities around sustained dialogue involving diaspora, race and citizenship, and historical and contemporary patterns of racial formation.

In addition to academics, ASWAD welcomes artists, activists, journalists, and independent scholars with specific interests in the African Diaspora. We are especially keen to create a platform for Black European Groups and NGOs.

We encourage proposals that align with the conference theme. Suggested panel themes include, but are not limited to the following:
a.         The African Diaspora, Modern States and (Re)Conceptions of Citizenship
b.         Humanitarianism and Human Rights in the Global African Diaspora
c.         Black Lives Matter Across the Globe
d.         The African Diaspora, Economics and Immigration to/in Europe

e.         Religion, Power, and Praxis in the African Diaspora

f.          African Diaspora and the Arts and Activism in Europe
g.         Spain and the African Diaspora
h.         Writing and Translating the African Diaspora and Black Identities in Europe
i.          The United Nation’s Decade for People of African Descent
j.          Music and the Performing Arts in Africa and the African Diaspora
k.         Pedagogy, Higher Education and Activism
l.          Black LGBTQIA Social Constructs
m.        Labor and Organizing in Local and International Contexts
n.         Activism and New Technologies and Media
o.         African Diasporic Futures: Challenges and Opportunities
p.        Future Makings: Collective re-imaginations through migration
q.        Reimagining social spaces and collective identities
The city of Seville is a UNESCO world heritage site and former medieval capital of Euro-African kingdoms, both Muslim and Christian, and later head of Spain’s early modern world empire. The city is a nexus of African Diaspora history, with a living heritage of connecting Europe, America and Africa. Pablo de Olavide University, ASWAD‘s 2017 conference host, has a demonstrated commitment to international cooperation and social justice.

Teaching Tool: Exploration of Appalachian Identity through Photography

I teach art history and art appreciation in the Department of Art and Design at Morehead State University in eastern Kentucky. Most of my students are first-generation college students, and many of them come from the economically-depressed counties within a short driving distance of my institution. Through in-class discussion and office hour chats, I have […]

via Appalachian Identities and Photography as Social Commentary — Art History Teaching Resources

EXH: Muslims in New York @ Museum of the City of New York

Muslims have been woven into the fabric of New York since the city’s origins as New Amsterdam, and the Museum is happy to share highlights from our collection which shed light on this deep history in our current exhibition, Muslim in New York. The size and diversity of New York’s Muslim community has continued to […]

via Muslim in New York: Highlights from the Photography Collection — MCNY Blog: New York Stories

CFP: Special Latino Art issue of the Archives of American Art Journal

Call for essay proposals closes March 1

The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art is planning an issue of the Archives of American Art Journal devoted to Latino art. This special issue will offer a valuable opportunity for scholars and artists to increase the visibility of Latino studies in the field of American art history as well as enrich the study of Latino art with primary sources at the Archives of American Art. While the Archives has been collecting the papers of Latino artists for decades, the focused collecting initiative that it launched in 2015 has resulted in the acquisition of many important new collections, which include the personal papers of artists, gallery and organization records, and oral history interviews. You can explore the Archives’ Latino art research collections online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

Essays selected for publication in the journal will offer new approaches to Latino art and artists by thinking in innovative ways about primary sources in the Archives of American Art. Authors must identify the specific collections that will inform their research. Please include the following in a single MS Word document and email it to Tanya Sheehan, editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, SheehanT@si.edu, by March 1, 2017:

* Author name and contact information

* Proposed manuscript title and abstract of no more than 250 words

The journal’s editorial team will review the proposals and then invite select authors to prepare a manuscript of 5,000-7,000 words (including endnotes) for double-blind peer review. Complete manuscripts for review will be due by July 1, 2017. Essays must be previously unpublished and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Archives of American Art Journal is the longest-running scholarly journal devoted to the history of American art. It aims to showcase new approaches to and out-of-the-box thinking about primary sources. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press, the journal contains both peer-reviewed research and commissioned articles based in part on the vast holdings of the Archives.

Information on manuscript submissions and review criteria is available on the journal’s webpage, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/aaa.

EXH: “Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze” @ David Driskell Center, opens March 2nd

The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park is proud to announce its spring exhibition, Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze. The exhibition, organized by the Driskell Center, is curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton, assisted by Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron. The exhibition will be on display at the Driskell Center from Thursday, March 2, 2017 through Friday, May 26, 2017, with an opening reception on Thursday, March 2nd, from 5-7PM.

CFP: “America Is (Still) Hard to See: New Directions in American Art History,” Association of Historians of American Art (AHAA) session at College Art Association conference, Feb. 21-24, 2018 (Los Angeles, CA)

The 2015 inaugural exhibition of the new Whitney Museum of American Art, America Is Hard to See, charted a largely unconventional history of modern American art built around issues that have galvanized United States artists, pressing them into often uncomfortable relationships with challenging political and social contexts, including the history of slavery, labor unrest and the Vietnam War–and effectively underscoring the point that American is hard to see.

In recent years, scores of museum exhibitions, books and catalogues have worked to reimagine the field among these lines, telling the history of United States art in all of its multilayered, messy complexity. It is not common to find major shows of previously suppressed African-American and Latinx artists as well as scholarly studies of forgotten women and LGBTQ artists. Yet in an era of unprecedented economic inequality, Black Lives Matter, the rise of the alternative right, and anti-immigration reform, there remains much to be done.

This panel seeks to address where American art history from colonial times to the present sits in our twenty-first century classrooms, galleries, museums, blogs and journals–and, more importantly, what directions we might pursue for its future growth. We welcome papers representing all historical periods in American art as well as new avenues of research and methodological inquiry.

Please send a one-page abstract and short c.v. by March 15, 2017, to sessions@ahaaonline.org

AHAA seeks to included new voices, and we encourage younger scholars to make submissions. Chairs and panelists of AHAA-sponsored sessions must be current members of AHAA and CAA.

PhD Opportunity at the Institute for Black Atlantic Research (UK) — Applications Due Feb. 28, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 2.55.10 PM.pngUndated photo of Stuart Hall, at IBAR

Applications are invited for a full time PhD (via MPhil) studentship in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences in the Institute for Black Atlantic Research. The studentship is tenable for up to 3 years full-time [subject to satisfactory progress] and will cover the cost of tuition fees at UK/EU rates and a maintenance grant of £7750. International applicants may apply but will be required to pay the difference in tuition fees. The studentship is funded through the Stuart Hall Foundation.

Supervisory team to include Professor Lubaina Himid & Professor Alan Rice.

Project Description

This project will investigate the consequences for artistic process of the Black presence in Northern Britain. It will first research the histories of slavery and migration and historic, cultural and theoretical responses to them in the context of Black Atlantic Cultural Studies before undertaking a creative practice project to make new work looking at either the historical or contemporary manifestations of Black culture in the North. It takes as its starting point the idea that there is an inherent metropolitan and London-centric bias in the discussion of Black culture in Britain and will itself undertake original research and creative practice that works to highlight hitherto neglected and forgotten cultural histories and practices. The project will consist of the creative practice itself and a theoretically and academically informed written up justification of the practice.

Candidates should have (or expect to hold) a UK Bachelor of Arts degree at 2:1 or above in a related area (or equivalent qualification), or a Masters level qualification.

International applicants require an English Language level of UKVI IELTs 6.5 (no sub-score below 6.0) or equivalent qualification.

Further information

For an informal discussion about the project please contact Professor Alan Rice email: arice@uclan.ac.uk

For the application form and full details please visit http://www.uclan.ac.uk/research/study/studentships.php and download an application pack. This will be available during the week beginning 13th February.

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk

Closing Date: 28 February 2017

Proposed Interview Date: 13 March 2017