The Grapevine

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture”

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture.” Accepted papers will appear in a guest-edited section of Panorama issue 5.1 (May 2019).

Amateurism, as both a praxis and an attitude, has been a fundamental concept for the development and reception of American art. In the Colonial period, for instance, trained painters and self-taught limners alike were measured against Europe’s professional portraitists, and producers of decorative arts were often viewed as craftspeople or artisans rather than fine artists. And during the nineteenth century itinerant painters and so-called “folk artists” established careers that had little in common with those of artists now recognized as American masters, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church. At the same time, however, Americans (Benjamin Franklin, for example) have long admired the “Yankee ingenuity” and “useful knowledge” of self-starters and laypeople.

In the twentieth century amateurism emerged as an invaluable foil for American modernists: Robert Henri encouraged the painting of what one knows rather than what one learns; the regionalist artists disavowed the theoretical expertise of the Stieglitz Circle artists and writers; and the junk stylings of some Neo-Dadaists were complemented by their slapdash techniques and a casual disregard for “high art.” Snapshots, home movies, and hobby art are more obvious, though historically far less visible, examples of artforms that have been classified as amateur, and today, of course, DIY productions, both digital and analog, abound, and everyone with a smartphone is an accidental curator.

The various historical and contemporary categorizations of Native American visual culture are especially relevant to these themes. We know, for instance, that Abstract Expressionists borrowed from supposedly “primitive” artforms to heighten the aura of untutored amateurism around their works. But we also know that appropriation is just one context, and a flawed one at that, for analyzing Native American art, which for better and for worse, often finds itself at the crossroads of the vernacular and the institutional. And, of course, Native American artists have negotiated amateur and professional identities for their own purposes, in order to advance sovereignty, for example, or to participate in markets not entirely their own.

Refreshingly, scholars, curators, and publishers have begun to examine the art and visual culture of amateurism in recent years: there is the enduring appeal of the photographic snapshot and accompanying “snapshot aesthetic,” recent books and articles on amateur film, successful folk art exhibitions, and the National Gallery of Art’s current exhibition Outliers and American Vanguard Art. Nevertheless, the significance of the amateur-professional dialectic to American art requires more critical attention, and, at a time when the arts and humanities are subjected to more and more evaluative measures, the insouciance of amateur art seems more and more urgent.

Panorama seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words that take innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of amateur art and its material, historical, theoretical terrain. We encourage authors to consider the unique advantages of the journal’s online platform, which permits various digital enhancements, such as high-resolution images with zoom capabilities, the embedding of moving images and films, interactive maps, and the reconstruction of historical exhibitions, to name a few possibilities.

To propose a paper, please send a 500-word abstract and curriculum vitae to Justin Wolff: justin.wolff@maine.edu.

Deadline for proposals: May 15, 2018

Deadline for papers: December 31, 2018

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JOBS: Curatorial Positions @ Crystal Bridges Museum

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is currently accepting applications for four curatorial positions – three that focus on contemporary American art and one that focuses on American art pre-1960.

Assistant Curator, The Momentary

• Position Summary: The Momentary is a new Center for Contemporary Visual and Performing Arts and Culinary Discovery in Bentonville, AR, slated to open in spring 2020. The Center will operate as a subsidiary of Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. The Assistant Curator, The Momentary will serve as a key member of the curatorial team and support the Curator, Contemporary Art and The Momentary’s Director in the development and implementation of curatorial projects, including exhibition planning and installation, artist projects, and publication.

Curator of Performing Arts

• Position Summary: The Curator of Performing Arts will serve as a senior member of The Momentary’s curatorial team and support the Momentary’s Director in the development and implementation of performing arts projects, including concerts and performances, residencies, commissions, workshops, audio and video recordings, and publications. The Curator of Performing Arts will work alongside the Curator, Contemporary Art and will lead a small team of Programmers.

Curatorial Assistant

• Position Summary: The Curatorial Assistant works under the immediate supervision of the Curator of American Art and is responsible for providing curatorial and administrative support to the Curator and Assistant Curator. The Curatorial Assistant is an integral member of the curatorial team and will contribute to the curatorial vision. A strong interest in and experience with American art before 1960 is required.

Curatorial Assistant, State of the Art II

• Position Summary: The Curatorial Assistant, State of the Art II (SOTA II) works under the immediate supervision of the Curator, Contemporary Art and is responsible for providing curatorial and administrative support to the SOTA II curatorial team. A strong interest in and experience with contemporary art is required. This is a full-time, temporary, two-year position.

For more detailed job descriptions, and to apply, please visit:

Assistant Curator: https://www.paycomonline.net/v4/ats/web.php/jobs/ViewJobDetails?job=4087&clientkey=BC9586F35E70BD74D59EC08D93D8EDD5

Curator of Performing Arts: https://www.paycomonline.net/v4/ats/web.php/jobs/ViewJobDetails?job=4089&clientkey=BC9586F35E70BD74D59EC08D93D8EDD5

Curatorial Assistant: https://www.paycomonline.net/v4/ats/web.php/jobs/ViewJobDetails?job=5303&clientkey=BC9586F35E70BD74D59EC08D93D8EDD5

Curatorial Assistant, State of the Art II: https://www.paycomonline.net/v4/ats/web.php/jobs/ViewJobDetails?job=5014&clientkey=BC9586F35E70BD74D59EC08D93D8EDD5

Call for Author: essay on Carroll Parrott Blue

Carroll Parrott Blue, MFA
carrollpblue@hotmail.com

I am looking for an art scholar who specializes in late 20th and early 21st African American Art who is interested in contributing an introductory chapter on a 60-year review of the works of my work. As artist Carroll Parrott Blue, I am assembling my archive and am open to an interview by the author.

From the 1960s to the present, my work encompasses published written works, still photography, film, video, public art, digital media, digital stories, interactive multimedia, ARC GIS Story Maps, production notes and other materials associated from many of the productions.

The essay that will support the completed archival report should be roughly 6,000-8,000 words with notes and references included. The interview as a transcript will be separate. The main focus of the essay is on an overall or comprehensive analysis of the work. The author should be prepared to engage formal analysis, the history of the technological changes from analog to digital, race and gender theory, and biography.

JOB: Program of Art and Technology @ CalArts

Full Time Faculty Position MFA Art and Technology

The School of Art at the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) invites applications for a full time faculty position in the Program of Art and Technology. The MFA in Art and Technology is a unique studio based program within an Institute that offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the performing, visual and musical arts.

The Art and Technology curriculum is centered on the student’s studio practice, creative research and an exchange of dialogue between peers, visiting artists and faculty. Technical instruction is offered in the creative use of computer programming, digital media and sound, immersive installation, interactive media and hybrid performance. This wide range of instruction is augmented with critiques, lectures and seminars that set out to challenge conventional ideas about what constitutes an art practice in the 21st century.

Requirements and Duties:

A cross-disciplinary studio practice is required, along with a significant record of exhibitions, the ability to engage in creative research and critical theory, art history and five years of professional experience using digital technology and software. At least three years teaching experience at the graduate level within the field of art and technology is expected.

Responsibilities include:
-The successful candidate will be expected to teach a full-time workload that is the equivalent of four (4) courses per semester in the Program in Art and Technology.
– Mentoring graduate students
-Conducting mid-residency and graduation reviews
-Participating in curricular planning, admissions review and assessment for the Art and Technology program
-Attendance at program, school and Institute events
-Sustaining a vibrant exhibition record and achievement in the field of art and technology
Qualifications

-Three (3) or more years teaching at the graduate level.

-An MFA or terminal degree in a field relevant to the position
How to Apply

To apply please submit the following:

-CV
– Letter of application (include teaching philosophy)
– Names and addresses of three references
– Work samples that exhibit a technical and creative use of technology within a contemporary art practice. These work samples should include a relevant combination of the following: published writing samples, relevant websites, up to ten digital images and/or five video excerpts no longer than three minutes each.
-Brief course proposals are also encouraged.

Please submit all media and forms to SlideRoom –

https://calartsfaculty.slideroom.com/#/permalink/program/41975

Review of applications will begin immediately, and will be considered until April 6, 2018

Equity & Diversity

CalArts is proud of its diverse student body and deeply committed to supporting the cultural and artistic aspirations of all its students. A commitment to increasing opportunities for low-income students and currently disenfranchised groups is necessary, as is the desire to work to support institutional goals of equity and diversity in an ongoing way. CalArts is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).

Further Information

CalArts has a multidisciplinary approach to its studies of the arts through six schools: Art, Critical Studies, Dance, Film/Video, Music and Theater. CalArts encourages students to explore and recognize the complexity of the many aspects of the arts. It is supported by a distinguished faculty of practicing artists and provides its Bachelor and Master of Fine Arts students with the hands-on training and exposure necessary for an artist’s growth. CalArts was founded in 1961 and opened in 1969 as the first institution of higher learning in the United States specifically for students interested in the pursuit of degrees in all areas of visual and performing arts.

 

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Papers: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama is a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to American art and visual culture in all media, from the colonial period to the present day. The journal provides a high-caliber international forum for disseminating original research and scholarship and for sustaining a lively engagement with intellectual developments and methodological debates in art history, visual and material cultural studies, museums, and curatorial work. It encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework and seeks to acknowledge in full work by African American, Asian American, Latinx, and Native American artists, makers, curators, art historians, and others engaged in visual cultural production in the United States.

Panorama welcomes submissions that utilize the insights of both traditional and new historical and interpretive approaches to art in the US in both local and global contexts. The editors seek submissions in various formats, including feature length articles (7,000-10,000 words), research notes (maximum of 2,500 words), book and exhibition reviews, and “Bully Pulpit” suggestions–texts that trace a conversation or debate on a topic that is of general interest to the field.

For more information, see: http://journalpanorama.org/submissions/

RFP: Seeking author for Kara Walker essay

Drs. Deborah Johnson and Wendy Oliver, editors of Women Making Art, Women in the Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts since 1960, are searching for additional authors for an updated second edition of the volume. Specifically, we are looking for a scholar interested in contributing a chapter on Kara Walker.

The essay should be roughly 6,000-8,000 words, notes and references included, with a focus on one paradigmatic image (or series) within Walker’s work. The author should be prepared to engage formal analysis, race and gender theory, and biography.

If interested — or with questions — please contact doctorj@providence.edu

JOB: Visiting Assitant Professor, American art and architecture @ Smith College

The Department of Art at Smith College invites applications for a two-year Visiting Assistant Professorship in American art and architecture, to begin in July 2018. We seek someone with interdisciplinary interests who can teach introductory and intermediate undergraduate courses across the entire chronological spectrum of American art and architecture as well as advanced courses in their area of specialization. Candidates with a proven track record in engaging with issues of race and immigration in scholarship and teaching are especially encouraged to apply. A Ph.D. in Art or relevant field is expected by the time of appointment and evidence of independent teaching experience is required. Candidates from groups underrepresented in Art History are encouraged to apply.

Located in Northampton, MA, Smith College is the largest women’s college in the country and is dedicated to excellence in teaching and research across the liberal arts. A faculty of outstanding scholars interact with students in small classes, as advisors, and through student-faculty research projects. The College is a member of the Five College Consortium with Amherst, Hampshire and Mt. Holyoke Colleges, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Students cross-enroll and faculty cross-teach across the Five Colleges. Details about the Department of Art may be found at https://www.smith.edu/academics/art/.

Submit application at http://apply.interfolio.com/49145 with a cover letter, curriculum vitae, and three confidential letters of recommendation. Review of applications will begin on March 15, 2018.

Diversifying the student body, faculty, administration, staff, and curriculum is crucial to the mission of and vision for the College. We are committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in the application process for individuals with disabilities and encourage applicants to request any needed accommodation(s). We value and are committed to a host of diverse populations and cultures, including, but not limited to, those based on ability, age, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, and veteran status.

Smith College is an EO/AA/Vet/Disability Employer. Women, underrepresented racial groups, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

Roma and African Americans share a common struggle, say Cornel West and Margarete Matache

Cornel West has co-authored an article with Margareta Matache, a Roma rights activist and scholar: it was published in The Guardian last Tuesday. As is always the case with Guardian comments, these are as illuminating to read as the article itself. So are the silences of removed and presumably wack comments: there must be at least a half dozen iterations of “This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards.”

It’s been 25 years since West’s Race Matters was first published in 1998; a new edition with a forward by West. In a new introduction for this anniversary edition, West writes: “Race matters in the twenty-first century are part of a moral and spiritual war over resources, power, souls, and sensibilities.” The introductory chapter focuses on US history–distant and past–and the shout outs are issued mostly to US-based academics and activists. Yet as he has for the last decades, West makes his target imperialism which is phenomenon worked out in a number of national varieties. It’s no doubt useful to call out imperialism in the name of anti-racism: West writes that “[r]ace matters are an integral part–though not sole part–of empire matters” and that “imperial democracy has its own structures of domination.”

A decisive turn to critical race art history in Europe was evident in Saturday’s College Art Association conference panel, “Critical Race Art Histories in German, Scandinavia, and Central Europe,” sponsored by the Historian of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art and Architecture, which, like ACRAH, is a CAA Affiliated Society.

 

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A page from Herman Lundborg’s The Swedish Nation and Racial Types (1921), posted at Anthroscape.

This constellation of images is interesting not only because of the project to illustrate perceived mixed race and mixed ethnic appearances, Casta painting-like, but also because some subjects were presented frontally and in profile while others are not. Is “gipsy-ness” obvious enough in the top right frontal portrait? We can head back to Allan Sekula’s “The Body and the Archive” , an examination of the taxonomic photo. Yet, there was something else happening in the many nineteenth- and twetienth-century drawings and prints. (A Google Image search will yield a good number of these representations.) Seems like many Western artists chose the 3/4 profile view to demonstrate ethno-racial particularity. Why? One ear tells all? The shadow on one cheek is more than enough?

Debating Cultural Appropriation in the Art History Classroom

I am always looking for activities that make art history relevant to my students as well as disturb the problematic ways in which our discipline has been framed. Students respond enthusiastically when they are allowed to delve into current events that connect with art’s histories. In order to facilitate what can be heated conversations I…

via Debating Cultural Appropriation in the Art History Classroom — Art History Teaching Resources

In Memoriam: Dr Donna McFarlane O.D.

National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

Dr Donna McFarlane O.D.

The National Gallery of Jamaica was deeply saddened by news of the passing of our colleague, the scholar, curator and activist, Dr Donna McFarlane O.D. last week.

A true visionary, Dr McFarlane was the first Director/ Curator of our sister museum Liberty Hall: Legacy of Marcus Garvey. In Garvey’s time, the Liberty Hall was a meeting place for the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL). The property hosted a range of cultural and intellectual programmes in its heyday. Eventually the property left UNIA hands and was owned by several individuals until it was purchased by the Government of Jamaica, through the Heritage Trust and declared a National Monument in 1987.  Always a passionate advocate for civil rights and African and Diasporic empowerment; Dr McFarlane had returned to Jamaica after completing her Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science and Masters in Developmental Economics. She…

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