CFP: Contribute to an Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture (proposals due Sept. 14, 2018)

Calls for Contributors: Book Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture

Deadline: September 14, 2018

 

The recent rise in problems of immigration and race are of long historical standing.  During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe, increased colonial expansion, industrialization, economic inequality, and nationalism severely tested the assumptions of a shared social fabric. In this, the visual arts performed a key function by amplifying or mitigating racial and ethnic difference. We are seeking proposals for essays that explore representations of race and folk within the context of the disciplines of ethnography and anthropology. The focus of the book will be to examine art’s role in forming social constructions about the interactions between white majority populations with minorities that are indigenous, migratory or nomadic, or relocated through colonization. Proposals are encouraged which look at understudied countries and challenge traditional assumptions, such as perceived homogenous populations (Scandinavia, for example) or those with diverse and shifting multi-ethnic groups, as in Central Europe and Russia. Of particular interest are topics that consider ambiguities and contradict assumptions of uniform binary relations: East-West fusions within racial origins, interracial marriages, fluctuating borders, and migratory populations.  One might consider the fact that the folk were valorized in definitions of national identity simultaneously with the marginalization of indigenous people through racist characterizations and ethnic categorizations.  So too, admiration for the primitive and the popularity of “exotic” people as entertainment co-existed with their denigration.

Proposals are welcome that apply themes from critical race theories, such as the definition of racial identity through social construction, evidence of microaggressions, and practices of essentializing ethnic groups rather than individuals.  How did countries that viewed themselves as progressive and inclusive deal with evidence that contradicted this?  In what ways did multi-ethnic regions foster a common culture while at the same time practicing biological or cultural racism? How did migratory folk populations disrupt conventional definitions of ethnic identity, which were based in part on geography? Proposals are also welcome that consider continuing echoes of these issues later in the twentieth-century; that look at ways in which marginalized minority groups used culture as a means to empower and define themselves; or that focus on the construction of white racial identity.

Proposals should be approximately 300 words and are due by September 14.

Send proposals and c.v. to: Marsha Morton, mortonmarsha10@gmail.com and Barbara Larson, blarson@uwf.edu

 

 

Advertisements

CFP: Nineteenth Century Studies Association Annual Conference 2019

40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association

March 7-9, 2019

Kansas City, Missouri

EXPLORATIONS

The NCSA conference committee invites proposals that examine the theme of explorations in the history, literature, art, music and popular culture of the nineteenth century.

Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome from North American, British, European, Asian, African and worldwide perspectives.

From the early nineteenth century, when Lewis and Clark paddled through the Kansas City area on their way up the Missouri River to explore the North American continent, through the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, the building of factories and railroads, the mechanization of agriculture, and the advent of mass-produced cultural artifacts, the American Midwest became a crossroads for explorers and inventors, hucksters and entrepreneurs, artists and musicians, poets and dreamers who pursued their discoveries toward destinations made possible by the wide-open spaces of the Great Plains. In this way, the Kansas City region is emblematic of a larger set of trends in the global evolution of culture that radically altered the fundamental conditions of human existence during the nineteenth century.

How does the discovery of new geographical knowledge change the perception of human possibility?

How do innovations in science and technology affect the development of literature, music and art?

How does the recovery of previously unheard voices – of women, of workers, of ethnic minorities and people of color – influence the understanding of social history in America and the wider world?

Topics for investigation include encounters between Western explorers and indigenous people; the impact of steamships and railways upon changing perceptions of time and space; resistance and accommodation between traditional folkways and mass-produced culture; and the development of new idioms in literature, art and music to express the broader horizons of nineteenth-century self-awareness.

Proposals are due by September 30, 2018. Send 300-word abstracts (as an email attachment in MS Word format) along with a one-page CV to ncsa2019@gmail.com

Call for Roundtable Proposals:

Roundtable discussions provide conference attendees the opportunity to engage in spirited conversation and collaborative exchange of information and resources. The format of roundtable discussions will be lively, interactive discourse among presenters and conference participants, not lecture or panel-style delivery.

Roundtable sessions will be 80 minutes long. Presenters should regard themselves primarily as facilitators and should limit their own prepared remarks to five minutes or less. Extensive collaboration among the presenters before the conference is encouraged, since the goal is to foster extensive, diverse, and cogent perspectives on interdisciplinary research topics of general interest to NCSA members.

Roundtables should be pre-organized by a group of 4-8 presenters. To propose a roundtable topic, please send a single 300-word abstract describing the general topic of the roundtable (as an email attachment in MS Word format) to ncsa2019@gmail.com.

Your abstract should include the proposed session title and the full name of each presenter, with their email and phone contacts, job title and affiliation. Indicate which presenter has agreed to serve as discussion moderator. Please be sure to confirm the participation of all presenters before submitting your abstract.

Roundtable proposals are due by September 30, 2018.

Conference Venue: The conference will be held at the newly renovated Marriott Country Club Plaza in midtown Kansas City, adjacent to the open-air shops and restaurants of the Country Club Plaza and in easy walking distance of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Conference Registration will open in December 2018. AV requirements are due January 1, early registration closes on January 20, and registration ends on February 20.

Conference website: http://www.ncsaweb.net/Current-Conference

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture”

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture.” Accepted papers will appear in a guest-edited section of Panorama issue 5.1 (May 2019).

Amateurism, as both a praxis and an attitude, has been a fundamental concept for the development and reception of American art. In the Colonial period, for instance, trained painters and self-taught limners alike were measured against Europe’s professional portraitists, and producers of decorative arts were often viewed as craftspeople or artisans rather than fine artists. And during the nineteenth century itinerant painters and so-called “folk artists” established careers that had little in common with those of artists now recognized as American masters, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church. At the same time, however, Americans (Benjamin Franklin, for example) have long admired the “Yankee ingenuity” and “useful knowledge” of self-starters and laypeople.

In the twentieth century amateurism emerged as an invaluable foil for American modernists: Robert Henri encouraged the painting of what one knows rather than what one learns; the regionalist artists disavowed the theoretical expertise of the Stieglitz Circle artists and writers; and the junk stylings of some Neo-Dadaists were complemented by their slapdash techniques and a casual disregard for “high art.” Snapshots, home movies, and hobby art are more obvious, though historically far less visible, examples of artforms that have been classified as amateur, and today, of course, DIY productions, both digital and analog, abound, and everyone with a smartphone is an accidental curator.

The various historical and contemporary categorizations of Native American visual culture are especially relevant to these themes. We know, for instance, that Abstract Expressionists borrowed from supposedly “primitive” artforms to heighten the aura of untutored amateurism around their works. But we also know that appropriation is just one context, and a flawed one at that, for analyzing Native American art, which for better and for worse, often finds itself at the crossroads of the vernacular and the institutional. And, of course, Native American artists have negotiated amateur and professional identities for their own purposes, in order to advance sovereignty, for example, or to participate in markets not entirely their own.

Refreshingly, scholars, curators, and publishers have begun to examine the art and visual culture of amateurism in recent years: there is the enduring appeal of the photographic snapshot and accompanying “snapshot aesthetic,” recent books and articles on amateur film, successful folk art exhibitions, and the National Gallery of Art’s current exhibition Outliers and American Vanguard Art. Nevertheless, the significance of the amateur-professional dialectic to American art requires more critical attention, and, at a time when the arts and humanities are subjected to more and more evaluative measures, the insouciance of amateur art seems more and more urgent.

Panorama seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words that take innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of amateur art and its material, historical, theoretical terrain. We encourage authors to consider the unique advantages of the journal’s online platform, which permits various digital enhancements, such as high-resolution images with zoom capabilities, the embedding of moving images and films, interactive maps, and the reconstruction of historical exhibitions, to name a few possibilities.

To propose a paper, please send a 500-word abstract and curriculum vitae to Justin Wolff: justin.wolff@maine.edu.

Deadline for proposals: May 15, 2018

Deadline for papers: December 31, 2018

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Papers: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama is a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to American art and visual culture in all media, from the colonial period to the present day. The journal provides a high-caliber international forum for disseminating original research and scholarship and for sustaining a lively engagement with intellectual developments and methodological debates in art history, visual and material cultural studies, museums, and curatorial work. It encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework and seeks to acknowledge in full work by African American, Asian American, Latinx, and Native American artists, makers, curators, art historians, and others engaged in visual cultural production in the United States.

Panorama welcomes submissions that utilize the insights of both traditional and new historical and interpretive approaches to art in the US in both local and global contexts. The editors seek submissions in various formats, including feature length articles (7,000-10,000 words), research notes (maximum of 2,500 words), book and exhibition reviews, and “Bully Pulpit” suggestions–texts that trace a conversation or debate on a topic that is of general interest to the field.

For more information, see: http://journalpanorama.org/submissions/

RFP: Seeking author for Kara Walker essay

Drs. Deborah Johnson and Wendy Oliver, editors of Women Making Art, Women in the Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts since 1960, are searching for additional authors for an updated second edition of the volume. Specifically, we are looking for a scholar interested in contributing a chapter on Kara Walker.

The essay should be roughly 6,000-8,000 words, notes and references included, with a focus on one paradigmatic image (or series) within Walker’s work. The author should be prepared to engage formal analysis, race and gender theory, and biography.

If interested — or with questions — please contact doctorj@providence.edu

Research on Louisiana to Northern California African-American migration, pre-1980s

A San Jose State University sociologist is documenting African-American migration from Louisiana to San Francisco Bay Area before the 1980s and the subsequent resettlement experiences of the migrants.

  • If you or your parents migrated from Louisiana and settled in the San Francisco Bay Area prior to the 1980s, you are invited to participate in a research study conducted by Faustina M. DuCros, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences at San José State University.
  • The purpose of this research study is to document the migration and re-settlement experiences of migrants and children of migrants from Louisiana in the San Francisco Bay Area.
  • If you volunteer for this research study, you will be asked to participate in an audio-recorded life history interview that will last about two hours; in some cases additional sessions may be needed to complete the life history. During the interview, you will be asked about your background, your migration experiences or those of your parents, and your experiences in the Bay Area. The interview will be conducted at a time and location convenient for you.
  • Participation is entirely voluntary and confidential. You may stop your participation at any time without penalty.
  • If you have questions or would like to participate, please contact:Faustina DuCros, Ph.D.
    San José State University
    One Washington Square
  • San José, CA 95125Louisiana-Migrants@sjsu.edu

    408-924-5325

CFP Craft Studies Symposium–abstracts due Mar. 1, 2018

Call for Papers

Shared Ground: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to Craft Studies

Presented by the Center for Craft, Bard Graduate Center, and the Museum of Arts and Design

September 20-22, 2018

New York, New York

Deadline: March 1, 2018

Click here to apply

Bard Graduate Center, the Center for Craft, and the Museum of Arts and Design are pleased to issue a call for papers for the forthcoming Shared Ground: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to Craft Studies symposium to be held in New York City September 20-22, 2018.

The “material-turn” in the humanities has brought increased attention to the study of craft in art and design history, decorative arts and material culture studies, as well as other disciplines, such as anthropology and science and technology studies. Institutions are combining academic traditions of the humanities and social sciences with “learning by doing” pedagogy and the influence of global studies has led scholars to research, understand, and contextualize craft outside of the studio craft or the arts and craft movements. Beyond the humanities and social sciences, fields ranging from architecture and urban planning to engineering and computer science have begun to explore the craft-like nature and implications of their research and professional practice.

Craft studies is at a critical moment as more disciplines turn their research towards craft and more scholars expand the geographic and temporal boundaries of the field. The 2018 Shared Ground symposium will explore cross-disciplinary approaches to craft studies, with an eye towards intersecting and divergent theories, methodologies, and approaches in this emerging area of study.

DETAILS

Abstracts (up to 250 words) for 20 min papers and a brief curriculum vitae must be submitted here on or before March 1, 2018 at 11:59pm EST. We are looking for interdisciplinary knowledge and welcome papers from all disciplines. Alternative presentation formats are welcome, and graduate students are encouraged to apply. Abstracts will be subject to peer review.

For additional information, please visit www.cccdnow.org/sharedground or contact Marilyn Zapf, Assistant Director and Curator, the Center for Craft at mzapf@craftcreativitydesign.org

Residency (Orange Co., CA) for Artists and Art Historians–Apply now through Dec. 15, 2017

The 36 Chase & Barns Residency is extending its application deadline for all  interested art history/curatorial studies candidates.  The 36 Chase & Barns Residency offers spaces to up to three visual artists and one art history/curatorial studies candidate each term. 
We are still actively looking for strong applicants from diverse backgrounds, working in the areas of curatorial studies and arthistory research. We will continue to accept applications to fill this vacancy for the March- May 2018 residency until Friday, December 15th.  
Art historians and curatorial candidates of color and/or any applicants who are conducting research and writing criticism specifically addressing the many overlooked contributions of female artists, artists of color and artists from the LGBTQ communities are strongly encouraged to apply. 
We are no longer accepting applications from visual artists for the March- May 2018 residency term. Our next residency term will begin in July of 2018.
Click here to apply or go directly here.

2017 William H. Johnson Prize Application——-Deadline Nov. 16, 2017, 6 pm Eastern

2017 WILLIAM H. JOHNSON PRIZE
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION: THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017, 6PM Eastern Time

The William H. Johnson Foundation for the Arts is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that seeks to encourage African American artists early in their careers by offering financial grants. The Johnson Foundation awards grants to individuals who work in the following media: painting, photography, sculpture, printmaking, installation and/or new genre.

The William H. Johnson Prize is awarded annually to an early-career African American artist. For our purposes, “early-career” is a flexible term that should be interpreted liberally to include artists who have finished their academic work within twelve years from the year that a prize is awarded. For example, a person who finished their studies in 2005 is eligible to apply in 2017, but not in 2018. Age is not determinative, and artists who have not earned BFAs or MFAs are still eligible so long as they have not been working as a professional artist for more than twelve years.

The 2017 William H. Johnson Prize is $25,000 and the winner will be announced in December 2017.

APPLYING FOR THE 2017 JOHNSON PRIZE

READY TO BEGIN THE APPLICATION?
All applications must be submitted online, and the application must be started and completed in the same online session. Changes cannot be made to an application after it’s been submitted. The 2017 Johnson Prize Application Worksheet is provided as a tool for applicants to use prior to starting the online application, to ensure that applicants have prepared all the materials required for completing and submitting the application.

QUESTIONS?
Take a look at the foundation’s responses to Frequently Asked Questions.

 

 

CFP: Black Portraitures IV; DEADLINE EXTENDED: 10/1

Event Timing: March 15-17, 2018.
Event Address: Havana, Cuba

BLACK PORTRAITURE[S] IV: The Color of Silence is the eighth conference in a series of international conversations to assess and break new ground in the fields of African, African American and African diasporic art and art history. This forum also provides various approaches to interpreting the representations, ambiguous meanings, and erasures of the black body in visual, social, material and expressive cultures. Over a span of fifteen years, artists, activists, patrons, musicians, writers, collectives, journalists, educators and scholars have come from across the globe to reflect on why and how conceptions of “blackness” shape historical imaginaries and subvert political ideologies. This is an opportunity to situate not only various macro-histories but also the micro-histories that inform a genealogy of innovative interrogations into the social structures that articulate—or silence—black subjectivity.

The conference aims to explore the aesthetic representation of the frameworks and social relations in which black bodies are seen and unseen, in which black lives are lived freely and under constraint, and most crucially, the representation of black subjects themselves. Examples abound throughout the African diaspora of how the humanity of black subjects is rendered invisible or hyper-visible—or both simultaneously (Cuba’s “antiracism,” Brazil’s “racial democracy,” South Africa’s “rainbow nation,” Jamaica’s “out of many, one people” motto, and the “postracial” U.S. are just a few examples). We invite papers that interrogate the complex intersections of race, history, culture and art.

In past conferences, participants have offered generative exchanges on everything from tourism and pop culture (art, fashion, music, dance, film), to revolutionary movements, pedagogy, the history of colonization and its impact on cultural expression, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and the contemporary entanglements of the global marketplace. With this latest iteration of Black Portraitures, we seek papers and panel proposals that probe and build off of these themes and provide new methodologies, and even new questions, for the 21st century.

Deadline for submissions: October 1, 2017
Notice of acceptance: October 27, 2017

All proposals must be submitted through completion of the online form. Follow the link at http://hutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu/black-portraitures-iv

The conference will be held on Thursday through Saturday, March 15-17, 2018, in Havana, Cuba.  As the status of the US/Cuba relations are in flux, more information about travel will be available when the new Administration’s policies are enacted.  We will keep you posted.

Please note that as with most academic conferences, we are unable to provide institutional funding for travel to Black Portraitures.

Black Portraiture[s] IV is a collaboration with the U.S. Ambassador to Cuba, Jeffrey DeLaurentis; Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, Harvard University; New York University’s LaPietra Dialogues, Tisch School of the Arts, and the Institute for African American Affairs.

Please contact blackportraitures@gmail.com with questions.