JOB: Visiting Prof @ Portland State University

Portland State University College of the Arts and the School of Art + Design invite applications for the James DePreist Visiting Professorship. One of the first African-American conductors on the world stage, James DePreist helmed orchestras from Amsterdam to Tokyo and is credited with building the Oregon Symphony into one worthy of international acclaim. A National Medal of Arts winner, poet and educator, Mr. DePreist demonstrated a lifelong commitment to the power of arts education and the importance of equal access. This Professorship seeks to perpetuate his exemplary spirit by supporting inclusive experiences and diverse, non-western perspectives in art and design education.

The teaching focus of each new Professorship is determined by the current needs of the School of Art + Design in concert with the interests and expertise of the successful candidate. For the 2021-2023 position we seek a scholar with an active record and expertise in African Diaspora or Native American/Indigenous art history of any time period, including contemporary.

This is a 1.0 FTE, two-year position, renewable for a maximum total of four years. The position begins September 16, 2021.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities

Full-time Fixed Term position teaches 9 classes (36 credits) during the three-quarter academic year. Instructional workload reduction may be made to accommodate recruitment and outreach activities, advising and mentoring students, committee work, curriculum or special program development.

The successful candidate will have an active scholarly research agenda; a commitment to teaching the introductory art history survey as well as upper-division courses in the area of his/her/their expertise; and an interest in the possibility of engaging local collections of pertinent material, for example the Native American holdings of the Portland Art Museum.

To apply, please submit:

A letter of interest. 
A CV.
A statement of teaching philosophy.
A statement of research interests.
Evidence of teaching effectiveness.
Writing sample(s).
Full contact information for three references (including phone numbers and email addresses).

Review of applications will begin April 12th, 2021 and will continue until the finalists are identified. Incomplete applications will not be reviewed.

For further information, please contact Professor Alberto McKelligan Hernández at alberto6@pdx.edu or (503) 725-3366.

https://jobs.hrc.pdx.edu/postings/34365

CFP: Landscapes of Slavery, Landscapes of Freedom: The African diaspora and the American built environment

Harvard Graduate School of Design

November 5-7, 2021

Histories of the Atlantic world have focused both on the adaptation of ideas from the Old Continent to the new and on the material and cultural exchanges occurring throughout the centuries. To complement this scholarship, studies have been conducted on the slave trade between West Africa, mainland North America and the Caribbean, which formed the base of plantation economy and helped build the fortunes of many landowners in the colonial and antebellum period of the republic. Recent scholarship has acknowledged the violence of the archive of white records of slavery that have silenced the voices of the enslaved, and this work has sought to recover the experiences and vantage points of slavery’s victims.

This forum will address a more specific set of questions that have to do not only with the unique contribution the forced labor of the African diaspora and Afro-descendants brought to the plantation economy, but also with the potential exchange of knowledge about gardening and cultivation practices across the Atlantic, both from West Africa and between the Caribbean and mainland North America. On occasion the cultivation of specific staple crops such as rice depended upon the expertise of the enslaved. More generally, many of those forced to labor on their masters’ plantations simultaneously worked on small plots of land within their quarters, enabling them to exercise limited agency with regard to the extent and type of crop cultivation for their own use and consumption. When slavery legally ended, the exploitation of black labor continued, although over time black land-ownership increased and perhaps involved different approaches to land use than was common among white small-holders. Reconstructing these histories and those of the environments Africans built and cultivated for others and for themselves is challenging, as there is only a limited archival record that contains few enslaved voices.

This conference seeks to engage with the work of archaeologists, ethnobotanists, cultural geographers, anthropologists, and of experts in African American Studies and oral history in order to form a more complete picture of the African contribution to the shaping of the North American landscape.

Proposals for unpublished papers are welcome from scholars in any field. Topics might include (but are not limited to) such subjects as:

• the relationship between place-making and slave labor in North America and its cultural, social and economic underpinnings.

• the adaptation of imported African horticultural and agricultural knowledge in the Caribbean and North America.

• the exchange of knowledge related to agricultural and gardening practices between the Caribbean and the North American mainland.

• Atlantic World foodways.

• crop cultivation and food growing practices on plantation sites indebted to forced labor.

• the ways in which slavery and forced labor made intensive cultivation and production possible.

• the place-making of former slaves in both rural and urban environments.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words are to be headed with the applicant’s name, title of the paper, professional affiliation, and contact information. A two-page CV should also be included in the submission. Please send proposals by March 15, 2021 to: Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University. Email: rfabiani@gsd.harvard.edu

Authors of accepted proposals will be required to submit the complete text of their papers by June 15, and carry out potential revisions by August 30, 2021, after which the symposium chair will circulate them among the speakers. Publication of the essays presented at the conference is anticipated.

JOB: Africa/African Diaspora @ Courtauld

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in the arts of Africa and/or the African diaspora, within the broad period from c. 1800 to the present. This appointment offers an exciting opportunity to transform The Courtauld’s teaching and research, and to provide academic leadership in fields of critical importance to the discipline, within and beyond the institute. It is one of two new posts in this broad field, the other being a Professorship.

We invite applications from early and mid-career scholars with a profile in research and teaching commensurate with their career stage.

These posts are part of The Courtauld’s commitment to a more inclusive and diverse curriculum. They are generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Application is online. You will also need to include a CV and a supporting statement of no more than 1500 words. You should also give the names of 3 referees.

The supporting statement should set out how you meet the criteria of this position, and include a brief statement about your research profile. This should include your current and future research plans, your teaching plans and experience, your administrative experience, and potential to contribute to the research profile and impact of The Courtauld. Please address the criteria set out in the Person Specification when preparing your statement.

Interviews for the position will take place on Thursday 5th and Friday 6th December 2019.

If you would like an informal conversation about the roles please contact Dr Jo Applin, Head of Art History. jo.applin@courtauld.ac.uk

https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=323

 

JOB: African/African Diaspora/Latinx or Latin American; Asst Prof @ USC

University of Southern California (CA) – TT Assistant Professor of African and/or African Diasporic and/or Latinx and/or Latin American History of Art, Visual, and/or Material Culture, post-1750

The Department of Art History in the Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA) invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in African and/or African Diasporic and/or Latinx and/or Latin American history of art, visual, and/or material culture, post-1750. Applicants may conduct research in one or more of these areas, and various methodological and theoretical approaches are welcome. We have a particular interest in scholarship that contributes to increasing the diversity of the department’s intellectual life and offerings. This position is expected to begin August 2020.

The successful candidate will teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level and participate actively in the intellectual life of the department and the university. Candidates must possess a Ph.D. at the time of appointment and show exceptional scholarly promise. Interested candidates should provide 1) a cover letter that includes a discussion of research and teaching, 2) a curriculum vitae, 3) two writing samples, at least one of which should be a chapter from a dissertation or book manuscript, and 4) the names and contact information of three referees who will be contacted in a system-generated email to provide letters. In order to be considered for this position, applicants are required to submit an electronic USC application; follow this job link or paste in a browser: https://usccareers.usc.edu/job/los- angeles/assistant-professor-of-african-and-or-african-diasporic-and-or-latinx-and-or-latin-american- history/1209/13261319 . For full consideration, applicants are encouraged to apply by November 1, 2019.

USC is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, protected veteran status, disability, or any other characteristic protected by law or USC policy. USC will consider for employment all qualified applicants with criminal histories in a manner consistent with the requirements of the Los Angeles Fair Chance Initiative for Hiring ordinance.

 

JOB: Open Rank, Art of Africa/African Diaspora @Tyler School of Art, Temple University

The Department of Art History at Tyler School of Art of Temple University invites applications for a full-time tenure-track faculty position at the Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor rank in the specialization of the arts and visual culture of Africa and the African Diaspora, to commence Fall 2019. Though the chronological parameters of research are flexible, the ideal candidate should be engaged in methods of teaching and scholarship that study cross-cultural encounters and exchanges, examining the ways in which art is produced and circulates through networks of trade and immigration, and how its discourse is formed by the dynamics of race, colonialism, post-colonialism, and globalization.

As an open rank position, the successful candidate will hold the PhD and demonstrate an appropriate level of teaching experience, scholarly research and publication. Candidates should demonstrate familiarity with best teaching practices and with innovative instructional design and technologies. Candidates should also have experience with department and college-wide service and demonstrate professional accomplishments in the discipline. The position involves teaching at the undergraduate level (including Art History majors, studio majors, and non-majors), and teaching and advising at the M.A. and Ph.D. levels (including MFAs and Masters of Art Education). Tyler’s Department of Art History has a faculty of 10 full-time members who specialize in areas ranging from the ancient world to Global Contemporary. Art History at Temple is part of the highly-ranked Tyler School of Art and there is dynamic synergy among the programs in the school including six modern and contemporary specialists. The department is located on Temple University’s main Philadelphia campus and is housed in a state-of-the-art facility. Temple offers the resources of a major university in a culturally rich city and region.

The letter of application should include a statement describing research and teaching interests, philosophy, and experience. Candidates are encouraged to address the ways in which they could contribute to Temple’s institutional mission and commitment to excellence and diversity and to Tyler’s engagement in interdisciplinarity. In addition, the application should include a CV, name and contact information for three references, two sample syllabi for courses, and a writing sample. Finalists will be expected to supply official degree transcripts and evaluations for courses taught.

Please send all materials electronically by December 31, 2018. To apply, please visit temple.slideroom.com to set up an account and upload your application materials to Slideroom: https://temple.slideroom.com/#/permalink/program/46514. If you need assistance during the upload, email: support@slideroom.com. Tyler School of Art is an affirmative action/equalopportunity employer committed to increasing and sustaining its diverse academic community

Address further inquiries to Prof. Jane DeRose Evans, Search Committee Chair (AHjob17@temple.edu).

FEL: Post doctoral fellowship in Art History of the African Diaspora @ Cooper Union

Applications are invited for the Cooper Union Postdoctoral Fellowship in Art History.

Salary: $45,000 plus health insurance, travel and research funds, access to a library consortium including Cooper Union, NYU, and the New School.

This two-year teaching fellowship in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences is open to individuals who have been awarded the Ph.D. in art history or an allied field after September 1, 2013. Applicants who have not yet been awarded the degree but will have degree in hand by September 1, 2018, must submit a letter from their department chair confirming that the degree is expected by the start date of the fellowship. The period of the fellowship is September 1, 2018, through May 31, 2020. Priority will be given to candidates with a specialty in the arts of the African Diaspora.

The position requires teaching three courses per academic year: An elective designed by the fellow in her or his area of specialization, and a Fall and Spring section of “Modern to Contemporary: An Introduction to Art History.” This survey is part of the Foundation curriculum for School of Art students but open to all Cooper Union students.

In addition to teaching, the fellow will participate in an ongoing interrogation of global art perspectives and their integration into the survey. Our revisions will effect long-term curricular change within the Foundation Program.

The fellow will partake in the intellectual life of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and of Cooper Union in general, and will give one research presentation each academic year.

The Cooper Union was founded in 1859 by philanthropist Peter Cooper to provide an education “equal to the best” to all who qualify, regardless of race, religion, gender, wealth or social status. Today, The Cooper Union provides a rigorous professional education in the Schools of Art, Architecture, and Engineering, including a broad curriculum offered by the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. Fostering a culture of collaboration among a diverse student body and faculty, The Cooper Union teaches students that art, architecture, and engineering have cultural, environmental, and ethical contexts and consequences. As students develop their professional abilities, they recognize their responsibility to advance science and art and to create a sustainable future.

Read more about the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences https://cooper.edu/humanities and the School of Art https://cooper.edu/art.

The Search Committee will begin candidate reviews immediately and continue until the position is filled. Please apply promptly to be considered for an interview at the CAA Annual Conference, Los Angeles, February 21-24, 2018.

A cover letter
A current c.v.
A two-page description of the candidate’s current and future research plans, teaching experience and philosophy
Three letters of recommendation

This is a unionized position.

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Submit resume and cover letter to:
Human Resources
30 Cooper Square, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003

Or email to: hr@cooper.edu

 

JOB: Assistant/Associate Professor, Arts and Visual Culture of Africa and/or its Diaspora @ Queen’s University

The Department of Art History and Art Conservation in the Faculty of Arts and Science, in conjunction with the Agnes Etherington Art Centre (AEAC), at Queen’s University, invites applications for a Queen’s National Scholar (QNS) position at the rank of Associate or Assistant Professor with a specialization in the Arts and Visual Culture of Africa and/or its Diaspora (historical or contemporary). This is a tenured or tenure-track position with a preferred start date of July 1, 2018. Further information on the Queen’s National Scholar Program can be found on the website of the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research) at: http://queensu.ca/vpr/prizes-awards/queens-national-scholars.

Open to scholars from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds, preference will be given to established candidates who have as a primary field African and/or African Diaspora arts and visual culture, and a secondary strength in curatorial or museum studies. The successful candidate will have a record of scholarly research and publication; an interest in theoretical or contextual approaches such as Black studies, critical race studies, and/or critical museology; a record of collaborative or community-based scholarship and a demonstrated capacity for experiential teaching and learning; and a record of successful curatorial projects. Appointees will teach at the undergraduate and graduate levels, participate in graduate supervision at the MA and PhD levels across the university, and fulfill a curatorial role at the AEAC, which holds an outstanding collection of Central and West African art from the late 19th to the mid-20th century. https://agnes.queensu.ca/collections/african/.

This position complements and extends existing research and teaching strengths in the study of art and visual cultures within the Department of Art History and Art Conservation. The successful candidate will establish new, as well as expand current research networks, work collaboratively across departments, and advance the impact of Queen’s research and collections nationally and internationally. At the AEAC, the successful candidate will contribute towards exhibition and collections development, including modern and contemporary arts of Africa and its diaspora, research and programming, and lead student learning experiences including internships, gallery-focused seminars, and practica.

Candidates should have a PhD or equivalent degree completed at the start date of the appointment. The successful candidate will provide evidence of high quality scholarly output that demonstrates potential for independent research leading to peer assessed publications and the securing of external research funding, as well as strong potential for outstanding teaching contributions, and an ongoing commitment to academic and pedagogical excellence in support of the department’s programs. Candidates must provide evidence of an ability to work collaboratively in an interdisciplinary and student-centered environment. The successful candidate will be required to make substantive contributions through service to the department, the Faculty, the University, and/or the broader community including the AEAC. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. This position is subject to final budgetary approval by the University.

The Queen’s National Scholar Program expects that the successful candidate will demonstrate their ability to provide a rich and rewarding learning experience to all their students, and to develop a research program that aligns well with the University’s priorities. Further information on teaching and research priorities at Queen’s is available in the Queen’s Academic Plan and the Queen’s Strategic Research Plan

http://www.queensu.ca/strategicplanning/academic. http://www.queensu.ca/strategicplanning/research.

The University invites applications from all qualified individuals. Queen’s is committed to employment equity and diversity in the workplace and welcomes applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, in accordance with Canadian immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority.

To comply with federal laws, the University is obliged to gather statistical information as to how many applicants for each job vacancy are Canadian citizens / permanent residents of Canada. Applicants need not identify their country of origin or citizenship; however, all applications must include one of the following statements: “I am a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”; OR, “I am not a Canadian citizen / permanent resident of Canada”. Applications that do not include this information will be deemed incomplete.

A complete application consists of:

  • a cover letter (including one of the two statements regarding Canadian citizenship / permanent resident status specified in the previous paragraph);
  • a current Curriculum Vitae (including a list of publications);
  • a statement of research interests;
  • a statement of teaching interests and experience (including teaching outlines and evaluations if available); and,
  • three letters of reference to be sent directly by the referees to Professor Joan M. Schwartz, Department Head at the address below.

The deadline for applications is January 8, 2018. Applicants are encouraged to send all documents in their application packages electronically as PDFs to Professor Joan M. Schwartz at schwartz@queensu.ca, although hard copy applications may be submitted to:

Joan M. Schwartz, PhD, FRSC

Professor and Head

Department of Art History and Art Conservation

Ontario Hall 318C

67 University Avenue

Queen’s University

Kingston, Ontario

CANADA K7L 3N6

The University will provide support in its recruitment processes to applicants with disabilities, including accommodation that takes into account an applicant’s accessibility needs. If you require accommodation during the interview process, please contact Diane Platt in The Department of Art History and Art Conservation, at plattd@queensu.ca.

Academic staff at Queen’s University are governed by a Collective Agreement between the University and the Queen’s University Faculty Association (QUFA), which is posted at http://queensu.ca/facultyrelations/faculty-librarians-and-archivists/collective-agreement and at http://www.qufa.ca.

Appointments are subject to review and final approval by the Principal. Candidates holding an existing tenure-track or continuing-adjunct appointment at Queen’s will not be considered.

 

DIGITAL: First Blacks in the Americas: The African Presence in The Dominican Republic — African Diaspora, Ph.D.

New Digital Project: First Blacks in the Americas:

via DIGITAL: First Blacks in the Americas: The African Presence in The Dominican Republic — African Diaspora, Ph.D.

All Power to the People: Black Panthers @50: Exhibition, Anniversary Commemoration, and Symposium (Fall 2016) at the Oakland Museum of California

The Panthers, in more ways than one, sought to visualize racial identity. Their model continues to inform new movements across the globe.

Revolutionary Art (circa 1969) by Emory Douglas, Black Panther Minister of Culture, Oakland, CA.

posters-still.

See: Black Panther exhibition and programs at OMCA

CONF: Black Portraiture Revisited II – Feb. 19-20, 2016 @NYU

See Black Portraiture Conference @NYU Feb. 2016