JOB: Assistant Professor, Americas/African American @ Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Department of Art History at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is currently seeking applications for a full-time tenure-track position, beginning Fall 2018, at the Assistant Professor rank in the area of the Art of the Americas with an emphasis on African-American art, architecture and/or visual culture and new media studies.  Candidates would have the opportunity to engage with the department’s programs in cultural heritage and preservation studies (CHAPS) and/or museum and curatorial studies.

Qualifications:
Ph.D. in Art History, American Studies, or a closely-related field required by the start of the appointment.

Applicants should have an outstanding research program and proven dedication to teaching.  The successful applicant will help to enhance departmental collaboration with other units across the University.  Job duties include research and teaching both in the undergraduate and graduate programs in Art History.

Application Instructions:
Applicants should submit a cover letter detailing their research and teaching interests, curriculum vitae, and names and contact information of three referees via Interfolio to Professor Erik Thunø, Chair, Department of Art History, 71 Hamilton St., New Brunswick, NJ 08901.  Priority given to complete applications on file by November 1, 2017.

Link to apply through Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/45081

Equal Employment Opportunity Statement
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.  Qualified applicants will be considered for employment without regard to race, creed, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, disability status, genetic information, protected veteran status, military service or any other category protected by law.  As an institution, we value diversity of background and opinion, and prohibit discrimination or harassment on the basis of any legally protected class in the areas of hiring, recruitment, promotion, transfer, demotion, training, compensation pay, fringe benefits, layoff, termination or any other terms and condition of employment.

Advertisements

JOB: Assistant/Associate Professor of American Art History @ University of Maryland

The Department of Art History & Archaeology at the University of Maryland, College Park, invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track appointment in American art history, with a specialization or sub-specialization in African American art history.  The appointment will be at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor, to begin in the fall of 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter. Candidates should be able to teach courses in the field of American art history and visual culture, and African American art history, and should demonstrate high scholarly potential.  Candidates’ specialization may fall within any field of American art history inclusively defined, from the Colonial through the modern eras, including the arts of the Atlantic world.  This appointee will actively collaborate with the programming and research initiatives of the University’s David C. Driskell Center for the Study of Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora.  Interest in cross-disciplinary teaching and research with faculty in other fields at the University, as well as collaboration with curators at area museums, will be welcome.  A Ph.D. in Art History or a related field is required for appointment.

Faculty are expected to make significant contributions to knowledge through innovative research and publication, to teach and advise with excellence at the undergraduate and graduate levels,  including students from underrepresented groups, and to fulfill reasonable service obligations to the academic and local communities. We are looking for outstanding scholars with an interest in the broad context of the history of American and African American art who are committed to contributing diverse perspectives to the Department, the University, and the community.

Applications should include a letter of application (with a brief statement of teaching philosophy), curriculum vitae, a graduate transcript, two writing samples, and the email address of three reference providers. (Writing samples might be scholarly articles or dissertation chapters. If including one or two dissertation chapters, please also include the dissertation’s introduction with one of these files.) Candidates must have Ph.D. in hand by July 31, 2018. Questions may be addressed to the Chair of the Search Committee, Professor Steven Mansbach, at mansbach@umd.edu. To assure full consideration, please submit all materials by November 13, 2017 through https://ejobs.umd.edu/. Where possible, we will conduct preliminary interviews at the annual meeting of the CAA in Los Angeles, February 21-24, 2018. This search is contingent upon available funding.

The Department of Art History and Archaeology values diversity. A goal of the search is to increase the diversity of the faculty in the Department of Art History and Archaeology and across the College of Arts and Humanities; and we therefore welcome applicants from groups historically underrepresented in academia, such as black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Alaskan Native, Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders, and protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.

The University of Maryland, College Park, an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, complies with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations regarding nondiscrimination and affirmative action; all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment. The University is committed to a policy of equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, physical or mental disability, protected veteran status, age, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, creed, marital status, political affiliation, personal appearance, or on the basis of rights secured by the First Amendment, in all aspects of employment, educational programs and activities, and admissions.

Internal Number: * 103898

Candidates must have Ph.D. in hand by July 31, 2018

CFP: “A Way/s From Home: Blackness Across Nations” @ CAA2018

The following session is for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February, 21 – 24, 2018. Proposals from ACRAH members most welcome.

A Way/s from Home: Blackness across Nations
Chair(s): Julie L. McGee, University of Delaware, mcgee@udel.edu

In 1964, African American writer and artist Allen Polite, living then in Stockholm, organized “10 American Negro Artist[s] Living and Working in Europe” for Copenhagen’s Den Frie, one of the oldest venues for contemporary art in Denmark. Polite included work by Harvey Cropper, Beauford Delaney, Herbert Gentry, Arthur Hardie, Clifford Jackson, Sam Middleton, Earl Miller, Norma Morgan, Larry Potter, and Walter Williams. Polite’s justification for the grouping was poetic if not opaque: “In short, apart from their distinguishing racial features these exhibitors have only this in common: they are all living in Europe at present. And that is natural enough when one considers the unwritten tradition in art history that makes the artist a wanderer, an observer and digestor [sic] of cultures; a restless soul in search of the images and symbols.” Many black artists took up residence in Europe after WWII to study or to live on a semi-permanent basis. Many found both camaraderie and exhibition opportunities with other African American artists living abroad. To what extent they escaped racial discrimination or exchanged one kind for another is debatable: personal, conceptual, and artistic freedoms and external perceptions of blackness are codependent. Disputes over artistic freedom and both real and hypothetical homefront responsibilities haunt this history and artistic practice. Europe’s inconsistent place within a “freedom narrative” illuminates the complexity of blackness and artistic agency on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. This session encourages presentations that revisit, revise, or otherwise creatively engage the problematic of the “expat.”

Please send 250-word proposals, a completed session participation proposal form, and a short academic CV to Julie McGee mcgee@udel.edu by 14 August 2017.

Please consult the guidelines at the end of the CAA Call for Participation (http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf) for further details.

EXH: “Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze” @ David Driskell Center, opens March 2nd

The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park is proud to announce its spring exhibition, Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze. The exhibition, organized by the Driskell Center, is curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton, assisted by Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron. The exhibition will be on display at the Driskell Center from Thursday, March 2, 2017 through Friday, May 26, 2017, with an opening reception on Thursday, March 2nd, from 5-7PM.

CFP: African American Open Session @ MAHS Conference 2017

The 2017 Annual Conference of the Midwest Art History Society will be hosted by the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) and Case Western Reserve University from April 6–8. Panels held during the first two days will take place at the museum. The final day of the conference will take place at Oberlin College in the Allen Memorial Art Museum.

Proposals for the African American Art Open Session can be sent to David Hart at  dhart@cia.edu. Proposals of no more than 250 words and a two-page CV should be emailed (preferably as Word documents).

The deadline has been extended to December 31, 2016.

See https://www.mahsonline.org/conference/ for additional details.