JOB: Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor in Brazil

 Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor 

Museum of Contemporary Art of the University of São Paulo, Brazil – in partnership with the University of Campinas (Unicamp), the Federal University of São Paulo (Unifesp), and the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo.

Applications are invited for a Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship for the second semester of 2023 (August to November 2023) at the Museum of Contemporary Art of the University of Sao Paulo (MAC USP) to teach a seminar course on African American art in the Graduate Program in Aesthetics and Art History of the University of Sao Paulo (Master’s and Doctorate levels).

The Museum of Contemporary Art of the University of São Paulo (MAC USP, http://www.mac.usp.br) is a research and education public university museum, with a collection of national and international importance of 20th and 21st centuries art. From the 1,691 works received from the former Museu de Arte Moderna de São Paulo (MAM SP), MAC USP has more recently reached the mark of 10,000 works in its collections. MAC USP’s mission is to promote the study and dissemination of the collection as well as its conservation, protection, restoration, expansion and recognition as a Brazilian artistic heritage in Brazil and abroad. In addition, the Museum seeks to develop teaching, research and extension in the fields of Museology, History, Art Theory and Criticism and Education and Art in Museums, encouraging scientific and cultural exchange with similar institutions in Brazil and abroad and promoting contemporary artistic practice. Its curatorial activities are developed from critical reflection grounded in interdisciplinary research in history, theory and criticism of modern and contemporary art, which also defines its collecting policies. Since 2000, MAC USP is the main University department engaged in the Graduate Program in Aesthetics and Art History (see: http://www.pgeha2.webhostusp.sti.usp.br/index.php/en/). The Program has the academic MA and the PhD diplomas for students who are interested in specializing in it, and has an average of one hundred students a year, under supervision and in its seminar courses.

The Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor is a project MAC USP has undertaken with three other major institutions in the state of São Paulo in Brazil: the University of Campinas (Unicamp) and its Graduate Program in History of Art and Culture; the Federal University of São Paulo (Unifesp) and its Department of Art History; and the Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo (the second largest collection of art of the state of São Paulo).

The successful candidate must hold a doctorate. She/he/they must have:extensive knowledge of African American art with an emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries; a research background and/or research potential as an international authority within the specialty; and a level of international publication at a standard that will contribute to and enhance the profile national and international program of the Graduate Program in Aesthetics and Art History. It is necessary to give lectures, and classes at the graduate level.

The Seminar course is composed of 15 classes of 3 hours each, once a week, which will be taught between the months of August and November 2023. Once selected, the candidate will be asked to closely engage with scholars from the three universities involved who specialize in Brazilian and African diasporic art, and with local collections, to further discuss and develop the syllabus.

For application, send a curriculum vitae and a proposed syllabus on African American art with an emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries [Abstract, topics to be developed and bibliography (10 items)].

The selected candidate will receive a monthly gross salary of $5,000 USD (period August to November 2023). Airfare, accommodation in Brazil and travel insurance will be covered with funds from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

The application starts on Monday, 16 May 2022 and the final deadline is midnight on Monday 15 August 2022. 

Contact Email: cursosmac@usp.br

In your application, please refer to Visiting Professor – Terra Foundation

JOB: Collegiate Assistant Professor of Architectural History @ UChicago

The Humanities Collegiate Division at the University of Chicago is now accepting applications from historians of architecture or the built environment for a four-year, non-renewable, postgraduate appointment as a Collegiate Assistant Professor, who will teach in the Department of Art History. Collegiate Assistant Professors are members of the College Faculty whose primary responsibility is to teach in the Core Curriculum, the College’s general education program.

The position is open to those who will have completed all requirements for their PhD degree no later than August 31, 2022. Candidates must demonstrate excellence in original scholarship as well as in teaching. An ability to incorporate studio teaching into their courses is desirable but not obligatory.

In most years, Collegiate Assistant Professors will teach two undergraduate courses in each of three quarters, distributed across several areas of the Art History Core curriculum. A minimum of two courses per year will be in the team-taught “Introduction to Art and Architecture” (ARTH 10100). The remaining, small seminar-style, courses may include multiple sections of an introductory survey in the Collegiate Assistant Professor’s own field; of an introductory design studio for liberal arts students; or of a thematic discussion-based “Art in Context” course, designed to introduce students to art-historical thinking through a focused examination of a particular set of materials. (For more information about the types of courses offered, see https://arthistory.uchicago.edu/undergraduate/courses)

The Fellow will be a member of the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts (https://societyoffellows.uchicago.edu/). They will be eligible for one quarter of research leave, typically in the third year of residence, and may be eligible to apply for a second research leave in the Spring of the fourth and final year of appointment. The base salary will be determined according to the Collective Bargaining Agreement currently under renegotiation plus a benefits package and an annual professional development allowance of $5,000. For reference, the annual base salary for this rank in academic year 2020-21 was $72,307. Additional benefits, based on eligibility, include a publication allowance and a childcare allowance. The effective date for this appointment is September 1, 2022. This position is governed by a collective bargaining agreement.

Applicants must apply online at http://apply.interfolio.com/105661, and upload the following materials: a letter of application describing teaching and research interests and detailing progress towards the PhD, if not in hand; a current curriculum vitae; a description of the most recent major research project, preferably the dissertation, of not more than 2500 words; a proposal for an “Art in Context” course in the applicant’s field; and the names and contact information of three references whose recommendation letters may be solicited.

Application deadline is May 31, 2022. Only completed applications will be considered.

The position is contingent upon budgetary approval.

The position will be a member of the Service Employees International Union.

For more information about the Department of Art History, please visit arthistory.uchicago.edu. Please contact arthistory@uchicago.edu with any questions about the position.

We seek a diverse pool of applicants who wish to join an academic community that places the highest value on rigorous inquiry and encourages diverse perspectives, experiences, groups of individuals, and ideas to inform and stimulate intellectual challenge, engagement, and exchange. The University’s Statements on Diversity are
at https://provost.uchicago.edu/statements-diversity.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Disabled/Veterans Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national or ethnic origin, age, status as an individual with a disability, protected veteran status, genetic information, or other protected classes under the law. For additional information please see the University’s Notice of Nondiscrimination.

Job seekers in need of a reasonable accommodation to complete the application process should call 773-702-1032 or email equalopportunity@uchicago.edu with their request.

JOB: Assistant/Associate Professor- African American History/ Africana Studies (Tenure Track) @ Rhode Island College

See https://employment.ric.edu/postings/5992 for more details.

JOB: Research Specialist, Race and Daniel Chester French

Opportunity: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Research Specialist

Date: May 2022

Division: Preservation

Department: Historic Sites

Office: Chesterwood

Project Manager: Executive Director

About the Organization

Chesterwood is the former summer home and studio of sculptor Daniel Chester French (1850-1931). Located in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, Chesterwood is a historic site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, an organization that protects significant places representing our diverse cultural experiences. Today, Chesterwood preserves and interprets the work and legacies of French as a significant creator of monumental art.

The Research Specialist project is  funded in full by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Scope of Work

The Research Specialist will research and examine a selection of sculptures from French’s body of work through the perspectives of African Americans and/or Indigenous Americans. A list of over 40 of his works have been identified as complex, problematic and even racist. These works include depictions of individuals considered important to the dominant culture during French’s lifetime who were also enslavers, or politicians who wrote legislation that removed Native peoples from their homelands, for example. Alternatively with other sculptures it is the artist’s representation of Black or Indigenous persons which is problematic. The scholar will explore these pieces through critical frameworks and the Black and/or Indigenous gaze to provide nuance and fresh context for French’s work in contemporary society. This project will provide broadly applicable humanities-based models for examining historical/political monuments and memorials in the fuller contexts of their time.

The Research Specialist is invited to work remotely, but also encouraged to visit Chesterwood to review curatorial files and plaster studies of French’s public sculpture. In addition, the Research Specialist is encouraged to visit Chapin Library, Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts, where Chesterwood’s archival and photographic files are located. The length of the project, from research to deliverables, is one year, anticipating the Research Specialist will be working part-time. 

A small, additional budget for a stipend is available if the Research Specialist chooses to conduct interviews, focus groups, workshops or do oral history research to support this project. 

Deliverables

The outcome of this scholarly and curatorial endeavor will be an online exhibition and catalogue of French’s more problematic public works through the National Trust’s Collections Portal; the research compiled will serve as an educational resource for Chesterwood’s interpretive staff; and lastly, the material will be shared with Chesterwood visitors, offering a full and honest accounting of these important works of sculptural art. Deliverables include:

o A detailed study on the outlined works of art. To be published online with the exhibit.

o Online exhibit introduction text.

o Appropriate “label copy” text, i.e., short synopsis of each work’s complexity and significance. 

Chesterwood staff will be available as a resource to the Research Specialist and handle the creation of the online collection itself. 

The Research Specialist is a NEH-grant funded position of $15,000 for the duration of the project, which is expected to be completed within the course of one calendar year. Dispersal of grant funds will be at predetermined installments by the Executive Director, with the final dispersal upon receipt of all deliverables. 

Qualifications

• Applicants who identify as African American/Black or Indigenous/Native American/American Indian are strongly encouraged to apply.  

• The position is open to independent scholars, tenured and non-tenured professors, and graduate students. 

• Experience researching, writing about, curating exhibitions on, or teachingIndigenous/Native American/American Indian and/or African American history or 

• Applicants should have a demonstrated area of expertise and interest in the areas of monumental sculpture, 19th century sculpture, or public art, and may include those with backgrounds in history, public history, art history, museum studies and curation. 

• A high degree of cultural competency is a necessity, especially when writing or speaking about Black and Indigenous people of color perspectives and when in conversations with members of the Black/African or Indigenous/Native American communities. 

• Must be conversant in topics and issues relevant to Indian Country or US based Black communities today.

• Attending or having a professional or alumni affiliation with a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) or Tribal Colleges and Universities is a plus.

Please send proposal with CV and background materials regarding skills and expertise to Donna Hassler, Executive Director, Chesterwood, at dhassler@chesterwood.org, outlining your interest in participating in this project.  Deadline to submit this information is May 15, 2022.

CFP: Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide (proposals due May 15, 2022)

Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide (NCAW) is pleased to announce the continuation of our series American Art History Digitally supported by a grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art. The editors of NCAW are now accepting proposals for the final digital art history article in the series to be published in spring 2023. To be considered, projects have to focus on art and visual culture of the Americas in the long nineteenth century, from the United States War of Independence to World War I, and must expand on existing histories of art by addressing understudied topics or historically marginalized constituencies while adopting research methods that are inclusive and equitable.

PROPOSALS ARE DUE MAY 15, 2022.

Proposals also should take full advantage of the potential of digital publishing by using digital technologies in the article’s research or publication phase, or both. Strong proposals will demonstrate how the production of digital tool(s) and/or components will lead to a scholarly argument’s key insights (either the tool/component enhanced the depth of insight or made it possible) and/or will illustrate aspects of that argument in dynamic/interactive ways.

NCAW encourages authors to use open source software when possible. While by no means limited to the following, proposals might explore:

  • High resolution imaging or dynamic image presentation (e.g., panoramas, zoom images, visual essays, x-ray or infrared reflectography, moving images, 3D images of art objects, annotated musical scores, annotated digital facsimiles)
  • “Big data” mining and analysis (e.g., social network analysis or text mining using analytics programs like Gephi, Network Workbench)
  • Mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (e.g., depictions of sites, locations of objects, paths of travel, using online mapping tools like MapBox, Timemapper, Neatline)

NCAW is a pioneer in publishing digital art history. For examples of already-completed projects, see the Digital Art History and Digital Humanities page. Authors are not expected to have extensive technical expertise themselves but should be able to articulate how digital research methods and NCAW’s digital publication format connect with their research questions. Upon acceptance of a proposal authors will identify, in discussion with NCAW editors, the digital tools/software to be used. NCAW editors will assist with the development of a timeline and with guidelines for workflow, but authors will be responsible for managing their projects.

To propose a digital art history project, please submit:

  1. Abstract (500 words maximum) as a Microsoft Word document detailing the scholarly content of the article, including how information gleaned from the proposed digital tool will impact the article’s interpretive claims
  2. Abstract (500 words maximum) as a Microsoft Word document outlining the appearance/format of the digital tool(s) and explaining how the author plans to present the article and tool within the NCAW framework (technologies used, layout, etc.). Also provide link(s) from existing digital project(s) that resemble your proposed project functionally, aesthetically, or in the technologies used, followed by several sentences describing which elements of that project will differ from/emulate your proposed digital tool
  3. Budget (1 page maximum)
  4. CV

If interested contributors have an idea for a digital art history project but would like to discuss it with the editors first, we would be happy to talk with you about your ideas in advance of the deadline. Please contact Carey Gibbons, Digital Art History Editor, at dah_editor@19thc- artworldwide.org.

JOB: Intern for Romare Bearden Digital Catalogue Raisonné

The Wildenstein Plattner Institute (WPI) is seeking a research intern to support the Romare Bearden Digital Catalogue Raisonné project. The intern will assist primarily with the compilation of images related to the art and career of the artist Romare Bearden (1911-1988). This is a twelve-week paid summer internship with a time commitment of twenty-eight hours per week, starting June 6th, 2022. 

Responsibilities

The primary assignment will be the task of locating and obtaining high-resolution reproductions of works of art for internal use and future publication. The intern will be responsible for identifying and corresponding with relevant parties to secure permissions. The internship will be conducted as a hybrid of in-person meetings at the WPI office and remote work via Google Meet. Visits to NYC-area research libraries will also be required as necessary.

Qualifications

Graduate-level work in art history, museum studies, or a related field. 

Knowledge about African American art, with emphasis on provenance research and the art market.

Familiarity with Artstor and other primary-source image repositories.

Proficiency with Google Workspace. 

Proficiency with relational computer databases. Intern will be trained on a proprietary database.

Excellent written and verbal communication skills.

Exceptionally detail oriented.

Ability to work independently.

For consideration, applicants should submit a resume with a cover letter and references by Friday, May 20, 2022 to camara.holloway@wpi-art.org.

JOB: Lecturer, Writing About Art @ City College of New York

https://cuny.jobs/new-york-ny/lecturer-writing-about-art/2CD3C7A6C4534FE4AA92293CDD6CAD1C/job/

The Art Department invites applications for the position of Lecturer to teach general education courses in the fields of writing and art history/visual culture. The candidate should be prepared to teach non-majors and BA/BFA students in Art in a variety of writing composition courses, specifically Writing about Art, which is a second-level writing course designed primarily for art majors. Other courses may include freshman-level writing courses covering various topics in the arts and an occasional survey course covering the history of art from a global perspective. Candidates should be savvy with grammar, writing composition, editing, current methodologies, and the field of art history/visual culture. This position is designed to provide full-time faculty leadership in lower division courses.

The Lecturer will be appointed to the Art Department, which is part of the larger division of the Humanities and the Arts within The City College of New York (CCNY). The faculty member is, therefore, expected to participate in departmental and college-wide committees, service, assessment, and leadership. The contractual teaching load is 4-4 with opportunities for administrative course releases. The Art Department serves more than 600 undergraduate art majors and minors, who are concentrating in Studio Art, Art History, Art Education, Photography, or Digital Design. The current Art Department faculty is a dynamic team of professional creative thinkers with a longstanding commitment to teaching and supporting a diverse group of students, many of whom are first-generation immigrants, underserved, and culturally and ethnically diverse populations. CCNY is located in Harlem, and  t he current student population hails from 153 countries, and 99 languages, besides English, are spoken on campus. Approximately 32 percent are Hispanic, 22 percent African American, 22 percent Asian, and 24 percent White. Candidates can learn more about the history, mission, and vision of the college by exploring the school’s website: https://www.ccny.cuny.edu/about/mission

QUALIFICATIONS

A Bachelor’s degree.

Preferred Qualifications:

Preference will be given to candidates with a MA or PhD in Art History, Art Criticism, Visual Culture, or a related field. The candidate must also have a genuine interest in teaching undergraduate students and a minimum of two years of experience teaching college-level courses in arts-based writing and/or art history at the freshman and sophomore levels. Familiarity with the basic research methods of art history and available resources in the field is required. The successful candidate will be an outstanding educator with a teaching record that demonstrates a familiarity with inclusive pedagogy, the use of interactive and participatory teaching methods, and a sensitivity to and understanding of the socio-economic, cultural, and ethnic diversity within the classroom. Experience working with multilingual students for whom English is not their primary language, first-generation college students, and students with physical and/or learning disabilities is a plus, as these factors relate to differences in learning styles. Experience working as a tutor or an editor would also be helpful. The candidate should have a strong knowledge of grammar and composition, art history, and be interested in developing creative teaching strategies for students in the first two years of college. In addition, candidates should be able to use teaching resources, such as Blackboard, Zoom, and other types of programs, as well as have knowledge of contemporary practices in art and design.

COMPENSATION

CUNY offers faculty a competitive compensation and benefits package covering health insurance, pension and retirement benefits, paid parental leave, and savings programs. We also provide mentoring and support for research, scholarship, and publication as part of our commitment to ongoing faculty professional development.

HOW TO APPLY

Only applications submitted through CUNYfirst will be considered for this position.

If you are viewing this job posting in CUNYfirst, please click on “Apply Now” on the bottom of this page and follow the instructions.

If you are viewing this job posting externally, please apply as follows:

  • Go to http://www.cuny.edu and click on “Employment”
  • Click “Search job listings”
  • Click on “More options to search for CUNY jobs”
  • Search for Job Opening ID number 24123
  • Click on the “Apply Now” button and follow the instructions.

Applications, including the following must be uploaded to the CUNYfirst job application website as a single PDF document:

(1) Cover Letter

(2) Curriculum Vitae

(3) Statement of teaching Philosophy that speaks to the candidates approach to inclusive teaching strategies for diverse student populations

(4) Names and contact information for three professional references

(5) Two sample syllabi

(6) An academic art-historical writing sample (4-6 pages including notes and bibliography)

CLOSING DATE

Open until filled, with review of applications to begin April 20, 2022.

JOB SEARCH CATEGORY

CUNY Job Posting: Faculty

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

CUNY encourages people with disabilities, minorities, veterans and women to apply. At CUNY, Italian Americans are also included among our protected groups. Applicants and employees will not be discriminated against on the basis of any legally protected category, including sexual orientation or gender identity. EEO/AA/Vet/Disability Employer.

Call for Papers: 2022 Photography Network Symposium — apply by June 15

Intersecting Photographies

Photography Network’s 2022 Symposium, October 13-15 

The second symposium of the Photography Network will be hosted jointly by Photography Network and Howard University in Washington, DC. Depending on circumstances, the event will either be hybrid (in-person and virtual) or fully virtual. We will update speakers and attendees by August 15.

The 2022 symposium theme is “Intersecting Photographies.” Scholarship in the history of photography has until recently focused predominantly on its technical capabilities, patronage, and modes of representation. This focus elides the longer histories of colonialism and imperialism that the medium fosters­—and in which it can potentially intervene. Recent scholarship—including Ariella Azoulay’s “Unlearning the Origins of Photography” (2018), Mark Sealy’s Decolonising the Camera: Photography in Racial Time (2019), and Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie’s (Seminole, Muscogee, Diné) “When is a Photograph Worth a Thousand Words?” (1998)—are among many projects reconceptualizing photography as a site of encounter and exchange, fraught with historical inequities brought by colonizing desires.

The symposium contributes to art history’s ongoing interrogation of photography as a colonizing technology, as well as the exploration of the medium’s ability to promote social justice. “Intersecting Photographies” supports thinkers active in disentangling these histories by foregrounding three kinds of intersections: 1) those between peoples (intersubjective or intercultural); 2) those between photography and other media (intermedial); and 3) photographs, photographers, or photographic subjects that foreground multi-layered representations of social groups and self-fashioning, following Kimberlé Crenshaw’s conceptualization of identity’s “intersectionality.” 

Proposals drawing on these interwoven spheres of concern could consider subjects such as:

·      Methodological questions regarding authority to speak on challenging photographs and themes

·      Social formations and power relationships in the “photographic encounter” and contexts of display

·      Displaying history, colonization, and legacies of imperialism in museums and other institutions

·      The application of decolonization studies and/or digital humanities to archival holdings

·      The archive as a critical site of intersectionality 

·      Intercultural albums as documents and objects of self-fashioning 

Photography Network invites proposals for presentations that broach these and other subjects pertinent to “Intersecting Photographies.” We welcome proposals across disciplines and encourage a broad range of subjects that reflect the geographical diversity of the field. Practitioners and scholars at any stage of their career are welcome to submit their research. We also welcome international scholars but note that the conference will be in English. The symposium organizers are also interested in attracting a range of presentational styles. In addition to proposals for individual, 20-minute papers, we also seek alternative-format presentations (e.g., workshops and roundtables). To encourage variety, applicants may submit up to 2 proposals, provided that one is in an alternative format. We will also host a Pecha Kucha for new research on any topic from students, curators, academics, and practitioners. If you would like to be considered for the Pecha Kucha, please note so in your email submission. You are welcome to apply only to the Pecha Kucha. Conference sessions will be organized around accepted submissions, rather than prescribed themes. 

Please send: (1) a 250-word abstract, (2) a clear indication of preferred format, and (3) a three-page resume or CV by June 15 to the Photography Network Symposium organizing committee: Monica Bravo (University of Southern California), Melanee Harvey (Howard University),Caroline Riley (University of California, Davis), Leslie Ureña (National Portrait Gallery), and Andrés Zervigón (Rutgers University), at photographynetworksymposium@gmail.com. To be considered only for the Pecha Kucha, please email us a 100-word abstract and a short, three-page resume or CV. Notifications of accepted proposals will be sent by email by July 19. The symposium will be held October 13, 14, and 15, 2022. The schedule will be announced by August 1 and will be determined after reviewing the abstracts and finalizing the conference format. Final papers from speakers are required by September 15.

 It is our hope that “Intersecting Photographies” will be live-streamed for those unable to attend because of geographic, financial, or other logistical barriers. ASL interpretation and enabling closed captioning for the live stream will make the symposium further available for those with language barriers.

Note: All are welcome to apply. Accepted presenters must be Photography Network members in good standing at the time of the symposium. Annual membership is $20 (student/unaffiliated), $40 (Affiliated), or $100 (Sustaining Member). Please visit Photography Network’s website (https://www.photographynetwork.net/memberregistration) for more information on how to join. 

Call for New Sessions SECAC 2022 in Baltimore–Deadline Apr. 14, 2022

The Call for New Sessions for SECAC 2022 in Baltimore is open through Thursday, April 14 at https://secac.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/18/home.

Now that we are reviewing the roster of sessions that were originally scheduled for 2021, we would like to invite proposals for newly conceived sessions. We are especially interested in new ideas, themes, and approaches, and in combined art history and studio art sessions, where appropriate. This call for new session proposals will be followed by a corresponding (and final) call for papers. 

Link to abstracts of sessions advanced from 2021:  https://secac.secure-platform.com/a/page/sessions


Conference Dates: October 26 – 29, 2022
Venue: Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
Conference Director: Kerr Houston
Contact: secac2022@mica.edu
Call for Sessions: March 22 – April 14, 2022
Website: https://secacart.org/page/Baltimore

The Maryland Institute College of Art is excited to act as the institutional host for the 78th annual meeting of SECAC in Baltimore, MD, from October 26-29, 2022. Based at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel and informed by the theme Watershed, the conference seeks to foster thoughtful analyses of the myriad intersections between art, art history, education, and social and environmental justice. To that end, more than 130 individual sessions will be supplemented by a keynote address by the artist, educator and 2016 MacArthur fellow Joyce Scott, and by three optional walking tours led by local architectural historians, artists and activists. The conference will also include a show of work by the 2021 Artist’s Fellowship winner Brianna Harlan and an exhibition of work by SECAC members, juried by the artist and curator Jeffrey Kent Attendees will have the chance, too, to explore Baltimore’s rich artistic landscape, from The Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art to the American Visionary Art Museum, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, and a vibrant local gallery scene. The conference hotel is within convenient walking distance of Baltimore’s celebrated Inner Harbor, as well as a number of nearby restaurants, historical sites, and attractions. MICA looks forward to welcoming you to Charm City!

If you wish to stop receiving email from us, you can simply remove yourself by visiting: http://secacart.org/members/EmailOptPreferences.aspx?id=55025866&e=keri.watson@ucf.edu&h=47c2f92155d7b436c1cc8d397a57a08239262053

SECAC
PO Box 9773
Wilmington, DE 19809-9773

JOB: Head, Research and Scholars Center, Smithsonian American Art Museum

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is now accepting applications for the Head of the Research and Scholars Center in Washington, DC. This is an outstanding senior leadership role, overseeing a team responsible for the fellowships and internships programs, archives and special collections, research and collections databases, and the museum’s peer-reviewed journal, American Art.

Permanent, Federal GS-15 position in Washington, DC, salary range from $148,484-$176,300/year. Apply by April 6. Telework possible, but not fully remote.

General U.S. citizen applicants (DEU): https://usajobs.gov/job/643252500
Merit Promotion Authority (MPA) applicants only: https://usajobs.gov/job/643249900

Qualifications: You qualify for this position if you have one year of specialized experience equivalent to at least the GS-14 level in the Federal Service or comparable pay band system. For this position, Specialized experience is defined as experience in program management, administration, and staff supervision; strategic planning skills; art history and visual culture, particularly American art; interests and needs of scholars and researchers of American art and related fields; principles and practices of information management; developing computer databases; archival standards and procedures for special collections; professional associations and resources within the visual resource, information management and archival fields; and writing and editing.

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