CFP: CAA 2018/Los Angeles panel–The Photograph, Self-Representation & US Contemporary Art

Alternative Visions: The Photograph, Self-Representation, and Fact in Contemporary Art of the United States 

Chair(s): Natalie Zelt, The University of Texas at Austin, nzelt@utexas.edu
As the editors of “Aperture” recently reminded their readers, “The need for artists to offer persuasive, alternative visions is more urgent than ever.”
In response to that need for creative dissent, this panel investigates the ways contemporary artists use the photograph and self-representation together to craft alternative visions and selves. The photograph’s tangled relationship to truth and identity make it a potent conceptual and compositional tool for artists to challenge the limits of both art historical and social categories. Designed to delineate and define, the photograph continues to circumscribe the visual limits of identity categories, including nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality, well after art historians and cultural critics such as Allan Sekula, Martha Rosler, Sally Stein, and John Tagg called its documentary “truthiness” into question. Additionally, a swell of “post-photography” discourses, ranging from Geoffrey Batchen to Robert Shore, confound the boundaries of the medium, while curators and museums struggle to adapt.
“Alternative Visions” examines the many ways contemporary artists in the United States disrupt the photograph’s master narratives and traditional roles to create subversive, subjective, and contradictory representations of themselves that resist prevailing visual modes.
Presentations will consider an array of questions including: What is the relationship between the photograph and the self in a “post-identity,” “postfact,” and “post-photography” environment? What methods of dissent are evidenced in self-centered photographic practice and what might be their limits? In a contemporary cultural landscape untethered from conventional arbiters of fact, what spaces of resistance can artworks that deploy the photograph create?
For more on the College Art Association conference, go to CAA News Today.
Advertisements

2017 Terra Publication Grant Applications due Sept. 15

Letters of Inquiry for Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grants are due September 15.

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant supports book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that are under contract with a publisher. For this grant program, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States. Awards of up to $15,000 will be made in three distinct categories:

  • Grants to US publishers for manuscripts considering American art in an international context
  • Grants to non-US publishers for manuscripts on topics in American art
  • Grants for the translation of books on topics in American art to or from English.

Applicants must submit a letter of inquiry by September 15, 2017. The deadline for the receipt of completed applications is December 15, 2017.

For more information, please visit the College Art Association website, where you will find application guidelines and the application process, schedule, and checklist, or contact CAA Editorial Manager Sarah Zabrodski at szabrodski@collegeart.org or +1 212-392-4424.
Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 501914–15. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61

TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART

120 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611 USA   +1 312 664 3939
121 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France   +33 1 43 20 67 01

 

CFP ASWAD Biennial: panel/proposal submissions: Mar. 3, 2017 deadline

 
Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora
 9th Biennial Conference 
Hosted by Pablo de Olavide University
Seville, Spain
 
African/Diasporic Futures: Re-Envisioning Power, Interventions, Imaginations and Belonging

November 7-11, 2017 Seville, Spain

Deadline for Submission: Friday, March 3, 2017
In 2015 the United Nations launched the Decade for the People of African Descent to acknowledge descendants of the African Diaspora as a distinct group whose human dignities and rights have been violated throughout the globe. The Decade for the People of African Descent is a sustained global commitment to recognize, protect, and bring about inclusive social justice to members of the African Diaspora. Contemporarily, Europe is an epicenter of such urgent grappling with systematic and long-term social inequities. Politics and policies of racialized exclusion, particularly through its engagement with Africans and people of African descent, re-center Europe’s non-neutral racial projects in their nation building.

The protection and promotion of human rights has gained greater significance and urgency with the crisis of African migration, and other forced and semi-forced migrations from Western Asia and Eastern Europe. As these individuals and groups have sought refuge and equitable and humane social participation within European societies, they have challenged conceptualizations of the state and citizenship formation, and continue to force new articulations and notions of “home” and belonging. These current migratory flows are newer iterations of a long relationship between Europe and Africa, and between Europe and the African Diaspora that spans centuries.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 9th biennial conference to be held in Seville, Spain, November 7 to 11, 2017 on the campus of Pablo de Olavide University to discuss, examine, and reflect on the critical nature of the interactions and transformations that African descendants experience in their diaspora, particularly within a European context. As an interdisciplinary organization, ASWAD invites presentations that illuminate the lives of Africans and African descendants from scholars of any discipline, including social sciences, physical sciences, life sciences and performing arts.  We aim to collaborate with activist and intellectual communities around sustained dialogue involving diaspora, race and citizenship, and historical and contemporary patterns of racial formation.

In addition to academics, ASWAD welcomes artists, activists, journalists, and independent scholars with specific interests in the African Diaspora. We are especially keen to create a platform for Black European Groups and NGOs.

We encourage proposals that align with the conference theme. Suggested panel themes include, but are not limited to the following:
a.         The African Diaspora, Modern States and (Re)Conceptions of Citizenship
b.         Humanitarianism and Human Rights in the Global African Diaspora
c.         Black Lives Matter Across the Globe
d.         The African Diaspora, Economics and Immigration to/in Europe

e.         Religion, Power, and Praxis in the African Diaspora

f.          African Diaspora and the Arts and Activism in Europe
g.         Spain and the African Diaspora
h.         Writing and Translating the African Diaspora and Black Identities in Europe
i.          The United Nation’s Decade for People of African Descent
j.          Music and the Performing Arts in Africa and the African Diaspora
k.         Pedagogy, Higher Education and Activism
l.          Black LGBTQIA Social Constructs
m.        Labor and Organizing in Local and International Contexts
n.         Activism and New Technologies and Media
o.         African Diasporic Futures: Challenges and Opportunities
p.        Future Makings: Collective re-imaginations through migration
q.        Reimagining social spaces and collective identities
The city of Seville is a UNESCO world heritage site and former medieval capital of Euro-African kingdoms, both Muslim and Christian, and later head of Spain’s early modern world empire. The city is a nexus of African Diaspora history, with a living heritage of connecting Europe, America and Africa. Pablo de Olavide University, ASWAD‘s 2017 conference host, has a demonstrated commitment to international cooperation and social justice.

CFP: Special Latino Art issue of the Archives of American Art Journal

Call for essay proposals closes March 1

The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art is planning an issue of the Archives of American Art Journal devoted to Latino art. This special issue will offer a valuable opportunity for scholars and artists to increase the visibility of Latino studies in the field of American art history as well as enrich the study of Latino art with primary sources at the Archives of American Art. While the Archives has been collecting the papers of Latino artists for decades, the focused collecting initiative that it launched in 2015 has resulted in the acquisition of many important new collections, which include the personal papers of artists, gallery and organization records, and oral history interviews. You can explore the Archives’ Latino art research collections online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

Essays selected for publication in the journal will offer new approaches to Latino art and artists by thinking in innovative ways about primary sources in the Archives of American Art. Authors must identify the specific collections that will inform their research. Please include the following in a single MS Word document and email it to Tanya Sheehan, editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, SheehanT@si.edu, by March 1, 2017:

* Author name and contact information

* Proposed manuscript title and abstract of no more than 250 words

The journal’s editorial team will review the proposals and then invite select authors to prepare a manuscript of 5,000-7,000 words (including endnotes) for double-blind peer review. Complete manuscripts for review will be due by July 1, 2017. Essays must be previously unpublished and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Archives of American Art Journal is the longest-running scholarly journal devoted to the history of American art. It aims to showcase new approaches to and out-of-the-box thinking about primary sources. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press, the journal contains both peer-reviewed research and commissioned articles based in part on the vast holdings of the Archives.

Information on manuscript submissions and review criteria is available on the journal’s webpage, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/aaa.

CFP: “America Is (Still) Hard to See: New Directions in American Art History,” Association of Historians of American Art (AHAA) session at College Art Association conference, Feb. 21-24, 2018 (Los Angeles, CA)

The 2015 inaugural exhibition of the new Whitney Museum of American Art, America Is Hard to See, charted a largely unconventional history of modern American art built around issues that have galvanized United States artists, pressing them into often uncomfortable relationships with challenging political and social contexts, including the history of slavery, labor unrest and the Vietnam War–and effectively underscoring the point that American is hard to see.

In recent years, scores of museum exhibitions, books and catalogues have worked to reimagine the field among these lines, telling the history of United States art in all of its multilayered, messy complexity. It is not common to find major shows of previously suppressed African-American and Latinx artists as well as scholarly studies of forgotten women and LGBTQ artists. Yet in an era of unprecedented economic inequality, Black Lives Matter, the rise of the alternative right, and anti-immigration reform, there remains much to be done.

This panel seeks to address where American art history from colonial times to the present sits in our twenty-first century classrooms, galleries, museums, blogs and journals–and, more importantly, what directions we might pursue for its future growth. We welcome papers representing all historical periods in American art as well as new avenues of research and methodological inquiry.

Please send a one-page abstract and short c.v. by March 15, 2017, to sessions@ahaaonline.org

AHAA seeks to included new voices, and we encourage younger scholars to make submissions. Chairs and panelists of AHAA-sponsored sessions must be current members of AHAA and CAA.

Opportunity for Historians of 19th and early 20th-century African American Architecture and Material Culture and Louisiana History and Culture

Betty Reid Soskin is the granddaughter of Louis Charbonnet (1869-1924), architect and builder of Corpus Christi Church and School in New Orleans.  Ms. Soskin has information and memorabilia about her grandfather that she would like to share with reputable researchers of 19th and early 20th-century African American architecture and material culture, and/or Louisiana history and culture.

Initially, a creator of ornamental iron work, Louis Charbonnet became an engineer, inventor and millwright.  His New Orleans business establishment dates to 1893.  After St. Louis School was destroyed in a 1915 storm, Charbonnet drew plans for its reconstruction and supervised the project.

To learn more, contact Ms. Soskin cbreaux@earthlink.net

Also see Betty Reid Soskin’s blog!

louischarbonnetsr

Photo of Louis Charbonnet Sr. at “The Charbonnets” homepage

CFP: Art of the Latinx Diaspora @ Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies (JOLLAS)

CFP: Art of the Latinx Diaspora

Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies, University of Nebraska at Omaha, 2018

The Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies (JOLLAS) seeks contributions for a special issue on the Art of the Latinx Diaspora. All media, periods and geographies are eligible, and contributors are encouraged to think broadly and innovatively about the ways in which the Latinx diaspora and its cultural production are framed. Scholarship from all art-related disciplines, including Art History, Curatorial Studies, Art Education, etc. is welcome. Technical and quantitative methodologies are invited.

Interested parties are asked to submit a full draft manuscript (10-20 pages in length, notes and images included), in MSWord compatible and PDF format to arduran[at]unomaha.edu by 15 March 2017. Submissions will be peer-reviewed.

For more information, please visit:
http://jollas.org
http://www.unomaha.edu/college-of-arts-and-sciences/ollas/index.php

About JOLLAS:
The Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies (JOLLAS) is an interdisciplinary, international, and peer reviewed on-line journal housed at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. The journal seeks to be reflective of the shifting demographics, geographic dispersion, and new community formations occurring among Latino populations across borders and throughout the Americas. The journal emphasizes the collective understanding of Latino issues in the U.S. while recognizing the growing importance of transnationalism and the porous borders of Latino/Latin American identities.
The Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies welcomes quality scholarship from relevant academic disciplines as well as from practitioners in the private and public sectors. JOLLAS is receptive to scholarship coming from a variety of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. All research should be understood and examined from a transnational perspective.

JOLLAS’ Mission:
To publish academically rigorous scholarship with real-world applicability to the understanding of Latino/Latin American peoples and critical issues.

All inquiries should be directed to Adrian R. Duran, Associate Professor, Art & Art History, University of Nebraska at Omaha, arduran@unomaha.edu

CFP: Terra Foundation Int’l Research Travel Grants for US-based Scholars

Terra Foundation International Research Travel Grants offer US-based scholars working on American art and visual culture prior to 1980 the opportunity to conduct research outside the United States. Grant funding is available for short-term travel for scholars whose research projects require study of materials outside the United States, enabling scholars to:

  • Discover new primary source material;
  • Experience works of art first-hand in museums and private collections;
  • Make contact with artists, critics, art dealers, archivists, curators, and university scholars;
  • Consult archives and library collections outside the US;
  • Establish professional networks for future research.

Applications are due Jan. 15, 2017.
Grants will be awarded to doctoral students as well as postdoctoral and senior scholars.

For more information, go to the Terra Foundation’s website.

Call for Papers: The Missing Chapter conference at the National Portrait Gallery/London, October 21, 2016

Call for papers: deadline Friday, July 22, 2016.

22_NPG_Black_ChroniclesBlack Chronicles at the National Portrait Gallery. Installation photo: Zoe Maxwell at Autograph-apb.co.uk 

Call for Research

From Art Historian and Critic Judith Wilson-Paes:

Somebody needs to research a book/ organize an exhibition on the West’s black community photographers–i.e., Oakland’s E.F. Joseph, San Francisco’s David Johnson, and the two LA women photojournalists who are in Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe’s book on black women photographers.

These California photographers are our Van Der Zees and W.S. Robertses in the western US. And as Joy Byrd’s Facebook post makes clear, they documented a little-known chapter of African American history–the flowering of 20th-c. West Coast black communities.