CFP: Contribute to an Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture (proposals due Sept. 14, 2018)

Calls for Contributors: Book Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture

Deadline: September 14, 2018

 

The recent rise in problems of immigration and race are of long historical standing.  During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe, increased colonial expansion, industrialization, economic inequality, and nationalism severely tested the assumptions of a shared social fabric. In this, the visual arts performed a key function by amplifying or mitigating racial and ethnic difference. We are seeking proposals for essays that explore representations of race and folk within the context of the disciplines of ethnography and anthropology. The focus of the book will be to examine art’s role in forming social constructions about the interactions between white majority populations with minorities that are indigenous, migratory or nomadic, or relocated through colonization. Proposals are encouraged which look at understudied countries and challenge traditional assumptions, such as perceived homogenous populations (Scandinavia, for example) or those with diverse and shifting multi-ethnic groups, as in Central Europe and Russia. Of particular interest are topics that consider ambiguities and contradict assumptions of uniform binary relations: East-West fusions within racial origins, interracial marriages, fluctuating borders, and migratory populations.  One might consider the fact that the folk were valorized in definitions of national identity simultaneously with the marginalization of indigenous people through racist characterizations and ethnic categorizations.  So too, admiration for the primitive and the popularity of “exotic” people as entertainment co-existed with their denigration.

Proposals are welcome that apply themes from critical race theories, such as the definition of racial identity through social construction, evidence of microaggressions, and practices of essentializing ethnic groups rather than individuals.  How did countries that viewed themselves as progressive and inclusive deal with evidence that contradicted this?  In what ways did multi-ethnic regions foster a common culture while at the same time practicing biological or cultural racism? How did migratory folk populations disrupt conventional definitions of ethnic identity, which were based in part on geography? Proposals are also welcome that consider continuing echoes of these issues later in the twentieth-century; that look at ways in which marginalized minority groups used culture as a means to empower and define themselves; or that focus on the construction of white racial identity.

Proposals should be approximately 300 words and are due by September 14.

Send proposals and c.v. to: Marsha Morton, mortonmarsha10@gmail.com and Barbara Larson, blarson@uwf.edu

 

 

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CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture”

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture.” Accepted papers will appear in a guest-edited section of Panorama issue 5.1 (May 2019).

Amateurism, as both a praxis and an attitude, has been a fundamental concept for the development and reception of American art. In the Colonial period, for instance, trained painters and self-taught limners alike were measured against Europe’s professional portraitists, and producers of decorative arts were often viewed as craftspeople or artisans rather than fine artists. And during the nineteenth century itinerant painters and so-called “folk artists” established careers that had little in common with those of artists now recognized as American masters, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church. At the same time, however, Americans (Benjamin Franklin, for example) have long admired the “Yankee ingenuity” and “useful knowledge” of self-starters and laypeople.

In the twentieth century amateurism emerged as an invaluable foil for American modernists: Robert Henri encouraged the painting of what one knows rather than what one learns; the regionalist artists disavowed the theoretical expertise of the Stieglitz Circle artists and writers; and the junk stylings of some Neo-Dadaists were complemented by their slapdash techniques and a casual disregard for “high art.” Snapshots, home movies, and hobby art are more obvious, though historically far less visible, examples of artforms that have been classified as amateur, and today, of course, DIY productions, both digital and analog, abound, and everyone with a smartphone is an accidental curator.

The various historical and contemporary categorizations of Native American visual culture are especially relevant to these themes. We know, for instance, that Abstract Expressionists borrowed from supposedly “primitive” artforms to heighten the aura of untutored amateurism around their works. But we also know that appropriation is just one context, and a flawed one at that, for analyzing Native American art, which for better and for worse, often finds itself at the crossroads of the vernacular and the institutional. And, of course, Native American artists have negotiated amateur and professional identities for their own purposes, in order to advance sovereignty, for example, or to participate in markets not entirely their own.

Refreshingly, scholars, curators, and publishers have begun to examine the art and visual culture of amateurism in recent years: there is the enduring appeal of the photographic snapshot and accompanying “snapshot aesthetic,” recent books and articles on amateur film, successful folk art exhibitions, and the National Gallery of Art’s current exhibition Outliers and American Vanguard Art. Nevertheless, the significance of the amateur-professional dialectic to American art requires more critical attention, and, at a time when the arts and humanities are subjected to more and more evaluative measures, the insouciance of amateur art seems more and more urgent.

Panorama seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words that take innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of amateur art and its material, historical, theoretical terrain. We encourage authors to consider the unique advantages of the journal’s online platform, which permits various digital enhancements, such as high-resolution images with zoom capabilities, the embedding of moving images and films, interactive maps, and the reconstruction of historical exhibitions, to name a few possibilities.

To propose a paper, please send a 500-word abstract and curriculum vitae to Justin Wolff: justin.wolff@maine.edu.

Deadline for proposals: May 15, 2018

Deadline for papers: December 31, 2018

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Papers: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama is a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to American art and visual culture in all media, from the colonial period to the present day. The journal provides a high-caliber international forum for disseminating original research and scholarship and for sustaining a lively engagement with intellectual developments and methodological debates in art history, visual and material cultural studies, museums, and curatorial work. It encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework and seeks to acknowledge in full work by African American, Asian American, Latinx, and Native American artists, makers, curators, art historians, and others engaged in visual cultural production in the United States.

Panorama welcomes submissions that utilize the insights of both traditional and new historical and interpretive approaches to art in the US in both local and global contexts. The editors seek submissions in various formats, including feature length articles (7,000-10,000 words), research notes (maximum of 2,500 words), book and exhibition reviews, and “Bully Pulpit” suggestions–texts that trace a conversation or debate on a topic that is of general interest to the field.

For more information, see: http://journalpanorama.org/submissions/

RFP: Seeking author for Kara Walker essay

Drs. Deborah Johnson and Wendy Oliver, editors of Women Making Art, Women in the Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts since 1960, are searching for additional authors for an updated second edition of the volume. Specifically, we are looking for a scholar interested in contributing a chapter on Kara Walker.

The essay should be roughly 6,000-8,000 words, notes and references included, with a focus on one paradigmatic image (or series) within Walker’s work. The author should be prepared to engage formal analysis, race and gender theory, and biography.

If interested — or with questions — please contact doctorj@providence.edu

CFP Craft Studies Symposium–abstracts due Mar. 1, 2018

Call for Papers

Shared Ground: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to Craft Studies

Presented by the Center for Craft, Bard Graduate Center, and the Museum of Arts and Design

September 20-22, 2018

New York, New York

Deadline: March 1, 2018

Click here to apply

Bard Graduate Center, the Center for Craft, and the Museum of Arts and Design are pleased to issue a call for papers for the forthcoming Shared Ground: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to Craft Studies symposium to be held in New York City September 20-22, 2018.

The “material-turn” in the humanities has brought increased attention to the study of craft in art and design history, decorative arts and material culture studies, as well as other disciplines, such as anthropology and science and technology studies. Institutions are combining academic traditions of the humanities and social sciences with “learning by doing” pedagogy and the influence of global studies has led scholars to research, understand, and contextualize craft outside of the studio craft or the arts and craft movements. Beyond the humanities and social sciences, fields ranging from architecture and urban planning to engineering and computer science have begun to explore the craft-like nature and implications of their research and professional practice.

Craft studies is at a critical moment as more disciplines turn their research towards craft and more scholars expand the geographic and temporal boundaries of the field. The 2018 Shared Ground symposium will explore cross-disciplinary approaches to craft studies, with an eye towards intersecting and divergent theories, methodologies, and approaches in this emerging area of study.

DETAILS

Abstracts (up to 250 words) for 20 min papers and a brief curriculum vitae must be submitted here on or before March 1, 2018 at 11:59pm EST. We are looking for interdisciplinary knowledge and welcome papers from all disciplines. Alternative presentation formats are welcome, and graduate students are encouraged to apply. Abstracts will be subject to peer review.

For additional information, please visit www.cccdnow.org/sharedground or contact Marilyn Zapf, Assistant Director and Curator, the Center for Craft at mzapf@craftcreativitydesign.org

Library travel grants for Latin American Studies research — apply by Feb. 16, 2018

The Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Florida is offering library access grants for spring and summer 2018 for scholars from qualified U.S. colleges and universities to use the extensive resources of the Latin American and Caribbean Collection (www.uflib.ufl.edu/lac). The application deadline is February 16, 2018. [All travel must be completed by […]

via University of Florida: Library Travel Research Grants — Repeating Islands

CFP: CAA 2018/Los Angeles panel–The Photograph, Self-Representation & US Contemporary Art

Alternative Visions: The Photograph, Self-Representation, and Fact in Contemporary Art of the United States 

Chair(s): Natalie Zelt, The University of Texas at Austin, nzelt@utexas.edu
As the editors of “Aperture” recently reminded their readers, “The need for artists to offer persuasive, alternative visions is more urgent than ever.”
In response to that need for creative dissent, this panel investigates the ways contemporary artists use the photograph and self-representation together to craft alternative visions and selves. The photograph’s tangled relationship to truth and identity make it a potent conceptual and compositional tool for artists to challenge the limits of both art historical and social categories. Designed to delineate and define, the photograph continues to circumscribe the visual limits of identity categories, including nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality, well after art historians and cultural critics such as Allan Sekula, Martha Rosler, Sally Stein, and John Tagg called its documentary “truthiness” into question. Additionally, a swell of “post-photography” discourses, ranging from Geoffrey Batchen to Robert Shore, confound the boundaries of the medium, while curators and museums struggle to adapt.
“Alternative Visions” examines the many ways contemporary artists in the United States disrupt the photograph’s master narratives and traditional roles to create subversive, subjective, and contradictory representations of themselves that resist prevailing visual modes.
Presentations will consider an array of questions including: What is the relationship between the photograph and the self in a “post-identity,” “postfact,” and “post-photography” environment? What methods of dissent are evidenced in self-centered photographic practice and what might be their limits? In a contemporary cultural landscape untethered from conventional arbiters of fact, what spaces of resistance can artworks that deploy the photograph create?
For more on the College Art Association conference, go to CAA News Today.

2017 Terra Publication Grant Applications due Sept. 15

Letters of Inquiry for Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grants are due September 15.

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant supports book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that are under contract with a publisher. For this grant program, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States. Awards of up to $15,000 will be made in three distinct categories:

  • Grants to US publishers for manuscripts considering American art in an international context
  • Grants to non-US publishers for manuscripts on topics in American art
  • Grants for the translation of books on topics in American art to or from English.

Applicants must submit a letter of inquiry by September 15, 2017. The deadline for the receipt of completed applications is December 15, 2017.

For more information, please visit the College Art Association website, where you will find application guidelines and the application process, schedule, and checklist, or contact CAA Editorial Manager Sarah Zabrodski at szabrodski@collegeart.org or +1 212-392-4424.
Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 501914–15. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61

TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART

120 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611 USA   +1 312 664 3939
121 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France   +33 1 43 20 67 01

 

CFP ASWAD Biennial: panel/proposal submissions: Mar. 3, 2017 deadline

 
Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora
 9th Biennial Conference 
Hosted by Pablo de Olavide University
Seville, Spain
 
African/Diasporic Futures: Re-Envisioning Power, Interventions, Imaginations and Belonging

November 7-11, 2017 Seville, Spain

Deadline for Submission: Friday, March 3, 2017
In 2015 the United Nations launched the Decade for the People of African Descent to acknowledge descendants of the African Diaspora as a distinct group whose human dignities and rights have been violated throughout the globe. The Decade for the People of African Descent is a sustained global commitment to recognize, protect, and bring about inclusive social justice to members of the African Diaspora. Contemporarily, Europe is an epicenter of such urgent grappling with systematic and long-term social inequities. Politics and policies of racialized exclusion, particularly through its engagement with Africans and people of African descent, re-center Europe’s non-neutral racial projects in their nation building.

The protection and promotion of human rights has gained greater significance and urgency with the crisis of African migration, and other forced and semi-forced migrations from Western Asia and Eastern Europe. As these individuals and groups have sought refuge and equitable and humane social participation within European societies, they have challenged conceptualizations of the state and citizenship formation, and continue to force new articulations and notions of “home” and belonging. These current migratory flows are newer iterations of a long relationship between Europe and Africa, and between Europe and the African Diaspora that spans centuries.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 9th biennial conference to be held in Seville, Spain, November 7 to 11, 2017 on the campus of Pablo de Olavide University to discuss, examine, and reflect on the critical nature of the interactions and transformations that African descendants experience in their diaspora, particularly within a European context. As an interdisciplinary organization, ASWAD invites presentations that illuminate the lives of Africans and African descendants from scholars of any discipline, including social sciences, physical sciences, life sciences and performing arts.  We aim to collaborate with activist and intellectual communities around sustained dialogue involving diaspora, race and citizenship, and historical and contemporary patterns of racial formation.

In addition to academics, ASWAD welcomes artists, activists, journalists, and independent scholars with specific interests in the African Diaspora. We are especially keen to create a platform for Black European Groups and NGOs.

We encourage proposals that align with the conference theme. Suggested panel themes include, but are not limited to the following:
a.         The African Diaspora, Modern States and (Re)Conceptions of Citizenship
b.         Humanitarianism and Human Rights in the Global African Diaspora
c.         Black Lives Matter Across the Globe
d.         The African Diaspora, Economics and Immigration to/in Europe

e.         Religion, Power, and Praxis in the African Diaspora

f.          African Diaspora and the Arts and Activism in Europe
g.         Spain and the African Diaspora
h.         Writing and Translating the African Diaspora and Black Identities in Europe
i.          The United Nation’s Decade for People of African Descent
j.          Music and the Performing Arts in Africa and the African Diaspora
k.         Pedagogy, Higher Education and Activism
l.          Black LGBTQIA Social Constructs
m.        Labor and Organizing in Local and International Contexts
n.         Activism and New Technologies and Media
o.         African Diasporic Futures: Challenges and Opportunities
p.        Future Makings: Collective re-imaginations through migration
q.        Reimagining social spaces and collective identities
The city of Seville is a UNESCO world heritage site and former medieval capital of Euro-African kingdoms, both Muslim and Christian, and later head of Spain’s early modern world empire. The city is a nexus of African Diaspora history, with a living heritage of connecting Europe, America and Africa. Pablo de Olavide University, ASWAD‘s 2017 conference host, has a demonstrated commitment to international cooperation and social justice.

CFP: Special Latino Art issue of the Archives of American Art Journal

Call for essay proposals closes March 1

The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art is planning an issue of the Archives of American Art Journal devoted to Latino art. This special issue will offer a valuable opportunity for scholars and artists to increase the visibility of Latino studies in the field of American art history as well as enrich the study of Latino art with primary sources at the Archives of American Art. While the Archives has been collecting the papers of Latino artists for decades, the focused collecting initiative that it launched in 2015 has resulted in the acquisition of many important new collections, which include the personal papers of artists, gallery and organization records, and oral history interviews. You can explore the Archives’ Latino art research collections online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

Essays selected for publication in the journal will offer new approaches to Latino art and artists by thinking in innovative ways about primary sources in the Archives of American Art. Authors must identify the specific collections that will inform their research. Please include the following in a single MS Word document and email it to Tanya Sheehan, editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, SheehanT@si.edu, by March 1, 2017:

* Author name and contact information

* Proposed manuscript title and abstract of no more than 250 words

The journal’s editorial team will review the proposals and then invite select authors to prepare a manuscript of 5,000-7,000 words (including endnotes) for double-blind peer review. Complete manuscripts for review will be due by July 1, 2017. Essays must be previously unpublished and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Archives of American Art Journal is the longest-running scholarly journal devoted to the history of American art. It aims to showcase new approaches to and out-of-the-box thinking about primary sources. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press, the journal contains both peer-reviewed research and commissioned articles based in part on the vast holdings of the Archives.

Information on manuscript submissions and review criteria is available on the journal’s webpage, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/aaa.