Job Opportunity: Curator of Painting and Sculpture, Smith College Museum of Art (Northampton, Mass.) — Apply now

Position Summary:

PRIMARY FUNCTION(S):   Oversee, steward, and develop SCMA’s collection of American and European paintings and sculpture made before 1950.

 

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

Serve as an intellectual authority on, and assume a full range of curatorial responsibilities for, the Museum’s activities related to paintings and sculpture made before 1950. Responsible for the installation, interpretation, documentation, and growth of the collection of paintings and sculpture; proposing and executing temporary exhibitions as well as serving as an in-house curator for traveling exhibitions from other institutions; initiating research on acquisitions, loans, and the permanent collection; fielding public inquiries; representing the department on Museum and College committees.

Work within a team environment, and supervise project-based research assistants and student interns.  Promote dialogue, engagement, and collaboration both within the Museum and beyond.  Work with SCMA’s senior leadership to cultivate prospective donors, foundations, and related entities to support the activities of the department as well as the growth of the collections.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:

Education/Experience: Master’s degree in art history or a closely related field plus a minimum of three years of collection-based curatorial experience or an equivalent combination of education/experience; Ph.D. in art history preferred.

Skills: Independent and self-directed, with the ability to take initiative, anticipate actions needed, and to exercise discretion and independent judgment. Excellent interpersonal and organizational skills. Demonstrated ability to be an effective collaborator both within the Museum and the larger College community.  Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively to diverse audiences. Proven record of scholarly research and knowledge of the history of European or American paintings and sculpture 1800 to 1950. Demonstrated ability to manage multiple tasks, set priorities, and meet deadlines

Additional Information.

Smith College is an EO/AA/Vet/Disability Employer

Job Details
Title: AD0091 – Curator of Paintings and Sculpture
Department: Museum of Art
Job Category: Staff
Position Control: AD0091
Grade: H
Position Category: Regular
Internal/External Position Type: Administrative
FLSA: Exempt

Apply here.

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JOB OPPORTUNITY: Director of Academic Administration, California College of the Arts (San Francisco and Oakland campuses) — apply now

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Photo source: sfgate.com

Apply here, or go to:

https://cca.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/CCA/job/Oakland/Director-of-Academic-Administration_R502544-1

JOB OPPORTUNITY: Associate Provost, California College of the Arts (Oakland)–apply now

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Photo source: Daniel Gonzalez blog

 

Apply here for Associate Provost for Faculty and Academic Partnerships, or go to:

https://cca.wd5.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/CCA/job/Oakland/Associate-Provost_R502291-1

 

 

CFP: CAA 2018/Los Angeles panel–The Photograph, Self-Representation & US Contemporary Art

Alternative Visions: The Photograph, Self-Representation, and Fact in Contemporary Art of the United States 

Chair(s): Natalie Zelt, The University of Texas at Austin, nzelt@utexas.edu
As the editors of “Aperture” recently reminded their readers, “The need for artists to offer persuasive, alternative visions is more urgent than ever.”
In response to that need for creative dissent, this panel investigates the ways contemporary artists use the photograph and self-representation together to craft alternative visions and selves. The photograph’s tangled relationship to truth and identity make it a potent conceptual and compositional tool for artists to challenge the limits of both art historical and social categories. Designed to delineate and define, the photograph continues to circumscribe the visual limits of identity categories, including nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality, well after art historians and cultural critics such as Allan Sekula, Martha Rosler, Sally Stein, and John Tagg called its documentary “truthiness” into question. Additionally, a swell of “post-photography” discourses, ranging from Geoffrey Batchen to Robert Shore, confound the boundaries of the medium, while curators and museums struggle to adapt.
“Alternative Visions” examines the many ways contemporary artists in the United States disrupt the photograph’s master narratives and traditional roles to create subversive, subjective, and contradictory representations of themselves that resist prevailing visual modes.
Presentations will consider an array of questions including: What is the relationship between the photograph and the self in a “post-identity,” “postfact,” and “post-photography” environment? What methods of dissent are evidenced in self-centered photographic practice and what might be their limits? In a contemporary cultural landscape untethered from conventional arbiters of fact, what spaces of resistance can artworks that deploy the photograph create?
For more on the College Art Association conference, go to CAA News Today.

2017 Terra Publication Grant Applications due Sept. 15

Letters of Inquiry for Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grants are due September 15.

The Terra Foundation for American Art International Publication Grant supports book-length scholarly manuscripts in the history of American art, visual studies, and related subjects that are under contract with a publisher. For this grant program, “American art” is defined as art (circa 1500–1980) of what is now the geographic United States. Awards of up to $15,000 will be made in three distinct categories:

  • Grants to US publishers for manuscripts considering American art in an international context
  • Grants to non-US publishers for manuscripts on topics in American art
  • Grants for the translation of books on topics in American art to or from English.

Applicants must submit a letter of inquiry by September 15, 2017. The deadline for the receipt of completed applications is December 15, 2017.

For more information, please visit the College Art Association website, where you will find application guidelines and the application process, schedule, and checklist, or contact CAA Editorial Manager Sarah Zabrodski at szabrodski@collegeart.org or +1 212-392-4424.
Marsden Hartley, Painting No. 501914–15. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1999.61

TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART

120 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611 USA   +1 312 664 3939
121 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris, France   +33 1 43 20 67 01

 

Augustus Washington: Visible, Not Seen

Augustus Washington (1820/21-1875) was “the son of a South Asian immigrant” a formally enslaved black Virginian, according to this article published in The Dartmouth Alumni Magazine this spring. Washington studied at Dartmouth, entering with the class of 1847. There, on the Hanover, New Hampshire campus, Washington learned how to make daguerreotypes. Washington and Dempsey R. Fletcher were the only students of African descent at Dartmouth in 1843-44.

Washington’s portrait of John Brown (circa 1846-47) is well-known. Yet there are no confirmed images of Washington himself. Photo historians have been searching and writing about Washington for decades, and the published literature on Washington continues to grow.

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“Advertisement from The Hartford Daily Courant, October 8, 1852. This ad shows the world having its picture taken at Washington’s studio.” – Image, Connecticut Historical Society

Wilson Jeremiah Moses’ Liberian Dreams: Back to Africa Narratives from the 1850s (Penn State University Press, 2010) provides the opportunity to hear Washington’s voice through his written words. Before his migration to Liberia in 1853, Washington wrote this letter to an US newspaper. In Liberia, Washington was a photographer, a sugar cane planter and landowner, and a politician. (Washington’s Dartmouth classmate, Dempsey R. Fletcher, mentioned above, also had lived in Liberia as boy and returned there after studying at Dartmouth.) The African Colonization Movement is a complex subject, and Washington’s images of its key figures helps us think about “what” Africa was and is.

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Augustus Washington, Urias Africanus McGill, circa 1854-60. Image: Better Photography website 

The Mug Shot—–Tool of the Ideology of Difference

 

 

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Cesare Lombroso, “Epileptics,” from L’homme Criminel (Paris, 1887), photo here.

After reading an article in which the ideas of Cesare Lombardo, aka “The Father of Criminology,” were used to shape anti-Italian US immigration policies in the 1920s, I found that the mug shot is back. It’s not just Tiger Woods’. Check out: “Innocent Until Your Mug Shot Is on the Internet.”

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Image by Alex Tatusian/The Marshall Project from NY Times, 6/3/2017.

Panel on “The Chinese and Iron Road” at University of San Francisco, 4/11/2017, 5:00-6:30 pm

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Horace Baker (engraver), “Across the Continent—The Frank Leslie Transcontinental Excursion,” published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspapers, Apr. 27, 1878, page 129, at Online Archives of California.

Caption also reads “Rounding Cape Horn at the head of the great American Canyon with a view of the South Fork of the American River, where gold was first discovered in 1848. Chinese laborers.”

 

Panelists Sue Lee (Chinese Historical Society of America), Hilton Obenzinger (Stanford University’s Chinese Railroad Worker’s in North America Project), Paulette Liang (a descendant of a Chinese person who worked on the railroad) and James Zarsadiaz (USF) meet to discuss “Reconstructing History, Reconstructing Lives: Chinese Laborers and the Building of the Transcontinental Railroad” at USF’s Gleeson Library tomorrow.

The event is free and open to the public.

Marvel executive says emphasis on diversity may have alienated readers

How many things can be blamed on diversity?

Sian Cain’s article in today’s Guardian makes it clear that Marvel VP of Sales David Gabriel’s reasoning isn’t reasoned. Recently, Gabriel told a gathering that some comic store owners say their customers “have had enough” of new female and ethnic minority characters.

What customers?

Is there a limit to diversity?

Gabriel is not alone in the effort to make diversity appear unprofitable and to present good diversity practices as charitable acts. . .and bad business. Such false beliefs are widespread. Yet, they are counter to research that proves otherwise.

As always, the comments from Guardian readers are worth perusing.  There’re more than 1,000 of them to date. These letters provide great fodder for thinking about the power of representation and the shifts in visual culture.

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Exhibition in a Box/ Autograph ABP

THE MISSING CHAPTER:  BLACK CHRONICLES/EXHIBITION IN A BOX

The Exhibition In A Box provides a photography pop-up archive exhibition display and versatile learning tool-kit, intended for use across a diverse range of spaces, including community centres, schools, colleges, public libraries and other resources such as local archives.

 

Designed to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography, the Exhibition In A Box comprises thirty remarkable A3 image panels produced from rare 19TH century photographs portraying people of African, Caribbean and South Asian descent during the Victorian era in Britain. It comes complete with a set of promotional postcards, information leaflets featuring presentation instructions and adhesive pads, making it ready for installation and fully reusable.

The Exhibition In A Box is a free limited edition resource available from Autograph ABP on application. If you are interested in acquiring one please contact ali@autograph-abp.co.uk to request a copy.

Part of The Missing Chapter programme, supported by Heritage Lottery Fund. Developed in association with and the generous support of the Hulton Archive, a division of Getty Images.

Contents of box

  • Thirty A3 Image Panels
  • Two A3 Text Panels
  • Thirty promotional Postcards
  • Two hundred adhesive Foam Pads
  • Two copies of an Illustrated Leaflet

 

Aims and Objectives

The Exhibition In A Box is specially designed for users to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography by:

Enabling organisers and participants to independently curate their own pop-up exhibition, using all or selected images from Autograph ABP’s acclaimed The Missing Chapter research portfolio.

Providing teachers, tutors and facilitators with a powerful, cross-curricular learning tool-kit supporting formal and informal discussions in classrooms or other facilitated group sessions.

Allowing unique archival photography to be re-used, preserved and presented

multiple times in different settings for a wide range of learning and display needs.

The Photographic Portraits  in The Missing Chapter: Black Chronicles offer a unique snapshot of black lives and migrant experiences during the decades following the birth of photography in 1839.  They represent a diverse range of people, from visiting performers, politicians, dignitaries, servicemen and women, royalty and missionaries, to known personalities and many as yet unidentified individuals living and working in Britain at the time. Their collective presence bears direct witness to the nation’s colonial and imperial history, and the expansion of the British Empire during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

These portraits highlight an important and complex black presence in Britain before 1948, a watershed moment often cited as the beginning of the emergence of a multicultural modern British society after the SS Empire Windrush brought the first large group of West Indian migrants to Britain. Produced in commercial studios during the latter half of the nineteenth century, many lay buried deep within the archives for decades – unseen for more than 125 years.

Cross curriculum links and themes include, but are not limited to, subject areas including Art & Design, Photography, Media Studies, History, English, Geography, Sociology or Citizenship as well as key themes and study skills including Migration, Identity and Cultural Diversity, (Visual) Literacy, Critical Analysis, Research and Representation.

The collections represented include the Hulton Archive (a division of Getty Images), National Portrait Gallery, Royal Collection Trust as well as the private collections of Val Wilmer, Michael Graham-Stuart, Amoret Tanner/FotoLibra, Paul Frecker/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography, and the photographic archive of Autograph ABP, London.