Exhibition in a Box/ Autograph ABP

THE MISSING CHAPTER:  BLACK CHRONICLES/EXHIBITION IN A BOX

The Exhibition In A Box provides a photography pop-up archive exhibition display and versatile learning tool-kit, intended for use across a diverse range of spaces, including community centres, schools, colleges, public libraries and other resources such as local archives.

 

Designed to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography, the Exhibition In A Box comprises thirty remarkable A3 image panels produced from rare 19TH century photographs portraying people of African, Caribbean and South Asian descent during the Victorian era in Britain. It comes complete with a set of promotional postcards, information leaflets featuring presentation instructions and adhesive pads, making it ready for installation and fully reusable.

The Exhibition In A Box is a free limited edition resource available from Autograph ABP on application. If you are interested in acquiring one please contact ali@autograph-abp.co.uk to request a copy.

Part of The Missing Chapter programme, supported by Heritage Lottery Fund. Developed in association with and the generous support of the Hulton Archive, a division of Getty Images.

Contents of box

  • Thirty A3 Image Panels
  • Two A3 Text Panels
  • Thirty promotional Postcards
  • Two hundred adhesive Foam Pads
  • Two copies of an Illustrated Leaflet

 

Aims and Objectives

The Exhibition In A Box is specially designed for users to facilitate engagement programmes to promote cultural diversity through photography by:

Enabling organisers and participants to independently curate their own pop-up exhibition, using all or selected images from Autograph ABP’s acclaimed The Missing Chapter research portfolio.

Providing teachers, tutors and facilitators with a powerful, cross-curricular learning tool-kit supporting formal and informal discussions in classrooms or other facilitated group sessions.

Allowing unique archival photography to be re-used, preserved and presented

multiple times in different settings for a wide range of learning and display needs.

The Photographic Portraits  in The Missing Chapter: Black Chronicles offer a unique snapshot of black lives and migrant experiences during the decades following the birth of photography in 1839.  They represent a diverse range of people, from visiting performers, politicians, dignitaries, servicemen and women, royalty and missionaries, to known personalities and many as yet unidentified individuals living and working in Britain at the time. Their collective presence bears direct witness to the nation’s colonial and imperial history, and the expansion of the British Empire during the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

These portraits highlight an important and complex black presence in Britain before 1948, a watershed moment often cited as the beginning of the emergence of a multicultural modern British society after the SS Empire Windrush brought the first large group of West Indian migrants to Britain. Produced in commercial studios during the latter half of the nineteenth century, many lay buried deep within the archives for decades – unseen for more than 125 years.

Cross curriculum links and themes include, but are not limited to, subject areas including Art & Design, Photography, Media Studies, History, English, Geography, Sociology or Citizenship as well as key themes and study skills including Migration, Identity and Cultural Diversity, (Visual) Literacy, Critical Analysis, Research and Representation.

The collections represented include the Hulton Archive (a division of Getty Images), National Portrait Gallery, Royal Collection Trust as well as the private collections of Val Wilmer, Michael Graham-Stuart, Amoret Tanner/FotoLibra, Paul Frecker/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography, and the photographic archive of Autograph ABP, London.

CFP ASWAD Biennial: panel/proposal submissions: Mar. 3, 2017 deadline

 
Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora
 9th Biennial Conference 
Hosted by Pablo de Olavide University
Seville, Spain
 
African/Diasporic Futures: Re-Envisioning Power, Interventions, Imaginations and Belonging

November 7-11, 2017 Seville, Spain

Deadline for Submission: Friday, March 3, 2017
In 2015 the United Nations launched the Decade for the People of African Descent to acknowledge descendants of the African Diaspora as a distinct group whose human dignities and rights have been violated throughout the globe. The Decade for the People of African Descent is a sustained global commitment to recognize, protect, and bring about inclusive social justice to members of the African Diaspora. Contemporarily, Europe is an epicenter of such urgent grappling with systematic and long-term social inequities. Politics and policies of racialized exclusion, particularly through its engagement with Africans and people of African descent, re-center Europe’s non-neutral racial projects in their nation building.

The protection and promotion of human rights has gained greater significance and urgency with the crisis of African migration, and other forced and semi-forced migrations from Western Asia and Eastern Europe. As these individuals and groups have sought refuge and equitable and humane social participation within European societies, they have challenged conceptualizations of the state and citizenship formation, and continue to force new articulations and notions of “home” and belonging. These current migratory flows are newer iterations of a long relationship between Europe and Africa, and between Europe and the African Diaspora that spans centuries.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 9th biennial conference to be held in Seville, Spain, November 7 to 11, 2017 on the campus of Pablo de Olavide University to discuss, examine, and reflect on the critical nature of the interactions and transformations that African descendants experience in their diaspora, particularly within a European context. As an interdisciplinary organization, ASWAD invites presentations that illuminate the lives of Africans and African descendants from scholars of any discipline, including social sciences, physical sciences, life sciences and performing arts.  We aim to collaborate with activist and intellectual communities around sustained dialogue involving diaspora, race and citizenship, and historical and contemporary patterns of racial formation.

In addition to academics, ASWAD welcomes artists, activists, journalists, and independent scholars with specific interests in the African Diaspora. We are especially keen to create a platform for Black European Groups and NGOs.

We encourage proposals that align with the conference theme. Suggested panel themes include, but are not limited to the following:
a.         The African Diaspora, Modern States and (Re)Conceptions of Citizenship
b.         Humanitarianism and Human Rights in the Global African Diaspora
c.         Black Lives Matter Across the Globe
d.         The African Diaspora, Economics and Immigration to/in Europe

e.         Religion, Power, and Praxis in the African Diaspora

f.          African Diaspora and the Arts and Activism in Europe
g.         Spain and the African Diaspora
h.         Writing and Translating the African Diaspora and Black Identities in Europe
i.          The United Nation’s Decade for People of African Descent
j.          Music and the Performing Arts in Africa and the African Diaspora
k.         Pedagogy, Higher Education and Activism
l.          Black LGBTQIA Social Constructs
m.        Labor and Organizing in Local and International Contexts
n.         Activism and New Technologies and Media
o.         African Diasporic Futures: Challenges and Opportunities
p.        Future Makings: Collective re-imaginations through migration
q.        Reimagining social spaces and collective identities
The city of Seville is a UNESCO world heritage site and former medieval capital of Euro-African kingdoms, both Muslim and Christian, and later head of Spain’s early modern world empire. The city is a nexus of African Diaspora history, with a living heritage of connecting Europe, America and Africa. Pablo de Olavide University, ASWAD‘s 2017 conference host, has a demonstrated commitment to international cooperation and social justice.

CFP: “America Is (Still) Hard to See: New Directions in American Art History,” Association of Historians of American Art (AHAA) session at College Art Association conference, Feb. 21-24, 2018 (Los Angeles, CA)

The 2015 inaugural exhibition of the new Whitney Museum of American Art, America Is Hard to See, charted a largely unconventional history of modern American art built around issues that have galvanized United States artists, pressing them into often uncomfortable relationships with challenging political and social contexts, including the history of slavery, labor unrest and the Vietnam War–and effectively underscoring the point that American is hard to see.

In recent years, scores of museum exhibitions, books and catalogues have worked to reimagine the field among these lines, telling the history of United States art in all of its multilayered, messy complexity. It is not common to find major shows of previously suppressed African-American and Latinx artists as well as scholarly studies of forgotten women and LGBTQ artists. Yet in an era of unprecedented economic inequality, Black Lives Matter, the rise of the alternative right, and anti-immigration reform, there remains much to be done.

This panel seeks to address where American art history from colonial times to the present sits in our twenty-first century classrooms, galleries, museums, blogs and journals–and, more importantly, what directions we might pursue for its future growth. We welcome papers representing all historical periods in American art as well as new avenues of research and methodological inquiry.

Please send a one-page abstract and short c.v. by March 15, 2017, to sessions@ahaaonline.org

AHAA seeks to included new voices, and we encourage younger scholars to make submissions. Chairs and panelists of AHAA-sponsored sessions must be current members of AHAA and CAA.

PhD Opportunity at the Institute for Black Atlantic Research (UK) — Applications Due Feb. 28, 2017

Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 2.55.10 PM.pngUndated photo of Stuart Hall, at IBAR

Applications are invited for a full time PhD (via MPhil) studentship in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences in the Institute for Black Atlantic Research. The studentship is tenable for up to 3 years full-time [subject to satisfactory progress] and will cover the cost of tuition fees at UK/EU rates and a maintenance grant of £7750. International applicants may apply but will be required to pay the difference in tuition fees. The studentship is funded through the Stuart Hall Foundation.

Supervisory team to include Professor Lubaina Himid & Professor Alan Rice.

Project Description

This project will investigate the consequences for artistic process of the Black presence in Northern Britain. It will first research the histories of slavery and migration and historic, cultural and theoretical responses to them in the context of Black Atlantic Cultural Studies before undertaking a creative practice project to make new work looking at either the historical or contemporary manifestations of Black culture in the North. It takes as its starting point the idea that there is an inherent metropolitan and London-centric bias in the discussion of Black culture in Britain and will itself undertake original research and creative practice that works to highlight hitherto neglected and forgotten cultural histories and practices. The project will consist of the creative practice itself and a theoretically and academically informed written up justification of the practice.

Candidates should have (or expect to hold) a UK Bachelor of Arts degree at 2:1 or above in a related area (or equivalent qualification), or a Masters level qualification.

International applicants require an English Language level of UKVI IELTs 6.5 (no sub-score below 6.0) or equivalent qualification.

Further information

For an informal discussion about the project please contact Professor Alan Rice email: arice@uclan.ac.uk

For the application form and full details please visit http://www.uclan.ac.uk/research/study/studentships.php and download an application pack. This will be available during the week beginning 13th February.

Completed application forms should be returned to the Research Student Registry email researchadmissions@uclan.ac.uk

Closing Date: 28 February 2017

Proposed Interview Date: 13 March 2017

 

Q&A with Lubaina Himid–“Black British Art,” Then and Now

lubaina20himid20swallow20hard20the20lancaster20dinner20service202007-20courtesy20the20artist20and20hollybush20gardens-20photo20andy20keate

Lubaina Himid, The Rapid Effects of Abolition, from the Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service series (2007), an assortment of overpainted plates, bowls and terrines at A-N.

Lubaina Himid is enjoying two one-artist exhibitions in the UK this year. Check out her interview with A-N and her piece in Frieze on her influences. About time!

lubaina-himid-mashulan

Lubaina Himid’s grandmother, MaShulan, photographed in Zanzibar in 1954, and reproduced as a poster for the exhibition ‘New Robes for MaShulan – Lubaina Himid, Work Past and Present’, Rochdale Art Gallery, 1987. Courtest: the artist at Frieze

 

 

BRMC Looking for an Executive Director

Executive Director, Black Metropolis Research Consortium (Chicago, IL)

Requisition Number: 102021
Division / Dept.: IT and Digital Scholarship / Black Metropolis Research Consortium
Reports to: Associate University Librarian for IT and Digital Scholarship
Work Schedule: 37.5 hours per week; Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

General Summary

The Black Metropolis Research Consortium is a Chicago-based membership association of libraries, universities, and other archival institutions with a mission to make broadly accessible its members’ holdings that document African American and African diasporic culture, history, and politics, with a special focus on Chicago. The consortium also advocates for the preservation, enhancement, growth, and use of these materials, and the diversity of the information professionals who care for them.

The Executive Director of the Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMRC) provides strategic leadership and operational management for the BMRC’s activities.

In partnership with the BMRC Board of Directors, the Executive Director sets strategic goals and pursues funding opportunities to support BMRC initiatives. The Executive Director is responsible for the Consortium’s day-to-day management and operations. The Executive Director serves as the principal spokesperson for the BMRC to raise its profile both locally and nationally in order to develop new partnerships, recruit new members, and spread awareness of BMRC activities and programs. The Executive Director works closely with the Board on consortium policies, protocols, governance, grant applications, and especially fundraising initiatives. The Executive Director also manages the relationships with current members to ensure their needs are met and their interests are represented.

This position reports to the Associate University Librarian for Information Technology and Digital Scholarship at the University of Chicago, which acts as the BMRC’s host institution and fiscal agent. The position oversees BMRC staff and works with directors, administrators, and faculty at member institutions to manage collaborative projects, internship programs, and the summer fellows program.

Essential Functions

Leadership and Planning:

  • Communicates a compelling vision for the collecting and use of African American archival and special collections.
  • Provides strategic leadership for BMRC projects and activities and works with the BMRC Board to develop and implement long- and short-term goals.
  • Represents BMRC in the local community through presence and involvement in black cultural heritage organization events and activities.
  • Fosters a national reputation for BMRC and facilitates collaboration with related communities through engagement with regional, national, and (where applicable) international conferences, networks, and public events.
  • Develops a national network of scholars and archivists and a broad knowledge of programs and organizations relevant to BMRC subject areas to inform BMRC initiatives.
  • Serves (ex officio) on the BMRC board. Works with BMRC Board Chair to develop meeting agendas, facilitate board initiatives, and make recommendations on Board recruitment. Works with the board on governance structure through the development of ad hoc and advisory committees. Oversees the Annual Meeting of the Faculty Steering Committee.

Program Management:

  • Oversees BMRC projects and programs, including the archival collections survey and database, the Archie Motley Interns, and the Summer Fellows, providing training and orientation necessary to ensure effective and successful programs.
  • Coordinates existing consortium relationships and meetings.
  • Recruits additional BMRC members by reaching out to relevant institutions, community and faith-based organizations, and individuals.
  • Pursues sponsorships to support BMRC events.
  • Writes grant proposals and manages the administration of grants awarded to the University of Chicago in support of all BMRC initiatives and events.
  • Hires, trains, and supervises all administrative and programmatic BMRC staff, and outside consultants as needed.

Communication:

  • Writes and distributes monthly and annual reports on BMRC activities to the Board of Directors, University of Chicago Library, and BMRC members.
  • Visits member institutions to steward effective outreach and engagement and to facilitate BMRC activities at member sites.
  • Oversees the promotion of relevant programming of members through the BMRC website, newsletter, and social networking sites.

Other duties as required.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution required.
  • Master’s or other advanced degree preferred.
  • Experience providing leadership and management of operations that balance long term planning with the daily activities of multiple concurrent projects required.
  • Previous experience in nonprofit, library, archival, public history, or museum organizations preferred.
  • Experience with budget management and planning preferred.
  • Experience developing successful grant proposals and fundraising initiatives preferred.
  • Experience with conference planning preferred.
  • Excellent verbal and written communications skills, including the ability to communicate to large groups as well as one-on-one with students, senior management, faculty, alumni, community members, and others, required.
  • Demonstrated success in building collaborative relationships with diverse constituencies required.
  • Ability to navigate the challenges of working within a complex, decentralized environment required.
  • Willingness and ability to travel, and to work some evenings and weekends required.

To Apply

To apply for this position submit your profile and required materials to https://jobopportunities.uchicago.edu. Resumes sent via mail, fax, or email will not be considered.

All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, protected veteran status, or status as an individual with disability.

The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity / Disabled / Veterans Employer.

Job seekers in need of a reasonable accommodation to complete the application process may contact Human Resources by calling 773-834-1841 or by emailing recruitment@uchicago.edu with their request.

For more info

How Ya Like Me Now?

beyonce-jay-z-ve-obama-ya-beyaz-ozuru-2658810

Last week The Guardian reported on this ridiculously dumb blunder (a euphemism for what it really was).

Richard Dyer, more than twenty years ago, wrote about the position of whiteness as the norm, and this incident reminds us that theories trickle down at variable rates.

Hard not to think of David Hammons’ bitingly incisive  How Ya Like Me Now? (1988), a piece that generated its own complicated response. As is the case with so many Hammons’ projects, How Ya Like Me Now?  seems to speak to our moment, too.

CFP: 4th International Colloquium on Latinos in the US — Abstracts due Jul. 19, 2017

Casa de las Américas (Havana, Cuba) will be the site for a meeting (Oct. 16-20, 2017) focused on the theme “Socialization of Latinos in the United States: Education, Religion and Mass Media.”

The meeting intends to produce a thorough debate regarding the socialization processes that influence the relationships between migrants and their children in American society.

Participants will reflect on the perspectives Latinos in the United States as social subjects immersed in new socialization spaces that create formal educational processes that constitute breakpoints in the establishment of American society while being at the same time participants of informal processes that are substantiated by other socializing agents such as religions and their institutions; and the media and social networks on the Internet. Music and sports are areas that we also want to highlight in order to make them objects of analysis.

 

The Colloquium, consistent with the goals of previous meetings, will create a space of action with the presence of people of Latin American and Caribbean origins who are linked to the arts, literature and social sciences and humanities.

The following are proposed as central themes:

  1. Socialization of Latinos in the United States.
  2. Educative processes for Latinos in the United States as it relates to undocumented students and informal educational spaces.
  3. Public sphere, image and representation of Latinos in mass media.
  4. Music and socialization.
  5. Religions and their institutions as spaces for socialization of Latinos in the United States.

In addition, one of the working sessions will be dedicated to discussion of the history of Cuban emigration to the United States, the insertion of Cubans and Cuban Americans in the Latino communities, and the influence of the new scenarios in Cuba-U.S. relations. Furthermore, tribute will be paid to the life and work of the Cuban artist Ana Mendieta.

ABSTRACTS AND PAPERS

Scholars interested in taking part in the Colloquium may submit individual papers or panels. In either case, the following guidelines should be followed:

  • An abstract of no more than 250 words should be submitted before July 20th, 2017 with the title and name of the author and institution of origin.
  • The conference papers will not exceed 15 pages (double-spaced) which is equivalent to 20 minutes of oral reading.
  • Participants should bring along with the printed text of their presentations, making use of the international standards for notes, citation and bibliography, and the original text in digital format on a flash memory drive or a CD- ROM.RECOMMENDATIONS

    To facilitate your transfer and stay in Cuba, please contact your travel agent or:

    CASA DE LAS AMÉRICAS
    3a y G, El Vedado, La Habana, 10 400, Cuba,
    Telephone: (537) 838-2706/09, ext. 129. Fax: (537) 834-4554

    Emails: latinos@casa.cult.cu; http://www.casadelasamericas.org

 

Instruccíon en español

 

 

Opportunity for Historians of 19th and early 20th-century African American Architecture and Material Culture and Louisiana History and Culture

Betty Reid Soskin is the granddaughter of Louis Charbonnet (1869-1924), architect and builder of Corpus Christi Church and School in New Orleans.  Ms. Soskin has information and memorabilia about her grandfather that she would like to share with reputable researchers of 19th and early 20th-century African American architecture and material culture, and/or Louisiana history and culture.

Initially, a creator of ornamental iron work, Louis Charbonnet became an engineer, inventor and millwright.  His New Orleans business establishment dates to 1893.  After St. Louis School was destroyed in a 1915 storm, Charbonnet drew plans for its reconstruction and supervised the project.

To learn more, contact Ms. Soskin cbreaux@earthlink.net

Also see Betty Reid Soskin’s blog!

louischarbonnetsr

Photo of Louis Charbonnet Sr. at “The Charbonnets” homepage

The Great Man in “Patriots Day”

patriots-day-poster-featured-banner

I’ve been interested in response to Patriots Day, which I’ve not yet seen. Separate from the New York Times review by Glenn Kenny, a feature penned by the Times’ New England Bureau Chief Katharine Q. Seeyle offers the sense that Bostonians have their criticisms of the movie. Among them is the composite character played by Mark Wahlberg. To me, this popular response registers as a critique of the Great Man theory, a notion that’s been under scrutiny in Europe and North America since the nineteenth century.

Wahlberg’s image is being used to promote Patriots Day and this conceptual image is as well. The latter deserves more study than I can give it here. But, as we start a new academic semester this week and next, maybe this ad would be a good one to give to students of visual cultural studies.