Position: Ellyn McColgan Assistant Curator of American Decorative Arts and Sculpture at Museum of Fine Arts/Boston

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston seeks a promising and dynamic scholar in the fields of decorative arts and sculpture to become the Ellyn McColgan Assistant Curator in the Art of the Americas department. We look to hire a team-oriented colleague who will promote, interpret, build, and care for all aspects of this extensive collection, which encompasses art from North, Central, and South America, from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. The McColgan Assistant Curator will work with colleagues across the Museum to achieve the institution’s Strategic Plan goals, such as diversifying and reinterpreting the collection through targeted acquisitions, gallery displays, exhibition development, publications, presentations, and audience engagement.

Candidates should demonstrate excellent research, writing, and speaking skills, as well as the ability to manage complex projects effectively and to deepen relationships with donors and supporters. Ideal candidates will demonstrate a breadth of knowledge and experience, as well as a willingness to gain new expertise. An interest in and commitment to exploring the changing nature of art museums and their relationship to the public is desirable.

Minimum Qualifications and Experience:

• Graduate degree (M.A. or Ph.D.) expected, with specialization in decorative arts and sculpture of the Americas, or related fields.

• Three to five years of experience in a museum or comparable institution.

• Demonstrated scholarly ability through publications, conference papers, or other activities.

• Demonstrated curatorial ability through exhibitions, gallery displays, programs or other activities.

Ideal Candidate Profile:

• Committed to collaboration with others both inside and outside the institution, and ability to make decisions to move plans and objectives forward.

• Strong sense of accountability for achieving stated objectives and demonstrable experience doing so.

• Evident experience working successfully with colleagues to achieve collective objectives in such areas as visitor experience, marketing, education and digital initiatives.

• An international perspective but experienced in becoming personally and professionally committed to an institution’s city, people and artistic community.

• Speaking and/or reading ability in Spanish, French, or other relevant foreign language.

Personal Qualities and Attributes:

• Intellectually rigorous

• Inspirational, passionate, curious

• Generous of spirit, a team player

• Superior judgment, tact and diplomacy, with good organizational skills

Application materials are being accepted immediately. For consideration, please submit your letter of interest and CV to: resumes@mfa.org. You may also submit your materials via postal mail to: Human Resources Department, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115.

The MFA is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer that is committed to building a culturally diverse staff and strongly encourages applications from diverse candidates.


TYPE

Staff

STATUS

Full Time

POSTED

July 13, 2018

DEPARTMENT

Art of the Americas

Advertisements

CFP: Contribute to an Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture (proposals due Sept. 14, 2018)

Calls for Contributors: Book Anthology on Race, Folk, and Ethnography in Visual Culture

Deadline: September 14, 2018

 

The recent rise in problems of immigration and race are of long historical standing.  During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe, increased colonial expansion, industrialization, economic inequality, and nationalism severely tested the assumptions of a shared social fabric. In this, the visual arts performed a key function by amplifying or mitigating racial and ethnic difference. We are seeking proposals for essays that explore representations of race and folk within the context of the disciplines of ethnography and anthropology. The focus of the book will be to examine art’s role in forming social constructions about the interactions between white majority populations with minorities that are indigenous, migratory or nomadic, or relocated through colonization. Proposals are encouraged which look at understudied countries and challenge traditional assumptions, such as perceived homogenous populations (Scandinavia, for example) or those with diverse and shifting multi-ethnic groups, as in Central Europe and Russia. Of particular interest are topics that consider ambiguities and contradict assumptions of uniform binary relations: East-West fusions within racial origins, interracial marriages, fluctuating borders, and migratory populations.  One might consider the fact that the folk were valorized in definitions of national identity simultaneously with the marginalization of indigenous people through racist characterizations and ethnic categorizations.  So too, admiration for the primitive and the popularity of “exotic” people as entertainment co-existed with their denigration.

Proposals are welcome that apply themes from critical race theories, such as the definition of racial identity through social construction, evidence of microaggressions, and practices of essentializing ethnic groups rather than individuals.  How did countries that viewed themselves as progressive and inclusive deal with evidence that contradicted this?  In what ways did multi-ethnic regions foster a common culture while at the same time practicing biological or cultural racism? How did migratory folk populations disrupt conventional definitions of ethnic identity, which were based in part on geography? Proposals are also welcome that consider continuing echoes of these issues later in the twentieth-century; that look at ways in which marginalized minority groups used culture as a means to empower and define themselves; or that focus on the construction of white racial identity.

Proposals should be approximately 300 words and are due by September 14.

Send proposals and c.v. to: Marsha Morton, mortonmarsha10@gmail.com and Barbara Larson, blarson@uwf.edu

 

 

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture”

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art seeks proposals for papers on the topic of “Amateurism and American Visual Culture.” Accepted papers will appear in a guest-edited section of Panorama issue 5.1 (May 2019).

Amateurism, as both a praxis and an attitude, has been a fundamental concept for the development and reception of American art. In the Colonial period, for instance, trained painters and self-taught limners alike were measured against Europe’s professional portraitists, and producers of decorative arts were often viewed as craftspeople or artisans rather than fine artists. And during the nineteenth century itinerant painters and so-called “folk artists” established careers that had little in common with those of artists now recognized as American masters, like Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church. At the same time, however, Americans (Benjamin Franklin, for example) have long admired the “Yankee ingenuity” and “useful knowledge” of self-starters and laypeople.

In the twentieth century amateurism emerged as an invaluable foil for American modernists: Robert Henri encouraged the painting of what one knows rather than what one learns; the regionalist artists disavowed the theoretical expertise of the Stieglitz Circle artists and writers; and the junk stylings of some Neo-Dadaists were complemented by their slapdash techniques and a casual disregard for “high art.” Snapshots, home movies, and hobby art are more obvious, though historically far less visible, examples of artforms that have been classified as amateur, and today, of course, DIY productions, both digital and analog, abound, and everyone with a smartphone is an accidental curator.

The various historical and contemporary categorizations of Native American visual culture are especially relevant to these themes. We know, for instance, that Abstract Expressionists borrowed from supposedly “primitive” artforms to heighten the aura of untutored amateurism around their works. But we also know that appropriation is just one context, and a flawed one at that, for analyzing Native American art, which for better and for worse, often finds itself at the crossroads of the vernacular and the institutional. And, of course, Native American artists have negotiated amateur and professional identities for their own purposes, in order to advance sovereignty, for example, or to participate in markets not entirely their own.

Refreshingly, scholars, curators, and publishers have begun to examine the art and visual culture of amateurism in recent years: there is the enduring appeal of the photographic snapshot and accompanying “snapshot aesthetic,” recent books and articles on amateur film, successful folk art exhibitions, and the National Gallery of Art’s current exhibition Outliers and American Vanguard Art. Nevertheless, the significance of the amateur-professional dialectic to American art requires more critical attention, and, at a time when the arts and humanities are subjected to more and more evaluative measures, the insouciance of amateur art seems more and more urgent.

Panorama seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words that take innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the analysis of amateur art and its material, historical, theoretical terrain. We encourage authors to consider the unique advantages of the journal’s online platform, which permits various digital enhancements, such as high-resolution images with zoom capabilities, the embedding of moving images and films, interactive maps, and the reconstruction of historical exhibitions, to name a few possibilities.

To propose a paper, please send a 500-word abstract and curriculum vitae to Justin Wolff: justin.wolff@maine.edu.

Deadline for proposals: May 15, 2018

Deadline for papers: December 31, 2018

CFP: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Papers: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama is a peer-reviewed, open-access online journal dedicated to American art and visual culture in all media, from the colonial period to the present day. The journal provides a high-caliber international forum for disseminating original research and scholarship and for sustaining a lively engagement with intellectual developments and methodological debates in art history, visual and material cultural studies, museums, and curatorial work. It encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework and seeks to acknowledge in full work by African American, Asian American, Latinx, and Native American artists, makers, curators, art historians, and others engaged in visual cultural production in the United States.

Panorama welcomes submissions that utilize the insights of both traditional and new historical and interpretive approaches to art in the US in both local and global contexts. The editors seek submissions in various formats, including feature length articles (7,000-10,000 words), research notes (maximum of 2,500 words), book and exhibition reviews, and “Bully Pulpit” suggestions–texts that trace a conversation or debate on a topic that is of general interest to the field.

For more information, see: http://journalpanorama.org/submissions/

Roma and African Americans share a common struggle, say Cornel West and Margarete Matache

Cornel West has co-authored an article with Margareta Matache, a Roma rights activist and scholar: it was published in The Guardian last Tuesday. As is always the case with Guardian comments, these are as illuminating to read as the article itself. So are the silences of removed and presumably wack comments: there must be at least a half dozen iterations of “This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards.”

It’s been 25 years since West’s Race Matters was first published in 1998; a new edition with a forward by West. In a new introduction for this anniversary edition, West writes: “Race matters in the twenty-first century are part of a moral and spiritual war over resources, power, souls, and sensibilities.” The introductory chapter focuses on US history–distant and past–and the shout outs are issued mostly to US-based academics and activists. Yet as he has for the last decades, West makes his target imperialism which is phenomenon worked out in a number of national varieties. It’s no doubt useful to call out imperialism in the name of anti-racism: West writes that “[r]ace matters are an integral part–though not sole part–of empire matters” and that “imperial democracy has its own structures of domination.”

A decisive turn to critical race art history in Europe was evident in Saturday’s College Art Association conference panel, “Critical Race Art Histories in German, Scandinavia, and Central Europe,” sponsored by the Historian of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art and Architecture, which, like ACRAH, is a CAA Affiliated Society.

 

Screen Shot 2018-02-25 at 4.41.46 PM

A page from Herman Lundborg’s The Swedish Nation and Racial Types (1921), posted at Anthroscape.

This constellation of images is interesting not only because of the project to illustrate perceived mixed race and mixed ethnic appearances, Casta painting-like, but also because some subjects were presented frontally and in profile while others are not. Is “gipsy-ness” obvious enough in the top right frontal portrait? We can head back to Allan Sekula’s “The Body and the Archive” , an examination of the taxonomic photo. Yet, there was something else happening in the many nineteenth- and twetienth-century drawings and prints. (A Google Image search will yield a good number of these representations.) Seems like many Western artists chose the 3/4 profile view to demonstrate ethno-racial particularity. Why? One ear tells all? The shadow on one cheek is more than enough?

Curator, Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College (Winter Park, FL) — Apply Now

For more information,  look here.

Curator

Job no: 492722
Work type: Staff (Full-Time)
Location: Winter Park, FL
Categories: Cornell Fine Arts Museum
Division: Academic Affairs

The Curator is responsible for collection scholarship as well as exhibitions, acquisitions, research and publications. Working closely with the Bruce A. Beal Director, the Curator plans and implements an ambitious schedule of exhibitions and educational programs built around, and complementing, the permanent collection.  The museum has been on a path of rapid growth and is engaged in plans for a new facility; the Curator will work closely with the Director to take the museum into its next institutional phase and future home.  Additionally, the Curator is the liaison with Rollins faculty and students, and actively pursues strategies of engagement for campus and community alike.

The Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College is a teaching museum that stimulates transformative encounters with works of art while integrating art learning into daily life for campus and community.

Primary responsibilities include:

  • Oversees the research, exhibition, care and publication of the permanent collection. Part of the contemporary art collection is on view at The Alfond Inn, a boutique hotel owned by Rollins whose proceeds go to student scholarships.
    • The collection comprises over 5,500 works of art ranging from antiquity to contemporary and includes the only European Old Masters collection in the Orlando area, a growing American art collection, and the forward looking Alfond Collection of Contemporary Art. Holdings also include Bloomsbury Group paintings and drawings; over 1,500 European and American works on paper; and ethnographic objects.
    • Works with Bruce A. Beal Director and the Collections Committee of the Board (of which s/he is an ex-officio member) on strategy and development of the collection, including making specific recommendations for acquisitions.
  • Oversees planning, R&D and implementation of museum exhibitions including:
    • Acts as curator or co-curator on select exhibitions, and/or liaises with guest curators and other contributors, with partner institutions and the Rollins campus.
    • Works with the Collections and Exhibitions Manager and Lead Preparator on installations, exhibition and graphic design, and with other staff on PR and outreach for exhibitions.
  • Works collaboratively with the Bruce A. Beal Director to plan and implement educational programs and public events consistent with the mission of the museum.
  • Supervises the curatorial staff of the museum (Collection and Exhibitions Manager; Lead Preparator; Dale Montgomery Curatorial Fellow; Education Coordinator); the Fred Hicks Fellow (a yearly fellowship for a Rollins student) and other interns.
  • Provides scholarship for Museum catalogs and other publications, as well as for special educational programs and public lectures.

Minimum Qualifications:

 

  • Advanced degree in Art History (Ph.D. preferred) with specialty in contemporary art backed by broad knowledge of European and American art history and a record of scholarly publications.
  • At least ten years of curatorial experience in an art museum including collection care and a track record of successful exhibitions; experience with an encyclopedic collection a plus.
  • Superior interpersonal, written and verbal communication skills; must be a proactive team member and enjoy the environment of a small, hands-on museum staff. Excellent managerial, planning, and organizational skills a must, as well as the ability to multitask, prioritize and perform under pressure.
  • Commitment to excellence in all aspects of museum work including scholarship, education, collections care, public outreach and institutional development.

 

Special Instructions to Applicants:

To apply, please submit an application and upload the following materials:

  1. Cover letter
  2. Resume

Screening of applications will begin immediately.

Rollins offers a competitive salary plus a generous benefits package featuring comprehensive health insurance coverage, generous paid time off, retirement savings plan with generous employer contribution, full tuition waiver after one year for employees, spouses, domestic partners and dependents.

Our Values: 

Rollins seeks to foster and to model a campus environment that is welcoming, safe, and inclusive to all of our administrators, faculty, staff, and students. We view differences (e.g. nationality, race, gender, age, sexual orientation, socioeconomic class, physical ability, learning styles, perspectives, etc.) not as obstacles to be overcome but as rich opportunities for understanding, learning, and growth.

Through its mission, Rollins College is firmly committed to creating a just community that embraces multiculturalism; persons from historically under-represented minority groups are therefore encouraged to apply. Rollins does not discriminate on the basis of sex, disability, race, age, religion, color, national or ethnic origin, ancestry, marital status, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, genetic information, physical characteristics, or any other category protected by federal, state, or local law, in its educational programs and activities.

Research on Louisiana to Northern California African-American migration, pre-1980s

A San Jose State University sociologist is documenting African-American migration from Louisiana to San Francisco Bay Area before the 1980s and the subsequent resettlement experiences of the migrants.

  • If you or your parents migrated from Louisiana and settled in the San Francisco Bay Area prior to the 1980s, you are invited to participate in a research study conducted by Faustina M. DuCros, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences at San José State University.
  • The purpose of this research study is to document the migration and re-settlement experiences of migrants and children of migrants from Louisiana in the San Francisco Bay Area.
  • If you volunteer for this research study, you will be asked to participate in an audio-recorded life history interview that will last about two hours; in some cases additional sessions may be needed to complete the life history. During the interview, you will be asked about your background, your migration experiences or those of your parents, and your experiences in the Bay Area. The interview will be conducted at a time and location convenient for you.
  • Participation is entirely voluntary and confidential. You may stop your participation at any time without penalty.
  • If you have questions or would like to participate, please contact:Faustina DuCros, Ph.D.
    San José State University
    One Washington Square
  • San José, CA 95125Louisiana-Migrants@sjsu.edu

    408-924-5325

Art Historian Helen M. Shannon’s Passing

Capture5

Helen M. Shannon, Ph.D., flanked by Dr. David Milburn and Cecile Keith Brown, date unknown. Source: Dr. David Milburn Legacy Award webpage. Photographer’s name not known.

 

It is with deep sadness that we report the passing of Helen M. Shannon, Ph.D. The photo was likely taken when Helen worked in the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Education Department, 1976-87, according to her LinkedIn page.

We have suffered a profound loss in our field and it will be felt among those with whom she worked. A few years back, a former student wrote that Helen Shannon had been an important mentor, calling her “one of the most inspirational career driven women I have ever met. I have never had a professor who has pushed me so hard to succeed, and I will be forever grateful to the role she has played in the development of my career as I pursue my Master’s Degree.” Helen inspired many of us, and she will not be forgotten.

Mark Campbell of the University of Arts, where Helen was Associate Professor and Director of the M.A. Program in Museum Studies, has written this account of his colleague:

“It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of
Associate Professor Helen Shannon. Helen has been a well-respected
member of the UArts faculty since joining the University in 2006,
directing the Museum Education program within Museum Studies, and
since fall 2013 serving as coordinator of Graduate Studies. An
accomplished educator and museum professional, Helen has had a deep
and lasting effect on the scholarship and professional training in her
field.

Helen received a BA from Stanford University, an MA from the
University of Chicago, and a PhD from Columbia University – all in Art
History. Her dissertation was titled “Race and cultural nationalism in
the American modernist reception of African art.”  Notable
professional appointments include executive director of the New Jersey
State Museum and educator in charge, Office of Public Programs, at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art. Freelance curatorial work includes “In the
Spirit of Martin: The Living Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,” a
Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition, and “Biennial 2000: At
the Crossroads,” for the African American Museum in Philadelphia.

In 2015 Helen published, “Norman Lewis: Presence and Absence” as part
of “Procession: The Art of Norman Lewis” (University of California
Press – Ruth Fine Editor). She was in the process of completing an
important book in the field of Museum Education, “History and
Understanding of Museum Learning.”  Active in the museum world through
lectures and symposia, Helen has served on many boards including
current appointments with the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums and
the African American Museum.  She was also an ongoing member of the
African American Collection Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of
Art.

Within the UArts community and beyond, Helen was a respected scholar,
known for her integrity, grace and solid professionalism. She
instilled in her many students a tenacious work ethic, deep respect
for knowledge, and an awareness of the central role that museums play
in the enrichment of our lives.

An event celebrating the life of Helen Shannon will be announced to
the community in the coming weeks.”

 

– –Mark Campbell, Dean

College of Art, Media & Design

The University of the Arts

320 Broad Street

Philadelphia, PA 19102

215.717.6120

uarts.edu

 

 

IMAGE BELOW: From the award-winning exhibition catalogueProcession: The Art of Norman Lewis (2015). Source: GoogleBooks.

 

Screen Shot 2018-01-21 at 6.37.54 PM

Appel Curatorial Fellowship–Delaware Art Museum (apply by Mar. 1, 2018)

ALFRED APPEL, JR.  CURATORIAL FELLOWSHIP


The Delaware Art Museum is pleased to offer an annual Curatorial Fellowship. This two-month Fellowship is intended for graduate students working towards a Museum career. This Fellowship honors Alfred Appel, Jr., a leading scholar of American Studies and a collector of modern prints and photographs.

The focus of the Fellowship changes each year based on institutional need. The Fellowship requires two months of full-time work, or the equivalent in part-time hours. The timing of the Fellowship is flexible and can be carried out full-time or part-time, based on applicant and institutional commitments, and must be served between April and September 2018.

The 2018 Appel Curatorial Fellow will research the work of Edward Loper, Sr. and Edward Loper, Jr. and write a scholarly essay for inclusion in the artists’ 2019 exhibition catalogue. The show, on view March–August 2019, will survey the artistic development of these two artists—father and son—and the establishment of the Loper tradition in the greater Wilmington area. Loper, Sr. is one of Delaware’s most celebrated artists, having lived his entire life in the state and taught generations of local artists. His son, Loper, Jr., was equally prolific and participated in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the region. Their styles, though different, are distinct for their approach to form and color and show the acknowledgment of modernist traditions from the turn of the 20th century. The exhibition will be assembled from the collections of the Delaware Art Museum, other public institutions, local corporations, and private individuals.

The Appel Curatorial Fellow will work closely with Margaret Winslow, Curator of Contemporary Art.

Receiving the fellowship
A stipend of $3,500 is available for the Fellowship. The Fellowship is intended for those who are currently enrolled in an art history graduate program and are planning a museum career. While the project may require off-site research, the fellow is expected to work on site regularly during the period of the Fellowship.

 

Important Dates

The deadline to apply is March 1, 2018. Notification of the successful applicant will be announced by April 1, 2018. The chosen candidate will then be asked to provide a date for assuming the Fellowship by May 1, 2018. The Fellowship must be carried out between May 1, 2018 and September 30, 2018.

 

TO APPLY

Applications for the 2018 Appel Fellowship, including a cover letter, resume, and two letters of recommendation as an MS Word or PDF attachment may be emailed to Margaret Winslow, Curator of Contemporary Art, mwinslow@delart.org.

We are committed to inclusivity and encourage qualified candidates from all cultures and communities to apply. Delaware Art Museum is an equal opportunity employer.

 

A.I.-Generated Images and the Play to Diversity

ai-generated-photos-1514935235304-facebookJumbo

From the NYTimes online site, accessed Jan. 3, 2018

 

The headline in the online version of a Jan. 2 NY Times story is an interesting twist from the way the same article is presented in the today’s print issue: the latter, which cites the byline of Cady Metz, “She Could Be a Star, if She Existed.” (The online version’s header is “How and A.I. ‘Cat-and-Mouse Game’ Generates Believable Fake Photos.”)

There’s certainly a lot going on here: for visual studies scholars and art historians, A.I. research that converts “images of horses into zebras and Monets into Van Goghs” is another visual turn, one that exceeds the predictions of Benjamin and Malraux. Then, there’s the interest in “truth” versus “falsity” as scientists develop generative adversarial networks that can “generate faux images and doctor the real thing” by putting words in the mouths of videoed speakers.

One scientist’s assessment of current research made me think about the ways in which bodily statements, representations, and recognitions are patterning strategies that animals rely on; we humans read race and other differentiating traits based on groupings to construct homogeneity and heterogeneity. Durk Kingma, whose work is funded by Tesla’s Elon Musk, is excited about the Finnish commuter chip maker Nvidia’s breakthrough technology. Kingma’s published remark: “We now have a model that can generate faces that are most diverse and in some ways more realistic than what we can program by hand.” Nvidia’s maximizing and extending diversity beyond what is experienced in everyday life is a viewed as a public good.

The marketing of diversity is not only significant because it demonstrates that paragon appearance–at least right now–is kinda Jennifer Aniston-y, kinda Selena Gomez-y.  It’s also that “diversity” can be produced on the surface. These efforts are designed to desegregate representational fields and to integrate different bodies into them. What is produced is the look of diversity, fairness, equity, and justness. As Machiavelli wrote, appearance is more important than reality.

Discussions of visuality are more necessary than ever.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: