CFP: “America Is (Still) Hard to See: New Directions in American Art History,” Association of Historians of American Art (AHAA) session at College Art Association conference, Feb. 21-24, 2018 (Los Angeles, CA)

The 2015 inaugural exhibition of the new Whitney Museum of American Art, America Is Hard to See, charted a largely unconventional history of modern American art built around issues that have galvanized United States artists, pressing them into often uncomfortable relationships with challenging political and social contexts, including the history of slavery, labor unrest and the Vietnam War–and effectively underscoring the point that American is hard to see.

In recent years, scores of museum exhibitions, books and catalogues have worked to reimagine the field among these lines, telling the history of United States art in all of its multilayered, messy complexity. It is not common to find major shows of previously suppressed African-American and Latinx artists as well as scholarly studies of forgotten women and LGBTQ artists. Yet in an era of unprecedented economic inequality, Black Lives Matter, the rise of the alternative right, and anti-immigration reform, there remains much to be done.

This panel seeks to address where American art history from colonial times to the present sits in our twenty-first century classrooms, galleries, museums, blogs and journals–and, more importantly, what directions we might pursue for its future growth. We welcome papers representing all historical periods in American art as well as new avenues of research and methodological inquiry.

Please send a one-page abstract and short c.v. by March 15, 2017, to sessions@ahaaonline.org

AHAA seeks to included new voices, and we encourage younger scholars to make submissions. Chairs and panelists of AHAA-sponsored sessions must be current members of AHAA and CAA.

CFP: 4th International Colloquium on Latinos in the US — Abstracts due Jul. 19, 2017

Casa de las Américas (Havana, Cuba) will be the site for a meeting (Oct. 16-20, 2017) focused on the theme “Socialization of Latinos in the United States: Education, Religion and Mass Media.”

The meeting intends to produce a thorough debate regarding the socialization processes that influence the relationships between migrants and their children in American society.

Participants will reflect on the perspectives Latinos in the United States as social subjects immersed in new socialization spaces that create formal educational processes that constitute breakpoints in the establishment of American society while being at the same time participants of informal processes that are substantiated by other socializing agents such as religions and their institutions; and the media and social networks on the Internet. Music and sports are areas that we also want to highlight in order to make them objects of analysis.

 

The Colloquium, consistent with the goals of previous meetings, will create a space of action with the presence of people of Latin American and Caribbean origins who are linked to the arts, literature and social sciences and humanities.

The following are proposed as central themes:

  1. Socialization of Latinos in the United States.
  2. Educative processes for Latinos in the United States as it relates to undocumented students and informal educational spaces.
  3. Public sphere, image and representation of Latinos in mass media.
  4. Music and socialization.
  5. Religions and their institutions as spaces for socialization of Latinos in the United States.

In addition, one of the working sessions will be dedicated to discussion of the history of Cuban emigration to the United States, the insertion of Cubans and Cuban Americans in the Latino communities, and the influence of the new scenarios in Cuba-U.S. relations. Furthermore, tribute will be paid to the life and work of the Cuban artist Ana Mendieta.

ABSTRACTS AND PAPERS

Scholars interested in taking part in the Colloquium may submit individual papers or panels. In either case, the following guidelines should be followed:

  • An abstract of no more than 250 words should be submitted before July 20th, 2017 with the title and name of the author and institution of origin.
  • The conference papers will not exceed 15 pages (double-spaced) which is equivalent to 20 minutes of oral reading.
  • Participants should bring along with the printed text of their presentations, making use of the international standards for notes, citation and bibliography, and the original text in digital format on a flash memory drive or a CD- ROM.RECOMMENDATIONS

    To facilitate your transfer and stay in Cuba, please contact your travel agent or:

    CASA DE LAS AMÉRICAS
    3a y G, El Vedado, La Habana, 10 400, Cuba,
    Telephone: (537) 838-2706/09, ext. 129. Fax: (537) 834-4554

    Emails: latinos@casa.cult.cu; http://www.casadelasamericas.org

 

Instruccíon en español

 

 

EVENT: Black Art & Activism NOW @ Decolonize This Place 12/04/2016

blk-art-activism-flyer

 

Filmmakers Cheryl Dunye & Dee Rees @San Francisco State University (Sept. 23-24, 2016)

cheryl-dunye

Portrait of Cheryl Dunye (https://apps.chss.sfsu.edu/newsletters/thewatermelonwoman/index.html)

 

Black/Feminist/Lesbian/Queer/Trans* Cultural Production: A Symposium Honoring the 20th Anniversary of Cheryl Dunye’s “The Watermelon Woman”

This symposium honors the 20th anniversary of Cheryl Dunye’s film, “The Watermelon Woman” (1996). The first feature film directed by and starring a black lesbian, the production of this film marked a watershed moment for black cinema, feminist cinema, lesbian cinema, and new queer cinema. Appearing in the heyday of what filmmaker and scholar Yvonne Welbon has called the “golden age” of black queer cinema, the film garnered widespread critical acclaim, and its success inspired many black lesbians to create their own films in the years following. Her latest release, “Black is Blue” (2014) is a critically acclaimed narrative short film that follows the life of a black transgender man in Oakland, California. Dunye continues to break ground through complex filmic representations of the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. Thus, this conference honors Dunye’s growing body of work, as well as her cultural legacy.

dee-rees

Photo of Dee Rees (http://thefilmexperience.net/blog/2016/6/29/welcome-to-the-academy-683-of-you.html)

Dee Rees will be in conversation with Cheryl Dunye on Fri., Sept. 23, 2016 @7 p.m. Pacific Time at McKenna Theatre, Creative Arts Building, SFSU.

The Conference, sponsored by The College of Health and Social Sciences, Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality, Dean of the College of Health and Social Sciences, Dean of the College of Creative and Liberal Arts, Jamie and Phyllis Pasker Funds, Queer Cinema Institute at San Francisco State University, Watermelon Woman 3.0, and Black Sexual Economies Working Group (Washington University-St. Louis), is free and open to the public.

For more information on the symposium, please go to: Watermelon Woman Anniversary Symposium

On Cheryl Dunye’s Watermelon Woman: The Watermelon Woman

On Dee Rees, see: Dee Rees at IMDB.COM

Black Activism & Photography from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement (Sept. 17, 2016, BAMPFA, Berkeley, CA)

Screen shot 2016-09-02 at 11.17.06 AM

Photo of Makeda D. Best, Ph.D.(www.bampfa.org)

When Sojourner Truth declared that she sold the “shadow” (photographic portraits of herself) to support the “substance” (the causes of abolition and the rights of women), she recognized the power of images to shape opinion and create economic value. How did the former slave strategically deploy and circulate photography as a form of political activism? Join a conversation with UC Berkeley professors Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby (History of Art) and Leigh Raiford (African American Studies) and photographer/photography historian Makeda Best of the California College of the Arts on the uses to which photography has been put in the African American struggle for political change.

Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor in the Arts and Humanities at UC Berkeley. Grigsby specializes in eighteenth- through early twentieth-century French and American art and visual and material culture, particularly in relation to the politics of race, slavery, and colonialism. She is the author of three books: Extremities: Painting Empire in Post-Revolutionary France (2002); Colossal: Engineering the Suez Canal, Statue of Liberty, Eiffel Tower and Panama Canal(2012); and Enduring Truths: Sojourner’s Shadows and Substance(2015).

Leigh Raiford is associate professor of African American Studies at UC Berkeley. She is the author of Imprisoned in a Luminous Glare: Photography and the African American Freedom Struggle (2011).

Makeda Best, assistant professor in Visual Studies at the California College of the Arts, is an historian of photography. She is currently revising a book on the Civil War–era photographer Alexander Gardner, and coediting a volume titled Conflict, Identity and Protest in American Art.

 

See: BAMPFA Roundtable Discussion

 

All Power to the People: Black Panthers @50: Exhibition, Anniversary Commemoration, and Symposium (Fall 2016) at the Oakland Museum of California

The Panthers, in more ways than one, sought to visualize racial identity. Their model continues to inform new movements across the globe.

Revolutionary Art (circa 1969) by Emory Douglas, Black Panther Minister of Culture, Oakland, CA.

posters-still.

See: Black Panther exhibition and programs at OMCA

Call for Paper Abstracts: August Wilson Society Conference (June 30, 2016 deadline)

August Wilson Society Paper Abstracts information

 

Call for Abstracts

Concerning the Spiritual in Art: Lecture at the Tang on April 14

Nikki G Ph.D.

Thursday, 4/14 at 7:30 p.m.

Nikki A. Greene, Ph.D.

Concerning the Spiritual in Art: The Substance of Abstraction

On abstraction, music and painting in the works of Moe Brooker, Beauford Delaney & Alma Thomas.

Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College

The exhibition Alma Thomas is currently on view at the Tang Teaching Museum and is curated by Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Museum and Lauren Haynes, Associate Curator, Permanent Collection at the Studio Museum, New York. 

Alma Thomas remains at the Tang until June 5. The show opens at theStudio Museum in Harlem on July 14.

Please join us!

NikkiAGreene_Tang Poster

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CFP: Assoc. of Historians of Amer Art (due Apr. 4)

Call for Papers due Apr. 4, 2016 (Association of Historians of American Art)

CFP: “The Gustatory Turn”

Call for Papers: The Gustatory Turn in American Art
AHAA sponsored session at CAA
February 15-18, 2017, New York

Co-chairs: Guy Jordan, Western Kentucky University and Shana Klein, National Museum of American History

The rapid emergence of food studies programs, food studies journals, and museum exhibitions devoted to food reveals how the role of taste and digestion in American art has become a vibrant topic of study. This session examines the relationships between ocular and gastronomic delectation and visual consumption in paintings, prints, cookbooks, dietary manuals, and other forms of media that represent food and drink. This panel specifically invites papers that consider how artists used formal techniques to elicit pleasure or disgust in images of food and drink and how viewers responded to the sweet or unsavory qualities of an image. Paper proposals might also consider how images of food and drink interact with the social conventions of eating, dining, and consuming in their respective time periods. Proposals that evaluate the mechanics of taste and the ways in which these mechanics engage with political life and discourses of identity (i.e. race, class, and gender) are also welcome. The goal of this panel is to showcase scholarship that complements and advances the gustatory turn in American art.

Please send a one-page abstract and short c.v. by Monday, April 4 to Guy Jordan (guydjordan@gmail.com) and Shana Klein (Shana.Klein@gmail.com).