Residency (Orange Co., CA) for Artists and Art Historians–Apply now through Dec. 15, 2017

The 36 Chase & Barns Residency is extending its application deadline for all  interested art history/curatorial studies candidates.  The 36 Chase & Barns Residency offers spaces to up to three visual artists and one art history/curatorial studies candidate each term. 
We are still actively looking for strong applicants from diverse backgrounds, working in the areas of curatorial studies and arthistory research. We will continue to accept applications to fill this vacancy for the March- May 2018 residency until Friday, December 15th.  
Art historians and curatorial candidates of color and/or any applicants who are conducting research and writing criticism specifically addressing the many overlooked contributions of female artists, artists of color and artists from the LGBTQ communities are strongly encouraged to apply. 
We are no longer accepting applications from visual artists for the March- May 2018 residency term. Our next residency term will begin in July of 2018.
Click here to apply or go directly here.
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JOB OPPORTUNITY: Assistant Professor of Mural, Painting and Large-Scale Digital Public Practices–CSU-Monterey Bay

Apply on or before Jan. 15, 2018.

2017 William H. Johnson Prize Application——-Deadline Nov. 16, 2017, 6 pm Eastern

2017 WILLIAM H. JOHNSON PRIZE
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION: THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2017, 6PM Eastern Time

The William H. Johnson Foundation for the Arts is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that seeks to encourage African American artists early in their careers by offering financial grants. The Johnson Foundation awards grants to individuals who work in the following media: painting, photography, sculpture, printmaking, installation and/or new genre.

The William H. Johnson Prize is awarded annually to an early-career African American artist. For our purposes, “early-career” is a flexible term that should be interpreted liberally to include artists who have finished their academic work within twelve years from the year that a prize is awarded. For example, a person who finished their studies in 2005 is eligible to apply in 2017, but not in 2018. Age is not determinative, and artists who have not earned BFAs or MFAs are still eligible so long as they have not been working as a professional artist for more than twelve years.

The 2017 William H. Johnson Prize is $25,000 and the winner will be announced in December 2017.

APPLYING FOR THE 2017 JOHNSON PRIZE

READY TO BEGIN THE APPLICATION?
All applications must be submitted online, and the application must be started and completed in the same online session. Changes cannot be made to an application after it’s been submitted. The 2017 Johnson Prize Application Worksheet is provided as a tool for applicants to use prior to starting the online application, to ensure that applicants have prepared all the materials required for completing and submitting the application.

QUESTIONS?
Take a look at the foundation’s responses to Frequently Asked Questions.

 

 

Augustus Washington: Visible, Not Seen

Augustus Washington (1820/21-1875) was “the son of a South Asian immigrant” a formally enslaved black Virginian, according to this article published in The Dartmouth Alumni Magazine this spring. Washington studied at Dartmouth, entering with the class of 1847. There, on the Hanover, New Hampshire campus, Washington learned how to make daguerreotypes. Washington and Dempsey R. Fletcher were the only students of African descent at Dartmouth in 1843-44.

Washington’s portrait of John Brown (circa 1846-47) is well-known. Yet there are no confirmed images of Washington himself. Photo historians have been searching and writing about Washington for decades, and the published literature on Washington continues to grow.

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“Advertisement from The Hartford Daily Courant, October 8, 1852. This ad shows the world having its picture taken at Washington’s studio.” – Image, Connecticut Historical Society

Wilson Jeremiah Moses’ Liberian Dreams: Back to Africa Narratives from the 1850s (Penn State University Press, 2010) provides the opportunity to hear Washington’s voice through his written words. Before his migration to Liberia in 1853, Washington wrote this letter to an US newspaper. In Liberia, Washington was a photographer, a sugar cane planter and landowner, and a politician. (Washington’s Dartmouth classmate, Dempsey R. Fletcher, mentioned above, also had lived in Liberia as boy and returned there after studying at Dartmouth.) The African Colonization Movement is a complex subject, and Washington’s images of its key figures helps us think about “what” Africa was and is.

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Augustus Washington, Urias Africanus McGill, circa 1854-60. Image: Better Photography website 

Marvel executive says emphasis on diversity may have alienated readers

How many things can be blamed on diversity?

Sian Cain’s article in today’s Guardian makes it clear that Marvel VP of Sales David Gabriel’s reasoning isn’t reasoned. Recently, Gabriel told a gathering that some comic store owners say their customers “have had enough” of new female and ethnic minority characters.

What customers?

Is there a limit to diversity?

Gabriel is not alone in the effort to make diversity appear unprofitable and to present good diversity practices as charitable acts. . .and bad business. Such false beliefs are widespread. Yet, they are counter to research that proves otherwise.

As always, the comments from Guardian readers are worth perusing.  There’re more than 1,000 of them to date. These letters provide great fodder for thinking about the power of representation and the shifts in visual culture.

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EXH: “Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze” @ David Driskell Center, opens March 2nd

The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park is proud to announce its spring exhibition, Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze. The exhibition, organized by the Driskell Center, is curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton, assisted by Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron. The exhibition will be on display at the Driskell Center from Thursday, March 2, 2017 through Friday, May 26, 2017, with an opening reception on Thursday, March 2nd, from 5-7PM.

Q&A with Lubaina Himid–“Black British Art,” Then and Now

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Lubaina Himid, The Rapid Effects of Abolition, from the Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service series (2007), an assortment of overpainted plates, bowls and terrines at A-N.

Lubaina Himid is enjoying two one-artist exhibitions in the UK this year. Check out her interview with A-N and her piece in Frieze on her influences. About time!

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Lubaina Himid’s grandmother, MaShulan, photographed in Zanzibar in 1954, and reproduced as a poster for the exhibition ‘New Robes for MaShulan – Lubaina Himid, Work Past and Present’, Rochdale Art Gallery, 1987. Courtest: the artist at Frieze

 

 

REF: Portrait of Aubré Maynard by Yun Gee

In celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and Black History Month, the Museum of the City of New York is exhibiting a portrait of Dr. Aubré de Lambert Maynard, by artist Yun Gee. Dr. Maynard is best remembered today for his role in helping to save Dr. King life’s after an assassination attempt in […]

via Profiles in Freedom: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, Dr. Aubre Maynard, and Yun Gee — MCNY Blog: New York Stories

John W. Mosley’s Mid-20th Century Photos of Black Philadelphia 

Check out @hyperallergic’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/hyperallergic/status/813744006114971648?s=09

ISCP Dedalus Foundation Artist Residency: Call for Applications

Deadline Oct. 15, 2016