JOB: Curatorial Assistant Position, American Art @ Whitney Museum of Art

A full-time Curatorial Assistant position, reporting to the DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, is available. The incumbent will work with the Director and his team on all matters related to the development and display of the Museum’s esteemed collection of modern and contemporary American art, assisting with scholarly projects as well as a variety of administrative tasks. Excellent research and writing skills a must, and a focus in American art before 1945 strongly preferred.

Responsibilities include: scholarly research on artists and acquisitions; preparation and writing of didactic texts; assistance in the planning and installation of collection displays, including management of checklists, schedules, and databases; coordination of gifts and support of Museum committees dedicated to acquisitions and loans; maintenance of object files; serving as liaison with the Director of the Collection’s internal and external contacts, including artists, trustees, donors, scholars, and museum departments such as Conservation, Exhibitions and Collections Management, Publications, and Research Resources ; daily administrative support (telephone, management of the Director of the Collection’s calendar; maintenance of records, drafting correspondence, preparation of presentations, travel arrangements, processing invoices, and other general office and clerical duties).

Job requirements:   B.A. in art history (M.A. a plus); 3 years museum/gallery experience; working knowledge of 20th- and 21st-century art history with a focus in American art before 1945; clerical and organizational skills, including experience with TMS, Microsoft Office, Excel, and PowerPoint; excellent writing, research, and communication skills, with attention to detail; ability to handle several projects simultaneously and meet deadlines.

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:  hr@whitney.org and state “Curatorial Assistant” in the subject line.

See http://whitney.org/About/JobPostings

About the Whitney

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for 86 years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.

CFP: Special Latino Art issue of the Archives of American Art Journal

Call for essay proposals closes March 1

The Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art is planning an issue of the Archives of American Art Journal devoted to Latino art. This special issue will offer a valuable opportunity for scholars and artists to increase the visibility of Latino studies in the field of American art history as well as enrich the study of Latino art with primary sources at the Archives of American Art. While the Archives has been collecting the papers of Latino artists for decades, the focused collecting initiative that it launched in 2015 has resulted in the acquisition of many important new collections, which include the personal papers of artists, gallery and organization records, and oral history interviews. You can explore the Archives’ Latino art research collections online at http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections.

Essays selected for publication in the journal will offer new approaches to Latino art and artists by thinking in innovative ways about primary sources in the Archives of American Art. Authors must identify the specific collections that will inform their research. Please include the following in a single MS Word document and email it to Tanya Sheehan, editor of the Archives of American Art Journal, SheehanT@si.edu, by March 1, 2017:

* Author name and contact information

* Proposed manuscript title and abstract of no more than 250 words

The journal’s editorial team will review the proposals and then invite select authors to prepare a manuscript of 5,000-7,000 words (including endnotes) for double-blind peer review. Complete manuscripts for review will be due by July 1, 2017. Essays must be previously unpublished and not under consideration for publication elsewhere.

The Archives of American Art Journal is the longest-running scholarly journal devoted to the history of American art. It aims to showcase new approaches to and out-of-the-box thinking about primary sources. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press, the journal contains both peer-reviewed research and commissioned articles based in part on the vast holdings of the Archives.

Information on manuscript submissions and review criteria is available on the journal’s webpage, http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/aaa.

CFP: “Refracting Abstraction” symposium @ Stanford University, Jan. 27-28, 2017 | deadline Oct. 3, 2016

The Anderson Collection, Standford University

Photo (2014): Tim Griffiths at Stanford News

The discussion around what constitutes the boundaries of Abstract Expressionism continues to recur despite decades-long attempts by revisionists. Most provocatively, Ann Gibson’s Abstract Expressionism: Other Politics (1997) demonstrates how women, artists of color, and queer artists were systemically left out of the canon. Two decades later, it has become de rigeur to call for the addition of these artists into exhibitions, but academic scholarship has lagged. Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, and Franz Kline remain the familiar anchors of Abstract Expressionism. Here at Stanford, The Anderson Collection showcases important works by the above-mentioned names yet there are many artists not currently a part of our permanent collection whose involvement in the movement has been omitted from the oft-repeated narratives of the period.

We celebrate the recent focus on women, on cultural inclusivity, on gender expansive dialogues and the move to allow a spectrum of identifications. The museum takes this opportunity to look in depth at black artists working abstractly at mid-century as a case study in order to nurture the growing scholarship in this area. How did the art praxis of African-American artists intersect with the overall Abstract Expressionist movement? How does African-American cultural production continue to undergird key fundamentals of mid-century abstraction? There were black Abstract Expressionists of both the first and second generation. Some showed at top-notch galleries associated with the Abstract Expressionist movement—Romare Bearden at Kootz Gallery and Norman Lewis at The Willard Gallery. Others such as Peter Bradley had advocates in the often denigrated figure of Clement Greenberg. This symposium aims to make visible these intertwined narratives in order to explore how blackness and the Abstract Expressionist movement have been tethered all along; but more often than not, their periodic overlapping aims tend to move between invisibility and hypervisibility depending on the needs of a public.

With a variety of programming over a two-day period, the Anderson Collection will work with scholars, professors, artists, musicians, collectors, and performers to open these topics up to wide discussion. The symposium will feature a keynote speaker, workshops, a live performance, and a conversation with contemporary black artists working in abstraction.

 

The two-day symposium is planned for January 27 and 28, 2017 at the Anderson Collection at Stanford University.

 

Interested participants are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 350 words along with a CV to andersoncollection@stanford.edu by October 10, 2016. Accepted participants will be notified by November 7, 2016. Presenters are invited to give papers suitable for 15- to 20-minute time slots.

The Anderson Collection at Stanford University is a world-class museum built around a permanent collection of 121 modern and contemporary American paintings and sculptures by 86 artists. As a center for research, scholarship, and appreciation of post-war and contemporary American art, the Anderson Collection works exemplify pivotal movements in modern art: Abstract Expressionism, Color Field Painting, Bay Area Figuration, California Light and Space, among others.

 

Organized by:

Andrianna Campbell, Doctoral Candidate, The CUNY Graduate Center

Jason Linetzky, Director, Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Aimee Shapiro, Director of Programming and Engagement, Anderson Collection at Stanford University

 

Collaborators include:

Jeff Chang, Executive Director, Institute for Diversity in the Arts, Stanford University

Richard Meyer, Professor of Art History, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University

Alex Nemerov, Department Chair, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University

Filmmakers Cheryl Dunye & Dee Rees @San Francisco State University (Sept. 23-24, 2016)

cheryl-dunye

Portrait of Cheryl Dunye (https://apps.chss.sfsu.edu/newsletters/thewatermelonwoman/index.html)

 

Black/Feminist/Lesbian/Queer/Trans* Cultural Production: A Symposium Honoring the 20th Anniversary of Cheryl Dunye’s “The Watermelon Woman”

This symposium honors the 20th anniversary of Cheryl Dunye’s film, “The Watermelon Woman” (1996). The first feature film directed by and starring a black lesbian, the production of this film marked a watershed moment for black cinema, feminist cinema, lesbian cinema, and new queer cinema. Appearing in the heyday of what filmmaker and scholar Yvonne Welbon has called the “golden age” of black queer cinema, the film garnered widespread critical acclaim, and its success inspired many black lesbians to create their own films in the years following. Her latest release, “Black is Blue” (2014) is a critically acclaimed narrative short film that follows the life of a black transgender man in Oakland, California. Dunye continues to break ground through complex filmic representations of the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. Thus, this conference honors Dunye’s growing body of work, as well as her cultural legacy.

dee-rees

Photo of Dee Rees (http://thefilmexperience.net/blog/2016/6/29/welcome-to-the-academy-683-of-you.html)

Dee Rees will be in conversation with Cheryl Dunye on Fri., Sept. 23, 2016 @7 p.m. Pacific Time at McKenna Theatre, Creative Arts Building, SFSU.

The Conference, sponsored by The College of Health and Social Sciences, Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality, Dean of the College of Health and Social Sciences, Dean of the College of Creative and Liberal Arts, Jamie and Phyllis Pasker Funds, Queer Cinema Institute at San Francisco State University, Watermelon Woman 3.0, and Black Sexual Economies Working Group (Washington University-St. Louis), is free and open to the public.

For more information on the symposium, please go to: Watermelon Woman Anniversary Symposium

On Cheryl Dunye’s Watermelon Woman: The Watermelon Woman

On Dee Rees, see: Dee Rees at IMDB.COM

Summertime — Genealogy Time

Art historian and visual cultural studies scholar Judith Wilson has brought our attention to the exhibition of a black woman’s portrait at the Middlesex County Historical Society in Connecticut.

This unattributed pastel on paper image (circa 1904) depicts Anna M. Warmsley (circa 1870s/1880s-1944). Warmsley (née Steadman [sp?]) lived in Middletown, Conn.

Judith saw Carla Halloway’s Facebook posting about this portrait last week. Ms. Halloway of East Hartford, Connecticut wrote that the portrait had been “rescued from the trash” and given to the historical society.

Ms. Halloway’s post generated a lively FB discussion, including comments from a descendant of Anna Warmsley and her husband Herbert Elmer Warmsley (1878/1881-1954). The historical society also has a portrait of Herbert Warmsley.

In  online public records (US Federal Census, etc.) and others on ancestry.com, the Warmsley’s family name sometimes appears as “Warmesley.” In early records, Anna is termed a “Negro” and Herbert, whose listed profession was a “galvanizer” in a foundry, a “mulatto.” Anna was a housekeeper for “a private family. She married Herbert when she was about 21. (No marriage certificate appears online. But the US Federal Census of 1910 states that they had been married for five years.)

Who might have painted the Warmsley couple around 1904? They were people of some means and were respected in their community. Did they commission their portraits? White or other non-black artists may have taken up this job. And what about the possibility that the portraits were done by one of the several East Coast artists of color whose names and works we know today?

John G. (Gwynne) Chaplin (1828-1907) worked in Pennsylvania and Ohio, and painted representational mythological and Biblical themes, and portraits. A man of mixed ethnicity–European-American and African-American–Chaplin traveled to Germany and had a studio in Dusseldorf before returning to the US to settle in Youngstown, Pennsylvania. (The actor Charlie Chaplin [1889-1977] was once told that he was related to the artist Chaplin.)

Black Hartford native Nelson E. Primus (1842-1916) made his reputation as a portraitist. But he moved to San Francisco in 1895, so it seems unlikely that he painted the Warmsleys.

Charles Ethan Porter (1847-1923) was a black artist from Hartford. Porter’s still lifes and realist landscapes were admired in the late 19th and early 20th century, and they’re sought after now by collectors of African-American artists’ production. His brushy style seems quite different from the linear approach of the Warmsley portrait. Sounds like a good time to return to the monograph exhibition catalogues on Porter by Helen Krieble et al. (1987) and the New Britain Museum of American Art (2008).

Annie E.A. Walker (1855-1929) was born in Brooklyn, and appears to have spent her younger years in Alabama and in Dallas, Texas. She studied at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, DC, and graduated from the Cooper Union School for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1895. (See this account of her Cooper Union years.) Afterward, she traveled to France and studied at the Academie Julian in Paris for several years. Her best known work is the Salon-exhibited pastel on paper called  La Parisienne (Howard University Art Gallery). She returned the US in the first decade of the 20th century and worked in Washington, DC. Her career and activities were researched by James V. Herring (1942), James A. Porter (1967), Lowery Sims (1978), Andrew Cosentino and Henry H. Glassie (1983), Tritobia Hayes Benjamin (1993), and others. Yet Walker is an artist about whom we don’t know enough. Works are attributed to her here and there, including in some files I haven’t looked at in years. Time to blow the dust off those. More to come…

Screen shot 2016-07-19 at 6.04.58 PM

 

JOB: Adjunct Faculty @ Tyler School of Art

Tyler School of Art is hiring adjunct faculty for fall 2016 and spring 2017 to teach Race, Identity, and Experience in American Art, a general education (Gen Ed) race and diversity class, typically taught by art historians but open to instructors in related fields or fine arts.

See more about the Gen Ed program here:  http://gened.temple.edu/
and Tyler School of Art here: http://tyler.temple.edu/#/prospective

More immediately, we plan to offer two online sections of this course this Summer I (class start date May 9) and welcome applications by instructors interested in building a teaching portfolio which includes online experience.  Additional professional development funds are available immediately for instructors who would teach online this summer and work in advance to develop the online iteration of this class.

Please send email of interest and CV to Jennifer Zarro at jzarro@temple.edu

 

REV: Kienholz’s Five Car Stud — anti-racism, 1969

Here’s the correct link:

Kienholz on view in London

On Five Car Stud by Ed Kienhilz

Review of Kienholz’s work, including the important anti-racist installation of 1969-72,
Five-Car Stud

CONF: Black Portraiture Revisited II – Feb. 19-20, 2016 @NYU

See Black Portraiture Conference @NYU Feb. 2016

The Art of Change: Conversations with Ford Foundation Fellows–Live Webcast, Fri., Jan. 15, 2016, 9am-5pm Eastern Time

Please join us for a live webcast of “The Artists of Change,” a daylong forum with our Art of Change Fellows—13 creative visionaries working at the forefront of art and social change. Over the course of the year, the Fellows have pursued independent projects on critical issues such as surveillance, climate change, drug policy and capitalism, soft power, diversity in the arts, social networks, and the power of technology. Tune in as they share their work and spark lively conversation—with the audience and each other—around the ideas they are exploring.

To watch the live webcast, visit artofchange.is.
Join the conversation: #ArtofChange

See The Art of Change Webcam 2016

Join the conversation with Eungie Joo, Thelma Golden, Carrie Mae Weems, Sandra Jackson-Dumont, and others.