EXH: Muslims in New York @ Museum of the City of New York

Muslims have been woven into the fabric of New York since the city’s origins as New Amsterdam, and the Museum is happy to share highlights from our collection which shed light on this deep history in our current exhibition, Muslim in New York. The size and diversity of New York’s Muslim community has continued to […]

via Muslim in New York: Highlights from the Photography Collection — MCNY Blog: New York Stories

EXH: “Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze” @ David Driskell Center, opens March 2nd

The David C. Driskell Center for the Study of the Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora at the University of Maryland, College Park is proud to announce its spring exhibition, Shifting: African American Women Artists and the Power of Their Gaze. The exhibition, organized by the Driskell Center, is curated by the David C. Driskell Center’s Executive Director, Professor Curlee R. Holton, assisted by Deputy Director, Dorit Yaron. The exhibition will be on display at the Driskell Center from Thursday, March 2, 2017 through Friday, May 26, 2017, with an opening reception on Thursday, March 2nd, from 5-7PM.

Q&A with Lubaina Himid–“Black British Art,” Then and Now

lubaina20himid20swallow20hard20the20lancaster20dinner20service202007-20courtesy20the20artist20and20hollybush20gardens-20photo20andy20keate

Lubaina Himid, The Rapid Effects of Abolition, from the Swallow Hard: The Lancaster Dinner Service series (2007), an assortment of overpainted plates, bowls and terrines at A-N.

Lubaina Himid is enjoying two one-artist exhibitions in the UK this year. Check out her interview with A-N and her piece in Frieze on her influences. About time!

lubaina-himid-mashulan

Lubaina Himid’s grandmother, MaShulan, photographed in Zanzibar in 1954, and reproduced as a poster for the exhibition ‘New Robes for MaShulan – Lubaina Himid, Work Past and Present’, Rochdale Art Gallery, 1987. Courtest: the artist at Frieze

 

 

John W. Mosley’s Mid-20th Century Photos of Black Philadelphia 

Check out @hyperallergic’s Tweet: https://twitter.com/hyperallergic/status/813744006114971648?s=09

EXH: “Spiritual Yards: Home Ground of Jamaica’s Intuitives – Selections from the Wayne and Myrene Cox Collection” @ National Gallery of Jamaica

The National Gallery of Jamaica is pleased to present Spiritual Yards: Home Ground of Jamaica’s Intuitives, which features selections from the Wayne and Myrene Cox Collection. The exhibition opens on Sunday, December 11, with the formalities starting at 1:30 pm, starting with opening remarks by Wayne Cox and followed by a musical performance by the […]

via “Spiritual Yards: Home Ground of Jamaica’s Intuitives – Selections from the Wayne and Myrene Cox Collection” Opens on December 11 — National Gallery of Jamaica Blog

Estamos contra el muro- A project by Sita Kuratomi Bhaumik opening 9.9.2016

A border is, at its core, a mechanism to produce and enforce difference–national, ethnic, racial, and social:

We Against the Wall — exhibition Southern Exposure gallery (San Francisco)

estamoscontraelmuro

Bhaumik’s work is social practice that embraces the political. Its institutional critique intersects with critical race art history’s concerns.

All Power to the People: Black Panthers @50: Exhibition, Anniversary Commemoration, and Symposium (Fall 2016) at the Oakland Museum of California

The Panthers, in more ways than one, sought to visualize racial identity. Their model continues to inform new movements across the globe.

Revolutionary Art (circa 1969) by Emory Douglas, Black Panther Minister of Culture, Oakland, CA.

posters-still.

See: Black Panther exhibition and programs at OMCA

CFP: Smack Mellon Call for emerging curators. Deadline: Sept. 1, 2016 — The Curator Ship

Proposals are accepted annually from Emerging Curators for the Emerging Artists Summer Exhibition. The Emerging Artists Summer Exhibition will be curated by a selected Emerging Curator and will be made up of Emerging Artists. An Emerging Curator is defined as an independent curator who is beginning their career as a curator. Proposal must show history […]

via Smack Mellon Call for emerging curators. Deadline: Sept. 1, 2016 — The Curator Ship

Call for Emerging Artists–Deadline Aug. 1, 2016

Screen shot 2016-07-22 at 1.23.33 PM

Tim Roseborough (and Cheryl Patrice Derricotte)  were the 2015 Emerging Artists at the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD), San Francisco.

 

For more information on the 2016 Emerging Artist Program at MoAD, click below:

The Emerging Artists program at the Museum of the African Diaspora, San Francisco

Screen shot 2016-07-22 at 1.31.24 PM

Cheryl Patrice Derricotte (and Tim Roseborough)  were the 2015 Emerging Artists at the Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD), San Francisco.

 

Click here to apply to the 2016 Museum of the African Diaspora Emerging Artist Program.

Summertime — Genealogy Time

Art historian and visual cultural studies scholar Judith Wilson has brought our attention to the exhibition of a black woman’s portrait at the Middlesex County Historical Society in Connecticut.

This unattributed pastel on paper image (circa 1904) depicts Anna M. Warmsley (circa 1870s/1880s-1944). Warmsley (née Steadman [sp?]) lived in Middletown, Conn.

Judith saw Carla Halloway’s Facebook posting about this portrait last week. Ms. Halloway of East Hartford, Connecticut wrote that the portrait had been “rescued from the trash” and given to the historical society.

Ms. Halloway’s post generated a lively FB discussion, including comments from a descendant of Anna Warmsley and her husband Herbert Elmer Warmsley (1878/1881-1954). The historical society also has a portrait of Herbert Warmsley.

In  online public records (US Federal Census, etc.) and others on ancestry.com, the Warmsley’s family name sometimes appears as “Warmesley.” In early records, Anna is termed a “Negro” and Herbert, whose listed profession was a “galvanizer” in a foundry, a “mulatto.” Anna was a housekeeper for “a private family. She married Herbert when she was about 21. (No marriage certificate appears online. But the US Federal Census of 1910 states that they had been married for five years.)

Who might have painted the Warmsley couple around 1904? They were people of some means and were respected in their community. Did they commission their portraits? White or other non-black artists may have taken up this job. And what about the possibility that the portraits were done by one of the several East Coast artists of color whose names and works we know today?

John G. (Gwynne) Chaplin (1828-1907) worked in Pennsylvania and Ohio, and painted representational mythological and Biblical themes, and portraits. A man of mixed ethnicity–European-American and African-American–Chaplin traveled to Germany and had a studio in Dusseldorf before returning to the US to settle in Youngstown, Pennsylvania. (The actor Charlie Chaplin [1889-1977] was once told that he was related to the artist Chaplin.)

Black Hartford native Nelson E. Primus (1842-1916) made his reputation as a portraitist. But he moved to San Francisco in 1895, so it seems unlikely that he painted the Warmsleys.

Charles Ethan Porter (1847-1923) was a black artist from Hartford. Porter’s still lifes and realist landscapes were admired in the late 19th and early 20th century, and they’re sought after now by collectors of African-American artists’ production. His brushy style seems quite different from the linear approach of the Warmsley portrait. Sounds like a good time to return to the monograph exhibition catalogues on Porter by Helen Krieble et al. (1987) and the New Britain Museum of American Art (2008).

Annie E.A. Walker (1855-1929) was born in Brooklyn, and appears to have spent her younger years in Alabama and in Dallas, Texas. She studied at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, DC, and graduated from the Cooper Union School for the Advancement of Science and Art in 1895. (See this account of her Cooper Union years.) Afterward, she traveled to France and studied at the Academie Julian in Paris for several years. Her best known work is the Salon-exhibited pastel on paper called  La Parisienne (Howard University Art Gallery). She returned the US in the first decade of the 20th century and worked in Washington, DC. Her career and activities were researched by James V. Herring (1942), James A. Porter (1967), Lowery Sims (1978), Andrew Cosentino and Henry H. Glassie (1983), Tritobia Hayes Benjamin (1993), and others. Yet Walker is an artist about whom we don’t know enough. Works are attributed to her here and there, including in some files I haven’t looked at in years. Time to blow the dust off those. More to come…

Screen shot 2016-07-19 at 6.04.58 PM