A Digital Humanities Project: The Fashion and Race Database — Art History Teaching Resources

During the first four years of teaching at The New School as a fashion studies scholar and a professor of color, I was faced with a challenge: there was a dearth of historical and pedagogical resources for exploring fashion history and theory outside of the Western canon–particularly when it came to how race has influenced aesthetics…

via A Digital Humanities Project: The Fashion and Race Database — Art History Teaching Resources

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Job Opportunity: Senior Digital Content Manager, Whitney Museum of American Art (Apply by Jan. 12, 2018)

The Senior Digital Content Manager at the Whitney Museum of American Art oversees the design, development and implementation of content strategies for the Museum’s digital platforms. The role is managerial and editorial in nature and develops digital project briefs and requirements, oversees content generation, and coordinates both internal and external production teams. The position’s primary objective is to use digital initiatives to increase engagement, both online and onsite, with the Whitney’s programming, mission and brand. As the lead liaison with Museum stakeholders, the role requires exceptional project management, storytelling, editorial, and digital experience-design skills.

 

 Responsibilities

  • Strategize and develop content across the Museum’s digital platforms.
  • Establish and maintain best practices for publishing on whitney.org, as well as other digital platforms, ensuring optimal usability, accessibility, and a consistent institutional voice across media.
  • Serve as editor for web copy, including website nomenclature, and exhibition and institutional announcements.
  • Serve as the primary project manager for all high-profile digital initiatives working closely with stakeholders throughout the Museum.
  • Oversee the development of digital requirement briefs, and manage budgets and timelines.
  • Oversee the production of video and audio content, ensuring a polished, consistent product; working with stakeholders to ensure success of livestreams of programs and events.
  • Produce institutional storytelling products, including the Whitney Stories series: conduct interviews, manage the editorial process, gather assets, and supervise outside contractors.
  • Oversee the Museum’s digital signage system and manage related contractor relationships.
  • Together with the Museum’s Digital Producer, manage website content via the Museum’s content management system, proofing and editing text for proper grammar and institutional style, and coordinating content with stakeholders throughout the Museum.
  • Work with Rights and Reproductions manager to obtain images and rights for content development and media production, as needed.

 

Requirements:

  • B.A.
  • 3–5 years professional digital content management or production experience.
  • Exceptional storytelling and production skills across media and platforms.
  • Strong background in planning and execution of media and technology initiatives, design thinking a plus.
  • Strong editorial skills, with a keen eye for consistency, accuracy, and detail.
  • Strong interpersonal skills and professional maturity in working with internal clients in a museum environment; ability and desire to communicate clearly about digital initiatives with non-technical staff.

 

Please send resume, cover letter and salary requirements to:  hr@whitney.org and write “Senior Digital Content Manager” in the subject line.  Deadline for submission is January 12, 2018.

 

 

About the Whitney:

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for 86 years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.

 

The Whitney Museum of American Art is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The Museum does not discriminate because of age, sex, religion, race, color, creed, national origin, alienage or citizenship, disability, marital status, partnership status, veteran status, gender (including gender identity), sexual orientation, or any other factor prohibited by law. The Museum hires and promotes individuals solely on the basis of their qualifications for the job to be filled. The Museum encourages all qualified candidates to apply for vacant positions at all levels. This description shall not be construed as a contract of any sort for a specific period of employment.

How Ya Like Me Now?

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Last week The Guardian reported on this ridiculously dumb blunder (a euphemism for what it really was).

Richard Dyer, more than twenty years ago, wrote about the position of whiteness as the norm, and this incident reminds us that theories trickle down at variable rates.

Hard not to think of David Hammons’ bitingly incisive  How Ya Like Me Now? (1988), a piece that generated its own complicated response. As is the case with so many Hammons’ projects, How Ya Like Me Now?  seems to speak to our moment, too.

New ACRAH website feature!

The Association of Critical Race Art History (ACRAH) is excited to announce a new feature on our website: a bibliographic resource devoted to issues of race, ethnicity, art, and visual culture. Please visit Bibliographies to view.

In conjunction with the launch of this resource, a series of reading groups are being organized in New York, the Bay Area, Washington D.C., and Boston. The primary purpose of these groups are to give area scholars an opportunity to discuss key texts pertaining to the visualization and representation of races and the project of racialization in art and visual culture. If you are interested in participating in an established group, or would like to start a group in your area, please visit Reading Groups for additional information.

 

 

 

 

DIGITAL: First Blacks in the Americas: The African Presence in The Dominican Republic — African Diaspora, Ph.D.

New Digital Project: First Blacks in the Americas:

via DIGITAL: First Blacks in the Americas: The African Presence in The Dominican Republic — African Diaspora, Ph.D.

Live: Conversations about Race at Stanford

Tomorrow (Nov. 19, 2015) starts at 12:30 PM Pacific

The first half of the symposium will feature a conversation from 12:30 to 2 pm PST about Policing, Mass Incarceration & Racial Justice with Mychal Denzel Smith (The Nation), Rinku Sen (Colorlines), Isabel Garcia (Derechos Humanos) and Reverend Osagyefo Sekou (Fellowship of Reconciliation & King Research and Education Institute). Moderated by H. Samy Alim.

The second half of the symposium will feature a conversation from 2:30 to 4 pm PST about The Arts, Racial Justice & Cultural Equity with Favianna Rodriguez (CultureStr/ke), Jasiri X (1Hood), Jonathan Calm (Stanford Department of Art & Art History), Deborah Cullinan (Yerba Buena Center for The Arts), and Rita Gonzalez (Los Angeles County Museum of Art). Moderated by Jeff Chang.
Here’s the URL again:

Call for Submissions: Mirror of Race

Mirror of Race (http://mirrorofrace.org) is seeking submissions of artwork and essays for online publication.

The goal of MoR is to explore ideas about race in the United States through personal and critical reflections on early photography. The editorial board encourages submissions from artists, writers, educators, curators, and scholars that engage with the photographs in the MoR online exhibition, that situate images within their historical contexts, and that can inspire visitors to the website to reexamine their own ways of seeing race. MoR aims to address the general public as well as instructors and students at all educational levels.

Submissions to MoR are peer reviewed by members of the editorial board and external readers. A list of suggested formats and topics can be found on the MoR website. Essays should adhere to the standards of excellence in the author’s field, but they should be written in accessible language for the MoR’s broad audience. They may address any aspect of race, including contemporary topics, but must engage in some way with the images in the MoR online exhibition. Artwork may include original photographs, paintings, poetry, storytelling, and other creative forms that can be exhibited online. Artists should provide a narrative explaining the relationship between their work and the images and themes featured on the MoR website.

For more information please contact Gregory Fried, Mirror of Race Project Director, gfried@suffolk.edu

 

WEB: Visual Culture of the American Civil War

#ADPhD

New website:

The historical record of the American Civil War includes a vast amount of visual material—photographs, illustrated news periodicals, comic publications, individually-published prints, almanacs, political cartoons, illustrated envelopes, trade cards, greeting cards, sheet music covers, money, and more. The era’s visual media heralded an unprecedented change in the production and availability of pictorial media in everyday life and an innovation in the documentation of warfare. In the last decade, a remarkable amount of these materials, previously confined to libraries, historical societies, and museums, has become available on the Web, and in the last generation drawn the attention of humanities scholars.

In July 2012 the American Social History Project held a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute on The Visual Culture of the Civil War. For two weeks, thirty college and university teachers from across the United States explored the array of visual media that recorded and disseminated information…

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