JOB: Visiting Assitant Professor, American art and architecture @ Smith College

The Department of Art at Smith College invites applications for a two-year Visiting Assistant Professorship in American art and architecture, to begin in July 2018. We seek someone with interdisciplinary interests who can teach introductory and intermediate undergraduate courses across the entire chronological spectrum of American art and architecture as well as advanced courses in their area of specialization. Candidates with a proven track record in engaging with issues of race and immigration in scholarship and teaching are especially encouraged to apply. A Ph.D. in Art or relevant field is expected by the time of appointment and evidence of independent teaching experience is required. Candidates from groups underrepresented in Art History are encouraged to apply.

Located in Northampton, MA, Smith College is the largest women’s college in the country and is dedicated to excellence in teaching and research across the liberal arts. A faculty of outstanding scholars interact with students in small classes, as advisors, and through student-faculty research projects. The College is a member of the Five College Consortium with Amherst, Hampshire and Mt. Holyoke Colleges, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Students cross-enroll and faculty cross-teach across the Five Colleges. Details about the Department of Art may be found at https://www.smith.edu/academics/art/.

Submit application at http://apply.interfolio.com/49145 with a cover letter, curriculum vitae, and three confidential letters of recommendation. Review of applications will begin on March 15, 2018.

Diversifying the student body, faculty, administration, staff, and curriculum is crucial to the mission of and vision for the College. We are committed to providing access and reasonable accommodation in the application process for individuals with disabilities and encourage applicants to request any needed accommodation(s). We value and are committed to a host of diverse populations and cultures, including, but not limited to, those based on ability, age, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, and veteran status.

Smith College is an EO/AA/Vet/Disability Employer. Women, underrepresented racial groups, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

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Race and American Visual Culture seminar @ American Antiquarian Society

2017 Center for Historic American Visual Culture (CHAViC) Summer Seminar

In Black and White: Race and American Visual Culture

American Antiquarian Society

Dates of Seminar: June 9-13, 2017

Applications Due: March 15, 2017

The 2017 CHAViC Summer Seminar at the American Antiquarian Society will explore how American visual culture expressed ideas about race, specifically blackness and whiteness, across the long nineteenth century. Through lectures, readings, hands-on workshops, and group research, participants will learn how popular forms of visual culture have constructed racial identities in the United States and how looking can function as a racialized practice. The seminar leader will be Tanya Sheehan, associate professor and chair of the Art Department at Colby College and editor of the Archives of American Art Journal at the Smithsonian Institution. Guest faculty will include Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor, assistant professor in the History Department at Smith College and Jasmine Nichole Cobb, assistant professor in the Department of African & American Studies at Duke University.

Participants will have the opportunity to learn from the extraordinary collections at AAS, including popular prints, political cartoons, photographs, illustrated books and periodicals, sheet music, and ephemera such as trade cards. Case studies may include: caricatures of African Americans in Edward Clay’s lithographic series Life in Philadelphia (1828-1830), the visual culture of blackface minstrelsy and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), graphics from popular periodicals like Harper’s Weekly that picture racial politics at key moments in U.S. history, efforts to recreate the “image of the black” by African American writer Phillis Wheatley and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, fantasies of racial difference in illustrated children’s books and commercial trade cards, and efforts to visualize raced bodies in early photographic portraiture. There will be a field trip to the Museum of African American History in Boston to view the exhibition Picturing Frederick Douglass.

The seminar will be held from Friday, June 9, through Tuesday, June 13, 2017, at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. Participation is intended for college and university faculty as well as graduate students and museum professionals.

For further information, syllabus, and application materials, please consult the AAS website at www.americanantiquarian.org/2017-chavic-summer-seminar

 

New ACRAH website feature!

The Association of Critical Race Art History (ACRAH) is excited to announce a new feature on our website: a bibliographic resource devoted to issues of race, ethnicity, art, and visual culture. Please visit Bibliographies to view.

In conjunction with the launch of this resource, a series of reading groups are being organized in New York, the Bay Area, Washington D.C., and Boston. The primary purpose of these groups are to give area scholars an opportunity to discuss key texts pertaining to the visualization and representation of races and the project of racialization in art and visual culture. If you are interested in participating in an established group, or would like to start a group in your area, please visit Reading Groups for additional information.