Symposium: Association of Historians of American Art (Oct. 14-15, 2021)

Registration is now open for AHAA’s Sixth Biennial Symposium (October 14–15, 2021), a virtual event. Register now!

The Association of Historians of American Art, one of the oldest membership organizations devoted to studying American art, will hold its biennial symposium in fall 2021. Jointly organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the University of Maryland, this event will celebrate the fortieth anniversary of AHAA (2020) and the fiftieth anniversary of the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s preeminent fellowship program.

The two-day symposium on Thursday, October 14 and Friday, October 15 will feature presentations of new research, roundtable discussions, and Q&A sessions. While the symposium itself will be virtual, the schedule has been planned to allow for maximum discussion and interaction amongst our members. An optional Saturday schedule will also include in-person tours of exhibitions at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and David C. Driskell Center, University of Maryland, and a cocktail reception in downtown Washington D.C.

Registration Instructions
Registration for the symposium is free, but an active membership in AHAA is required to watch all pre-recorded presentations and attend all live virtual events. AHAA offers several levels of membership: Student/Basic ($35), Member ($50), Supporter ($200), Lifetime (one-time payment of $500), and Institutional ($500). To learn more about becoming a member, please visit AHAA Membership.

We apologize that our website does not offer the capability of joining or renewing your membership and registering for the symposium in a single transaction. Instead, you will have to join or renew your membership FIRST and then register for the symposium. Visit this link to join AHAA or renew your membership. Once you have verified your membership status, please click here to register for the symposium.

If you would like to watch ONLY the keynote lecture (through a pre-recorded presentation and a live Q&A on Friday, October 15, from 4:30–5:00), you are welcome to do so without becoming a member of AHAA. To register for this single event only, please click here.

Symposium Schedule
Please note that all recorded presentations will be available to registered attendees on Monday, October 4, 2021. Attendees are invited to watch these presentations in advance of the live discussions scheduled below. All times listed below are EST.

Thursday, October 14 (virtual)
9:30 – 10:15am: Session I: Lightning Round (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Joshua Shannon, University of Maryland

Katherine Fein, Columbia University
“Tusk, Breast, and Skin: The Intimate Ecologies of Ivory Miniatures”

Lucy Mounfield, University of Nottingham
“’Quiet Good for an Amateur!’: Vivian Maier, Amateurism, and the Photographic Periphery”

Danya Epstein, Southern Methodist University
“Back to the Future: Recursivity and Repertoire in the Work of Dennis Numkena”

Emma Silverman, National Park Service
“What a Doll: Queering the Body in Greer Lankton’s Photographs”

11:30am – 12:15pm: Session II: Health and the Body (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Tess Korobkin, University of Maryland

Caitlin Beach, Fordham University
“Edmonia Lewis and the Poetics of Plaster”

Kristin Nassif, University of Delaware
“Blinding Sight: Vision and Spectacles in John Haberle’s Trompe l’Oeil Paintings”

Janine DeFeo, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
“Body and Self: Adrian Piper’s Food for the Spirit and the Discourses of Anorexia Nervosa”

1:15 – 1:45pm: Session III: New Perspectives on Portraiture and Still Life (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Nika Elder, American University

Lea Stephenson, University of Delaware
“Tactile Gestures and Embodied Objects: Newport Portraiture and Landscapes of Slavery”

Stephen Mandravelis, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
“Towards a Reconsideration of Charles Bird King”

2:30 – 3:00pm: Session IV: Curatorial Landmarks (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Curlee R. Holton, David C. Driskell Center, University of Maryland

Maya Harakawa, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
“Romare Bearden’s Harlem Exhibition, 1966-1967”

Danielle O’Steen, Kreeger Museum
“Lou Stovall in Washington: On the Craft of Screenprinting”

4:15 – 5:00pm: Session V: Digital Epistemologies (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Melanee Harvey, Howard University

Kay Wells, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
“Inventing Digital Humanities through the Index of American Design”

Laura Smith, Michigan State University
“Relational Landscapes: Teaching Chaco Canyon with Immersive Technology”

Karen Mary Davalos, University of Minnesota
Constance Cortez, University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley
“Decolonizing American Art History through Digital Humanities”

Friday, October 15, 2021 (virtual)
9:30 – 10:15am: Session VI: Iconographies of Ethnicity (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Grace Yasumura, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Patricia Johnston, College of the Holy Cross
“‘I’ is for ‘Italian’: Francis W. Edmonds and the Image Peddler in Nineteenth-Century American Visual Culture”

Erika Pazian, University of Minnesota Duluth
“In the In-Between: Las Poblanas and the Gendered Occupation of Space in Nineteenth-Century North America”

Colleen Stockmann, Gustavus Adolphus College
“Weeds and Wildflowers: Drawing Plant Politics in New York, 1850-1870”

10:45 – 11:45pm: Session VII: Iconoclasm (LIVE ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION)
Co-Chairs: Wendy Bellion and Jennifer Van Horn, University of Delaware
Dana Byrd, Bowdoin College
Ellery Foutch, Middlebury College
Philippe Halbert, Yale University
J. M. Mancini, Maynooth University, Ireland
John Ott, Boston University/James Madison University

1:00 – 1:45pm: Session VIII: Imperialism (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Leslie Ureña, National Portrait Gallery

Maggie Cao, University of North Carolina
“Oceanography and Imperialism in Homer’s Gulf Stream”

Ellen Tani, Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, National Gallery of Art
“Enmeshed: Senga Nengudi’s Performative Nylon Sculptures and Afro-Asian Ritual”

Mallory Nanny, Florida State University
“An-My Lê’s Small Wars: Re-enacting Memories of an Ongoing War”

2:45 – 3:30pm: Session IX: A Land Acknowledgement is Not Enough: Why Indigenous Art Must Guide a New American Art (LIVE ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION)
Mindy N. Besaw, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (Session Co-Chair)
Ashley Holland (Cherokee Nation), Art Bridges Foundation (Session Co-Chair)
Wanda Nanibush (Anishinaabe-kwe), Art Gallery of Ontario
Georgiana Uhlyarik, Art Gallery of Ontario

4:30 – 5:00pm: Keynote (LIVE Q&A)
Moderated by Jordana Saggese, University of Maryland and Symposium Co-Chair

Jennifer A. González, University of California, Santa Cruz
“Speech and Silence”

5:15 – 6:15pm: Virtual Reception

CFP: “South and North American Positionalities: Representing the Other in the Interdisciplinary 19th century [CAA 2022]–proposals due by Sept. 16, 2021

“South and North American Positionalities: Representing the Other in the Interdisciplinary 19th century”

The representation of the Other has been prioritized through the study of the cross-Atlantic relationship between Europe and the Americas; examples of exhibitions and publications include, Ojos británicos: Formación de la imagen visual de Colombia en el siglo XIX (Museo Nacional de Colombia, 2003) and Ana Lucía Araujo´s book, Brazil through French Eyes: A Nineteenth-Century Artist in the Tropics (2015). Research on the long nineteenth-century has focused on the connections between North and South America through scholarship like Katherine Manthorne’s landmark study Tropical Renaissance: North American Artists Exploring Latin America, 1839-1879 (1989), Picturing the Americas: Landscape Painting From Tierra Del Fuego to the Arctic (2015) and Traveler artists: Landscapes of Latin America from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection (2015). These studies have focused mainly on landscape representation through the eyes of the traveler.

This panel seeks to build upon the representation of the Other through visual culture and through an interdisciplinary lens. Interdisciplinary fields may include visual and textual relations, print culture, photography, theater studies, science and art, and material culture. A key point of discussion around the South and North two-way relationship will be structures of power and inherent biases of positionality. The Other in this proposal is understood within the nineteenth-century context as “different.” In this specific history, difference can be viewed not only through geographical distance but also through ethnographic distance. Questions of positionality may also address contemporaneous and historiographic accounts of audience reception and ideological interpretation of representations of the Other across the South-North divide. 


Topics may include but are not restricted to:

Travel/travelogues

Race

Ethnicity

Indigeneity

Gender

Age

Class

Spirituality

Religion

Politics

Nature

Landscape

Animals

Submission of proposals should be sent to: v.uribe20@uniandes.edu.co. Proposals must include 250-word abstracts and shortened CV sent by September 16, 2021. 

CFP: Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art (CAA Chicago, 2022)–proposals accepted through Sept. 16, 2021

Maria Elena Buszek (CU Denver) and Johanna Gosse are co-chairing an in-person session on contemporary art, music, and politics at the 2022 CAA conference in Chicago (February 16-19, 2022). Buszek and Gosse are very open to proposals that expand the conventional scope of “art history” and the panel might expand into two sessions.


To apply, send us a 250-word abstract, a shortened CV (under 2 pgs), and a completed proposal submission form to maria.buszek@ucdenver.edu and johannagosse@gmail.com by September 16. We will notify participants by September 23.

DESCRIPTION
Signs o’ the Times: Music and Politics in Contemporary Art


Scholar Bernard Gendron has compellingly argued that rock music took over the avant garde in the 1970s, holding “onto its ‘pop’ moorings while becoming ‘art.’” Visual artists like Laurie Anderson and William Pope L. started writing, performing, and recording music, and performers like Grace Jones, DEVO, and Die Tödliche Doris treated their music as performance art, blurring the lines between popular music and visual art in ways that have profoundly affected contemporary art ever since. This seemingly effortless crossing of the era’s art/music and high/low divides was in reality born of struggles that often sprang from the era’s civil rights and liberation movements, which in the ‘70s sought new ways to reach broader audiences and to critique the myopia or elitism of these movements’ earlier iterations. This tendency continues today in the work of contemporary artists who engage with popular music, not just as an index of contemporaneity, but as a rich archive of cultural and political significance, as well as formal and aesthetic inspiration and exchange.
This panel seeks to convene new approaches and perspectives on the intersection of art and popular music since the tail end of the sixties up to the present day. We’re particularly interested in work that examines cultural politics alongside formal concerns, while moving beyond the exhausted modernist preoccupation with policing the high/low divide.
For more information on the conference and how to submit your abstract see: https://caa.confex.com/caa/2022/webprogrampreliminary/meeting.html 

Opportunity: Assistant Professor, Pre-Modern Art History, University of Chicago

Assistant Professor – Pre-Modern Art History

https://apply.interfolio.com/91489

Open Date

Aug 10, 2021

Deadline

Oct 14, 2021 at 11:59 PM Eastern Time

 

Description

The Department of Art History at the University of Chicago invites applications for an appointment at the rank of assistant professor with an expected start date of July 1, 2022, or as soon as possible thereafter.

The Department seeks applicants with innovative approaches to scholarship in art history, visual media or studies, and/or the built environment, an ambitious research agenda, and a commitment to developing pedagogical techniques for teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Scholars working in any pre-modern (before ca. 1850) period and any geographic area, with any theoretical or methodological focus are invited to apply. The position includes a normal teaching load of four courses per year, as well as commensurate advising and service responsibilities.

This search for an Assistant Professor is connected to a concurrent search for a Provost’s Postdoctoral Fellow (http://apply.interfolio.com/91491). We encourage all applicants to submit applications for both postings so that all available options may be considered for the selected candidate. 

Opportunity: Assistant Professor, Histories of African Art, African-American Art, and/or African Diaspora Arts and Visual Cultures, Department of Art History, UC-Berkeley

More info here:

https://aprecruit.berkeley.edu/JPF03107

LEC: Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900

Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900
Zoom Roundtables, Friday February 26 and March 5, 2021 from 5-7 PM UK time.
Organized by the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and the Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies at Durham University

What were the opportunities and limitations in late nineteenth-century Paris for artists (broadly defined) who were not white and male?

This pair of events brings together research presentations and roundtable discussion in response to passages from art historian Emily C. Burns’s book-in-progress, Performing Innocence: Cultural Belatedness and U.S. Art in Fin-de-Siècle Paris. Burns analyzes how the encounters in the French capital reshaped American culture, fueled by the idea that the US had no culture, no history, and no tradition. The sections were pre-circulated to participants and will be briefly summarized at the start of the Feb 26 event.

Friday, Feb 26

Emily C. Burns, Associate Professor of Art History, Auburn University / Terra Foundation Visiting Professor, University of Oxford
“Introduction: Race, Gender and Intermedia Art Practice in Transnational Paris, c. 1900”

Adrienne L. Childs, Associate, The Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, Harvard University
“Cordier’s Caryatids: Laboring Black Bodies and the Sumptuous Second Empire Interior”

Susan Waller, Professor Emerita, Department of Art & Design, University of Missouri, St. Louis / Adjunct Professor of Art History, Maine College of Art
“Muslim Models in Nineteenth-century Paris”

Kirsten Pai Buick, Professor of Art History, University of New Mexico
“Don’t Look Back: African and African Diasporic Entanglements with France”

Friday, Mar 5

Peter Gibian, Associate Professor of English, McGill University
“Elle s’affiche”: Women Performers Pushing the Limits—Daisy Miller, Virginie Gautreau [Mme. X], Isadora Duncan”

Juliet Bellow, Associate Professor of Art History, American University
“Rodin and Hanako: Behind the Mask”

Renée Ater, Provost Visiting Professor, Africana Studies, Brown University
“Meta Vaux Warrick in Paris, 1899-1902”

JOB: Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship

Applications are invited for the Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professorship for the 2021/22 academic year at Oxford University. This post, which is generously funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art, will be based in the History of Art Department (which is part of Oxford’s History Faculty) and is offered in association with a Visiting Fellowship at Worcester College.

This post provides an exciting opportunity to build on long-term research networks, encourage international collaboration, and inspire a new generation of American art academics and curators by further embedding the subject into Oxford’s research communities and its graduate and undergraduate curricula. The successful candidate will engage in advanced study and original research in the history of American art, give a series of four public lectures, and organise a study day. They will also teach one undergraduate and one graduate course, supervise a small number of Master’s theses, and contribute to the Department’s general teaching and administration.  

The successful candidate will hold a doctorate and teaching experience in a relevant field, have a strong research record and/or research potential with a reputation as an international authority within the specialism and a publication record at a standard that will contribute to and enhance the national and international profile of the History of Art Department and History Faculty.

Applications are particularly welcome from women and black and minority ethnic candidates who are under-represented in academic posts in Oxford.

The post is fixed term for 12 months (or until 31 August 2022 whichever is sooner). The deadline for applications is 12 noon (UK time) on Friday 11th December 2020. Interviews are expected to take place via Microsoft Teams at the beginning of January 2021.

https://my.corehr.com/pls/uoxrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.display_form?p_company=10&p_internal_external=E&p_display_in_irish=N&p_process_type=&p_applicant_no=&p_form_profile_detail=&p_display_apply_ind=Y&p_refresh_search=Y&p_recruitment_id=148382

Edmonia Lewis on The View — VARIETY . SPICE . LIFE

For Valentine’s Day, EL is part of the conversation on The View Here’s her Cupid Caught In A Trap (1872-76) SAAM

via Edmonia Lewis on The View — VARIETY . SPICE . LIFE

Giovanni Battista Piranesi. Awarded an NEH grant for 2019-2021 from the Division of Preservation and Access, The Digital Piranesi (digitalpiranesi.org) is based at the University of South Carolina (Columbia), where the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections owns a rare full 29-volume set of Piranesi’s complete works. Our project aims to make this interdisciplinary material accessible in a complete digital collection and, in an interactive digital edition, to illuminate and enact many of the graphic features of his innovative designs. A Ph.D. in a relevant discipline (including but not limited to Art History, History of Architecture, Classics, Comparative Literature, European History, Italian, Library and Information Science) is required to start work.

Please direct any questions to project PI Jeanne Britton: jbritton@mailbox.sc.edu

For the official job ad, and to apply, please see:

https://uscjobs.sc.edu/postings/57022

Luce Curatorial Fellowship at SAAM (Apply by July 15, 2019)

The Smithsonian American Art Museum seeks an outstanding emerging scholar of American art for a curatorial fellowship funded by the Henry Luce Foundation. Beginning in fall 2019, this two-year position, with a possible third-year renewal, will provide an invaluable professional development opportunity to a scholar interested in a curatorial career in an art museum. It will also support scholarly research on SAAM’s permanent collection, one of the largest and most inclusive collections of American art in the world. The selected fellow will work under the supervision of an experienced curator and in collaboration with a team of staff from various departments on a major project. The appointee will develop practical skills in all four areas of curatorial practice: research, exhibition development, collections management and planning, and public service. He or she will also participate fully in the intellectual life of the museum’s Research and Scholars Center, home of its research fellowship program and journal, American Art.

 

The ideal candidate will demonstrate scholarly excellence and promise in addition to a strong interest in a museum career. A PhD in art history within the last five years is preferred; however, the fellowship is open to individuals with other academic specialties, such as African American and Women’s Studies. Applications are requested from scholars whose interests and areas of expertise align with one of the museum’s collection strengths and current curatorial initiatives:

 

  • Sculpture: SAAM holds the largest collection of American sculpture in the world with deep strengths in 19th- and 20th-century bronze and marble sculpture and key holdings in works by Hiram Powers, Edmonia Lewis, Paul Manship, and Luis Jiménez. The fellow will work closely with the curator of sculpture to develop a major collections-based project and book tentatively titled, “Skin Deep: Race and American Sculpture.” This research project aims to use sculpture, with its intrinsic and enduring ties to the body, as a tool for charting shifting attitudes on race in American public life.
  • 20th-Century Art: The museum’s rapidly expanding holdings include in-depth collections of painting, photography, graphic art, Latinx art, African American art, sculpture, and time-based media. The fellow will work closely with SAAM’s curator of 20th-century art on research and planning for the reinstallation of the museum’s 20th-century collections. This project aims to articulate collection strengths as well as amplify the presentation of art and artists currently under-recognized within the museum’s holdings, including conceptual, performance, and feminist artists, as well as women and artists of color. The curatorial fellow will be a full member of the curatorial team planning the larger reinstallation and reinterpretation of the museum’s permanent collections.

Application deadline July 15, 2019. Read more about the fellowship and how to apply here: https://americanart.si.edu/about/careers/luce-curatorial-fellowship