JOB: Post-doc, Modern & Contemporary at Cleveland Institute of Art

The Liberal Arts Department at the Cleveland Institute of Art seeks qualified applicants to fill a one-year, non-ranked Faculty-in-Residence position teaching art history to begin in the 2020-21 academic year with the possibility for continuation into a full-time ranked faculty position. The committee will consider recent Ph.D graduates, as well as Ph.D (ABD) candidates who have completed their coursework, for this post-doctorate position.

The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) is a nonprofit, private college of art and design that offers BFA degrees in Animation, Ceramics, Drawing, Game Design, Glass, Graphic Design, Industrial Design, Illustration, Interior Architecture, Jewelry + Metals, Life Sciences Illustration/Biomedical Art, Painting, Printmaking, Photography/Video, Sculpture + Expanded Media, Transportation Design as well as “concentration” study through the Liberal Arts Department in Visual Culture and in Creative Writing.

The successful candidate for Academic Year 2020-2021 will teach a full course load. Teaching assignments will include both traditional and theme-based Art History survey courses covering ancient cultures to present day. The faculty-in-residence will also teach elective courses of their design in the history of modern and contemporary art, craft, design and/or media arts. This position offers a $35,000 stipend and a competitive benefits package, as well as an exemption from institutional service.

We seek candidates whose teaching and/or scholarship focuses on modern and contemporary art and includes critical theory and visual culture studies. An ideal candidate will also have familiarity with cross-cultural perspectives and non-western art history.

Preferred secondary areas of expertise include one or more of the following:

  • Moving image and interactive digital media such as video, gaming, or animation
  • Performance art, conceptual art, or socially-engaged practices
  • Contemporary issues relevant to art and design
  • Approaches to pedagogy and instruction that extend beyond Eurocentric models

Preferred Qualifications:

  • D. (in hand or ABD) in Art History
  • A record of publication in the field of expertise
  • Experience teaching Art History at the college level preferred
  • A commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the classroom and with colleagues

Applications received by May 22 will be given full consideration.

To apply for the position please send application materials to Rachael Sauber, Office of Academic Affairs, at rasauber@cia.edu.

Please submit the following materials in PDF format:

  1. A Cover Letter of no more than two double spaced pages detailing qualities the applicant brings to this position and outlining teaching and service, creative/scholarly practices, and other relevant experience
  2. A Curriculum Vitae
  3. A Teaching Statement of no more than two double spaced pages outlining pedagogical methods and with specific attention to the candidate’s commitments to diversity and inclusion in the classroom
  4. Contact information for three (3) references

Semi-finalist candidates will be interviewed via phone or teleconference. Three letters of recommendation will be required for candidates who progress. Finalists will be interviewed via teleconference or, if possible, campus visits in June, 2020. Finalists must be eligible to work in the United States on or before July 1, 2020.

The Cleveland Institute of Art is one of the nation’s leading independent colleges of art and design, is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and National Association of Colleges of Art and Design (NASAD), and a proud member of Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD). Since 1882, the college has been an educational cornerstone in Cleveland, Ohio, and produces graduates competitive as studio artists, designers, contemporary craftspeople, and educators. Instructors across the college embrace both theory and practice and engage with emerging technologies in cutting-edge facilities. CIA is also home to the Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque offering classic, foreign, and independent films 50 weekends of the year in the Peter B. Lewis Theatre, as well as the Reinberger Gallery, which presents exhibitions of internationally recognized artwork and educational opportunities along with literary readings and speaker events. It is centrally located in the heart of University Circle, a growing, vibrant and diverse center for education and the arts that is home to Museum of Contemporary Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Cleveland Institute of Music, and Case Western Reserve University.

The Cleveland Institute of Art is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, committed to building and sustaining a culturally and ethnically diverse campus environment, and to the principles that promote inclusion.

CIA is dedicated to excellence through diversity and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, sex, disability, sexual orientation, national origin, religion, marital status, gender identity, veteran status or any other non-job related criteria. CIA recognizes the importance of a multicultural community of students, faculty, and staff who seek to advance our commitment to diversity. We invite applications from individuals with diverse backgrounds and from those who have academic experiences with diverse populations. An offer of employment will be conditional upon background verification.

Mission: To cultivate creative leaders who inspire people, strengthen communities, and contribute to a thriving and sustainable economy through an innovative education in art and design.

 

AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Funded Study — Apply by Jun. 3, 2020

Slave Ownership and the National Portrait Gallery, London. New AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership studentship. Deadline 3 June 2020

Dear Colleagues,

Birkbeck and the National Portrait Gallery are pleased to announce the availability of a fully funded collaborative doctoral studentship through the REACH Consortium from October 2020 under the Arts and Humanites Research Council’s Collaborative Doctoral Partnership Scheme.

This project, Slave-ownership and the National Portrait Gallery, London,  examines the links between the National Portrait Gallery and historical transatlantic slavery. In particular, it seeks to understand the impact of wealth derived from slavery on its founders, donors, and the sitters represented in its portraits, thus acknowledging a history that has long remained hidden.

The project will be jointly supervised by Dr Sarah Thomas and Dr Lucy Peltz and the student will be expected to spend time at both Birkbeck and the National Portrait Gallery, as well as becoming part of the wider cohort of CDP funded students across the UK.

Project Overview 

The National Portrait Gallery (NPG) was founded in 1856 to collect portraits of those people who made a notable contribution to British history. By closely scrutinising the early history of one particular institution – its personnel, and the collecting choices of its trustees –through the lens of slave-ownership and its profits, this project will have broad implications for the wider museum sector, exploring in particular issues of national identity and the ethics of funding that have particular currency in today’s decolonising debates.

The studentship will offer access to the NPG’s expertise and collections, working with a range of colleagues under the direction of Dr Lucy Peltz, Head of Collection Displays (Tudor to Regency) and Senior Curator 18th Century Collections. This is a particularly timely moment for a research project of this nature as the Gallery will be in the process of developing Inspiring People, a major refurbishment and redisplay of its collection which will see the Gallery relaunch in 2023 as an exciting public cultural space in which to participate, challenge and debate British history, culture and contemporary life. Consequently, this research project’s focus and findings will contribute to the Gallery’s stated commitment to increasing institutional transparency and raising important questions about the legacies of empire in British society today.

Start date: 1 October 2020 [or later, depending on situation]

Application Deadline: Wednesday 3 June 2020, 2pm

Interviews will take place online on Tuesday 16 June, 2020

For further information and instructions on how to apply, see the document attached.

All best wishes,

Dr. Sarah Thomas 
Director, Centre for Museum Cultures
Birkbeck College
London WC1H 0PD

sarah.thomas@bbk.ac.uk
http://www.bbk.ac.uk/art-history/

Centre for Museum Cultures Website: http://www.bbk.ac.uk/museum-cultures/

CFP: “Towards a More Inclusive Digital Art History” (PANORAMA: JOURNAL OF THE ASSOCIATION OF HISTORIANS OF AMERICAN ART)

Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art invites submission of 500-word proposals for feature articles focused on Digital Art History to be published as part of the new initiative, “Towards a More Inclusive Digital Art History,” which is supported by a major grant from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Panorama (journalpanorama.org) is the first peer-reviewed, open-access, online publication dedicated to American art and visual culture (broadly defined). The Journal encourages a broad range of perspectives and approaches within an interdisciplinary framework encompassing both local and global contexts and is published by the University of Minnesota Libraries.

The goal of “Toward a More Inclusive Digital Art History” is twofold—to increase both inclusivity and access. First, in order to encourage a more comprehensive approach to the history of American art, we seek to publish digital art history scholarship that focuses on the contributions of constituencies that have historically been marginalized and/or under-researched, and to make this available worldwide, for free and with open access. Second, our priorities will be accessibility, manageability, and sustainability. To that end, we seek proposals, both collaborative and individual, from scholars with all levels of knowledge about the digital humanities and will prioritize supporting scholars who may have little or no institutional support for digital scholarship. We aim to provide a model for sustainable digital art history research that can be accessible to a wide range of scholars, including those who will need to learn digital humanities methods without institutionally provided technical assistance. We also encourage computational approaches to art-historical analysis that employ low-cost, open-source applications. In this way, the project will provide models for other scholars to emulate regardless of financial or institutional support. Finally, we plan to encourage the accessibility and sustainability of digital art history by doing something that is all-but unprecedented in the field: We will publish and preserve the datasets underlying scholars’ peer-reviewed research along with their articles and project narratives. This will enable other scholars to view and test the data on which the research is based and employ the data for their own teaching and research, thereby expanding the project’s reach.

Panorama invites submission of proposals for feature articles to be published as part of this new initiative, “Towards a More Inclusive Digital Art History.” Selected authors will be invited to participate in a Digital Humanities workshop in Washington, DC, in October 2020. This workshop will give participants the opportunity to develop their research projects with Panorama’s editorial team and experts in the field of digital publishing. The first article in this series will be published in 2021.

To submit a proposal, send your c.v. and an abstract of approximately 500 words that summarizes the topic of the proposed essay, how it represents scholarship on understudied areas of American art, and why it could benefit from a digital art historical approach. Authors do not need to identify precisely which digital methods they would like to use—this will be addressed at the workshop and determined in collaboration with Panorama editors. Instead, use the abstract to explain why the research questions addressed in the essay could benefit from—or even demand—a digital approach. The Terra Foundation has also provided some funding to support attendance at the Workshop, so please also let us know if you require assistance with accommodation and travel expenses.

Proposals should be sent to journalpanorama@gmail.com with the subject heading “Digital Art History CFP response” and are due April 15.

CFP: “Art and the Technicity of Race” (special issue of MEDIA-N: JOURNAL OF THE NEW MEDIA CAUCUS)

Megan Driscoll and Johanna Gosse are soliciting papers on “Art and the Technicity of Race.” Please see below.

Art and the Technicity of Race

A decade ago, Beth Coleman and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun introduced the concept of race and/as technology.* Turning to Heidegger’s notion of techne as prosthesis or skill, Coleman and Chun imagine race itself as a technology that can be leveraged, a tool for navigating systems of power. This distances race from its mythological status as biological fact, creating a critical framework that returns historical agency to the individual and helps us understand how race and ethnicity function in the visual–and technological–world.

Recently, the concept has received renewed attention as the intersections between race and ethnicity and the technological have come to the fore in popular discourse, raised by issues ranging from representation in film to bias in facial recognition. Critical work by scholars such as Simone Browne and Lisa Nakamura and the Precarity Lab has also continued to interrogate the technicity of race and its relationship to other technologies, both historical and contemporary. Artistic research and practice on the subject, however, has often been either neglected or instrumentalized as illustrative of a larger debate.

This special issue of Media-N responds to the urgent need to examine the state of dialogue on race and/as technology in art practice, history, and criticism. It will feature a ten years on reflection on the concept by Beth Coleman, opening discussion onto the way this framework has shaped, and has been shaped by, art of the past and present.

We seek contributions that explore how art sheds light not only on the relationship between race, ethnicity, and the technological, but on race itself as, in the words of Coleman, “a disruptive technology that changes the terms of engagement with an all-too-familiar system of representation and power” (178). Issues to consider include, but are certainly not limited to:

  • The impact of the race and/as technology hermeneutic on artistic research and practice of the past decade.
  • The influence of visual technologies and aesthetic practice on discourses surrounding sociohistorical concepts like blackness and brownness.
  • The imaging of historical and/or contemporary flows of migration and diaspora.
  • International communication media and tensions between the global/local.
  • The use of visual technologies to negotiate power between citizens and the state.
  • Light and color bias in the material/processes/procedures of photography, film, and digital media.
  • Bias and violence in both the inputs and outputs of artificial intelligence and machine learning.
  • Anxieties about race and visual truth sparked by technologies ranging from DNA testing to deepfakes.
  • Ethnicity and surveillance capitalism after 9/11 and/or the long tail of surveillance capitalism inaugurated under trans-Atlantic slavery and European colonialism.

Submissions addressing artistic practices from any time period or region are welcomed from scholars, critics, artists, designers, scientists, media-makers, and interdisciplinary researchers from across the humanities and sciences.

*See Beth Coleman, “Race as Technology,” Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture, and Media Studies 24, no. 1 (70) (May 1, 2009): 176-207; and Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, “Race and/as Technology, or How to Do Things to Race,” in Race After the Internet, eds. Lisa Nakamura, Peter Chow-White, and Alondra Nelson (New York: Routledge, 2012), 38-60.

=====

Media-N, Journal of the New Media Caucus (ISSN: 1942-017X) is a scholarly, invitational, and double blind peer-reviewed journal. The journal provides a forum for scholarly research, artworks and projects, and is open to submissions in the form of papers, reports, and reviews of exhibitions and books on new media art. Media-N is an English language journal, and all submissions must be received in English adhering to the standards set by the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style.

TIMELINE:

June 30, 2020: Deadline for submission of abstracts.

August 1, 2020: Notification of accepted proposals and invitation to submit paper.

December 15, 2020: Projected deadline for submission of final papers.

ABSTRACT GUIDELINES:

Please send your proposal by email with the following information combined into a single document:

-Proposal title, and a 300-500 word abstract, plus 1-2 images if desired.

-Please include your name, email, and title/affiliation on abstract.

-A condensed CV (no longer than 3 pages).

NOTE: Materials should be submitted in English, as a Word document or PDF.

File should not exceed 5MB.

SEND INQUIRIES & SUBMISSIONS TO:

Megan Driscoll, Special Issue Guest Editor: md@megandriscoll.net Johanna Gosse, Executive Editor: johannagosse@gmail.com

JOB: Asst Prof, Early Modern @ Kenyon College

The Department of Art History at Kenyon College is accepting applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Early Modern Art History. The appointment will begin in August 2020. Candidates should have expertise in the material culture of Early Modern Europe from the Baroque to the early Industrial Age. We seek a creative colleague who can immediately contribute to re-shaping the curriculum. Applicants must be interested in offering a fresh, global perspective on permanent courses, including the Survey of Art, and developing new courses at the introductory, intermediate, and advanced levels. We are interested in teacher-scholars who can offer creative ways to engage with the Department’s Visual Resources Center, our Study Collection, and regional art museums located in Columbus and Cleveland. Candidates’ teaching and research should emphasize an interdisciplinary perspective that demonstrates interest in connections between Europe, the Americas, Africa, and/or Asia. We particularly welcome candidates with expertise in one or more of the following areas: architecture, museums, and pre–1900 print culture, including photography, prints, and manuscripts. Applicants should complement, not duplicate, current expertise of the department. Applicants must be able to demonstrate excellence in teaching, with evidence of support for Kenyon’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. The candidate will have the opportunity to play a leadership role in the College’s study abroad program in Rome, Italy.

Qualifications: A completed Ph.D. in Art History is required. Experience teaching beyond graduate assistantships is strongly desired at the time of hire. The successful candidate will also demonstrate potential for active scholarly engagement within their field of expertise, and to perform service to the College and the profession. The selected candidate will be expected to contribute to one of the interdisciplinary concentrations at the College, such as African Diaspora Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and Women and Gender Studies, depending on their particular expertise and interest.

Duties: Teach 3/2 load undergraduate courses, including second half of the Survey of Art and intermediate and upper-level seminars on topics from the Baroque to the early Industrial Age. The selected candidate will also serve as an advisor and mentor to students, including potential independent study and honor’s theses across the college; maintain an active program of research/scholarship leading to peer-reviewed publication; and perform service to the department and college.

How to Apply: Applicants must submit a CV, cover letter, teaching philosophy, contact information for three references, and unofficial transcripts. For more information and to apply, visit www.kenyon.edu/directories/offices-services/human-resources/employment-opportunities/

Review of applicants begins January 15, 2020

Questions: Please direct questions to the search chair, Austin Porter, Assistant Professor of Art History and American Studies, at portera[at]kenyon.edu

JOB: Africa/African Diaspora @ Courtauld

The Courtauld Institute of Art seeks to appoint a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in the arts of Africa and/or the African diaspora, within the broad period from c. 1800 to the present. This appointment offers an exciting opportunity to transform The Courtauld’s teaching and research, and to provide academic leadership in fields of critical importance to the discipline, within and beyond the institute. It is one of two new posts in this broad field, the other being a Professorship.

We invite applications from early and mid-career scholars with a profile in research and teaching commensurate with their career stage.

These posts are part of The Courtauld’s commitment to a more inclusive and diverse curriculum. They are generously supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Application is online. You will also need to include a CV and a supporting statement of no more than 1500 words. You should also give the names of 3 referees.

The supporting statement should set out how you meet the criteria of this position, and include a brief statement about your research profile. This should include your current and future research plans, your teaching plans and experience, your administrative experience, and potential to contribute to the research profile and impact of The Courtauld. Please address the criteria set out in the Person Specification when preparing your statement.

Interviews for the position will take place on Thursday 5th and Friday 6th December 2019.

If you would like an informal conversation about the roles please contact Dr Jo Applin, Head of Art History. jo.applin@courtauld.ac.uk

https://jobs.courtauld.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=323

 

2020 RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP IN US ART at Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College (Winter Park, Florida) — Apply Now!

The Cornell Fine Arts Museum at Rollins College seeks a Research Fellow in American Art. This is part-time (20 hours/week), non-residential position funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to develop, research, digitize and display the American collection. The Research Fellow will work with the Bruce A. Beal Director and members of the curatorial team to conduct in-depth and contextual research. Twin goals are to help re-position the collection for a broader audience, with research (including images, provenance, exhibition history, artist biographies, interpretation and bibliography) made available online; and to integrate the collection with both the teaching mission of the museum and with contemporary efforts to refine and widen the definition of American art.

Eligible candidates will have expertise in American art (ABD required, Ph.D. preferred) with a preference for a research focus in the 19th or 20th century. Experience teaching at the college level or curatorial experience in a university art museum a plus. The fellowship is for a 12-month period starting in January 2020; apart from a few weeks in residence in Winter Park, research can be conducted in any city providing that the fellow has access to major research libraries for American art.

To apply, please visit the Rollins career page https://jobs.rollins.edu/en-us/job/492968/research-fellow-american-art.

Call for Research Notes: Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Call for Research Notes
Panorama: Journal of the Association of Historians of American Art

Panorama seeks short works of original scholarship that bring new research discoveries, new museum acquisitions, or developing projects (academic, curatorial, and/or digital) to the attention of its readers.

Research Notes are usually written in the first person, and you are encouraged to express you excitement in the first paragraph. Research notes are approximately 2,500 words in length, and they can include footnotes and up to five illustrations. We see Research Notes as an opportunity to surface those great moments when something new comes to light. 

For further information and to submit your Research Note, please consult our submissions page.

Feel free to send your questions to:
Katelynn Crawford: kcrawford@artsbma.org
Kevin Murphy: kmm3@williams.edu
Erin Pauwels: erin.pauwels@temple.edu

JOB: African/African Diaspora/Latinx or Latin American; Asst Prof @ USC

University of Southern California (CA) – TT Assistant Professor of African and/or African Diasporic and/or Latinx and/or Latin American History of Art, Visual, and/or Material Culture, post-1750

The Department of Art History in the Dana and David Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA) invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in African and/or African Diasporic and/or Latinx and/or Latin American history of art, visual, and/or material culture, post-1750. Applicants may conduct research in one or more of these areas, and various methodological and theoretical approaches are welcome. We have a particular interest in scholarship that contributes to increasing the diversity of the department’s intellectual life and offerings. This position is expected to begin August 2020.

The successful candidate will teach courses at the undergraduate and graduate level and participate actively in the intellectual life of the department and the university. Candidates must possess a Ph.D. at the time of appointment and show exceptional scholarly promise. Interested candidates should provide 1) a cover letter that includes a discussion of research and teaching, 2) a curriculum vitae, 3) two writing samples, at least one of which should be a chapter from a dissertation or book manuscript, and 4) the names and contact information of three referees who will be contacted in a system-generated email to provide letters. In order to be considered for this position, applicants are required to submit an electronic USC application; follow this job link or paste in a browser: https://usccareers.usc.edu/job/los- angeles/assistant-professor-of-african-and-or-african-diasporic-and-or-latinx-and-or-latin-american- history/1209/13261319 . For full consideration, applicants are encouraged to apply by November 1, 2019.

USC is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, protected veteran status, disability, or any other characteristic protected by law or USC policy. USC will consider for employment all qualified applicants with criminal histories in a manner consistent with the requirements of the Los Angeles Fair Chance Initiative for Hiring ordinance.

 

JOB: Asst Prof, Modern/Contemporary @ Boston College

The Art, Art History, and Film Department at Boston College invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor in the field of Modern and Contemporary Art of Europe and the Americas to begin July 1, 2020.

The department seeks candidates with robust and innovative research agendas and a commitment to undergraduate teaching. Applicants should specialize in 20th-century art and be able to teach courses that address art of the 21st century. The appointee will teach five courses each academic year, including an introduction to art history from the Renaissance to Modern and upper-level courses in the candidate’s areas of specialization. Of particular interest are candidates who can teach courses in one or more of the following areas: theory and methods of art history; history of architecture; and museum history, theory, and practice. The department also welcomes candidates whose research and teaching interests may include analysis of gender studies, critical race theory, post-colonial studies, and disability studies.

Faculty members have the opportunity to pursue exhibition projects at the McMullen Museum of Art and to incorporate Boston-area museums in their teaching. The department also encourages interdisciplinary instruction and teaching in the Core Curriculum.

Boston College is a Jesuit, Catholic university that strives to integrate research excellence with a foundational commitment to formative liberal arts education. The University encourages applications from candidates committed to fostering a diverse and inclusive academic community.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching philosophy, sample of recent scholarship, course syllabi, and three letters of recommendation by November 1, 2019. PhD expected by start date. All materials must be submitted to Interfolio: https://apply.interfolio.com/66288.