CFP: Caribbean Festival of Arts (Carifesta) at 50

The Inaugural Caribbean Festival of Arts as Prism: 20th Century Festivals in the Multilingual Caribbean
August 5-7, 2022 | Virtual

Call for Papers and Participation

Fifty years ago, the first Caribbean Festival of Arts (Carifesta), held in Guyana from August to September 1972, marked a significant and deliberate postcolonial moment that embodied the aspirations of a unified Caribbean. A brochure for the inaugural multidisciplinary and transnational festival stated that Carifesta would “depict the life of the people of the region—their heroes, morale, myth, traditions, beliefs, creativeness, ways of expression” and “stimulate and unite the cultural movement throughout the region.”

Carifesta ‘72 aspired to promote the cultural expressions of the multilingual region. The conceptualizers, who included celebrated poet and historian Kamau Brathwaite, poet and activist Martin Carter, and artist Aubrey Williams, expected that the organizing body would craft a festival that embraced and celebrated the multiracial and multicultural heritage of the region despite the polarized national politics of the day. This meant, in theory, celebrating traditions rooted in the indigenous nations, West Africa, India, Indonesia, China, and Western Europe.

What transpired when the artists, dancers, musicians, writers, directors, filmmakers, and revelers from across the circum-Caribbean and beyond gathered to exchange ideas and idioms, ancestral stories, and contemporary engagements with tradition? What were the ripple effects of the Carifesta ‘72 event on the region’s (festival) culture, politics, and people? What legacies did it build upon or interrupt?

As we approach the 50th anniversary of the first Carifesta (as well as Carifesta XV in Antigua & Barbuda in 2022), we invite scholars (including graduate students), artists, Carifesta ‘72 participants, and the Guyanese and Caribbean diaspora to participate in a three-day virtual symposium organized in association with the Guyana Cultural Association of New York, Inc. (GCA) as part of the 2022 Guyana Folk Festival.

We will examine the inaugural Carifesta, its significance, and its legacies. We will collectively explore its possibilities, achievements, and missteps. We will also use this seminal moment as a prism through which Caribbean culture, nationalism, transnationalism, and postcolonialism can be analyzed. We aim to harness the spirit of Carifesta ‘72 as a transnational and inclusive space to facilitate dialogue about Guyanese and Caribbean culture.

This symposium is a collaboration among GCA, the Asian American Studies Program of Binghamton University, Rice University, and Ohio University in the US; the University of Guyana, the Festival City Youth and Parents Organization, and the Moray House Trust in Guyana; and Guyana Speaks in the UK.

Festivals, by design, are ephemeral entities that take place at specific moments in time. The documents (e.g., pamphlets, brochures, performance guides, personal photographs) that are produced are often taken home by participants. The festivals remain in their memories. Thus, a goal of this symposium is to bring scholars and Carifesta ‘72 participants together to exchange knowledge and to document this festival, which remains in personal and collective memories. We aim to collect physical materials and oral histories to facilitate the creation of a digital archive that could expand to embrace other regional festivals.

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We invite proposals for four categories of presentations: (1) Contextualizing/Historicizing Carifesta ‘72, (2) Experiencing Carifesta ‘72, (3) The Legacies of Carifesta ‘72, and (4) Festival Methodologies. We welcome presentations from Guyanese, Caribbean, and transnational perspectives. We will accept proposals and presentations in all languages spoken in the Caribbean.

Possible topic areas for papers or presentations include but are not limited to:

• Contested visions, interpretations, experiences, and memories of Carifesta ‘72.

• Personal accounts and recollections from multimedia storytellers (e.g., singers, writers, filmmakers, dancers, oral historians, and visual artists).

• Case studies related to Carifesta ‘72 (e.g., African American participation or specific presentations or concerts).

• Similarities or differences between Carifesta ‘72 and earlier or contemporaneous festivals, including, but not limited to, national festivals (within the region), the Caribbean Festival (Puerto Rico 1952), the Commonwealth Arts Festival (Britain 1965), the First World Festival of Negro Arts (Senegal 1966), and the Second World Black and African Festival of Arts and Culture (Nigeria 1977).

• The role or place of Carifesta in the ecosystem of regional festivals.

• Intersectional identities and experiences of Carifesta. These include the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, class, and religion.

• The aspects of culture that were highlighted, identified, or invented as part of nationalist movements and identities in the decolonization era. What aspects of these cultures were chosen to represent a “nation” (from Guyana and Jamaica to Venezuela and Brazil) at Carifesta ‘72? Why did nations such as Peru and Mexico choose to participate?

• Approaches to understanding, contextualizing, historicizing, and/or theorizing the importance or centrality of festival culture in the Caribbean.

• The intertwining of (festival) culture and politics or the political. This can be a discussion of the use of (festival) culture in political organizing, especially regarding politics or the political in Carifesta.

• The role of (festival) culture in political, economic, cultural, and/or mental decolonization.

• Approaches for analyzing the performance of religious rites, rituals, and celebrations within the secular form of festivals such as Carifesta.

• The effects of festivals (and research about festivals) on methodology and disciplinary specificity.

• Theorizations about what can be gleaned from the history of pan-Caribbean exchanges such as Carifesta and/or about what has been silenced through their understudied nature.

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Please send submissions to CarifestaAt50@gmail.com by May 16, 2022.

For paper presentations, please send a 250-word abstract or description and a short biography.

For artist submissions, please send JPEG and/or MP3 or MP4 files and a short biography. Include the title, work date, process, dimensions, and medium. Dropbox and other FTP links will not be reviewed.

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Adrienne Rooney, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Art History, Rice University

Ramaesh Bhagirat-Rivera, Assistant Professor, Asian American Studies Program, Dept. of Asian & Asian American Studies

Vibert Cambridge, Professor Emeritus, School of Media Arts & Studies, Ohio University

JOB: Latin and/or Caribbean art and visual culture @ FIT

The History of Art Department seeks an historian of Latin and/or Caribbean art and visual culture who will develop and teach innovative historical surveys covering ancient to contemporary art from the region. Strong preference for candidates with museum or curatorial experience who can contribute to the department’s major, Art History and Museum Professions.

The successful applicant will also be expected to contribute new course offerings to the Liberal Arts minors in the History of Art, Latin American Studies, Caribbean Studies, and/or African American and Africana Studies, and to contribute to the department, School, and College beyond the classroom by participating in committees and college-wide events, engaging in scholarly activity through conference presentations and/or publications.

The new faculty member will benefit from mentoring by working with the department chair and with other department faculty, as well as with the Center for Excellence in Teaching, which anchors a faculty development program for training with online learning systems and for other pedagogical guidance.

See full description at https://fitnyc.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp;jsessionid=D2C059946E50A5D1165CAE4A2EE2B842?JOBID=136772

Deadline October 15, 2021.

CFP: “Colonial Caribbean Visual Cultures” special issue of Atlantic Studies: Global Currents

Special Issue: “Colonial Caribbean Visual Cultures”

This multidisciplinary collection will examine the creation and circulation of colonial visual cultures from the Caribbean during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The era of Caribbean slavery placed the islands at the centre of the production and movement of goods, ideas, money and peoples, as well as cultural conflicts, exchanges and hybridities which created new challenges for artists, and new ways of looking. As a cornerstone of European imperial expansion the Caribbean had an enormous imaginative influence on Europe and the wider world. Tropical vistas and diverse peoples provided new visual subjects, and the art of the Caribbean participated in the circum-Atlantic movement of aesthetics, ideas and images: from mid-eighteenth-century georgic scenes which attempted to reconcile beauty with enslaved labour, to the colonial picturesque of the 1790s which rearticulated metropolitan landscape visions, to the unique botanical and zoological images which emerged from natural histories and travel narratives, and latterly to the early photography which marketed the West Indies to potential tourists. Significantly, the collection will position African-Caribbean, maroon, and indigenous material cultures at the centre of its exploration of how Caribbean visual cultures were related to the ways of seeing associated with modernity.

This collection invites contributors from history of art, literature, anthropology, history and geography and other disciplines to focus their attention on the specific dynamics of Caribbean visual cultures. What ways of seeing emerge under the conditions of slavery? How were images and objects produced, circulated and consumed in the colonial context? What were the relationships between text and image in pre-disciplinary forms such as the travel narrative? How did visual cultures operate across the heterogeneous cultures and geographies of the Caribbean islands? What were the relationships between colonial and metropolitan aesthetic images and practices? By focusing on the Caribbean islands and the circum-Atlantic production of imagery which they engendered, the essays in this volume will open up alternate genealogies and geographies for Caribbean art and ideas about the visual that are central to the emergence of colonial modernity.

Topics might include:

  • Circum-Atlantic aesthetics and the relationships between metropolitan and colonial visual forms;
  • Transnational contexts and intersections between empires;
  • Colonial ways of seeing and visual production under slavery;
  • Ways of disaggregating the ‘colonial gaze’;
  • Intersections between text and image;
  • Indigenous, slave and maroon cultures;
  • The visual representation of indentured labourers from Asia;
  • The impact of Caribbean visual cultures on those of Europe;
  • Natural history, science and medicine; travel narratives and other pre-disciplinary forms;
  • How objects shift through value systems, functions and contexts,
  • Ideas of vision in the context of colonial modernity.

Successful essays will be included in a special issue of Atlantic Studies: Global Currents

Please submit a 500-word abstract and a brief cv by 15 March 2017 to Emily Senior and Sarah Thomas: e.senior@bbk.ac.uk; sarah.thomas@bbk.ac.uk

Deadline for full scripts will be 15 November 2017

DIGITAL: First Blacks in the Americas: The African Presence in The Dominican Republic — African Diaspora, Ph.D.

New Digital Project: First Blacks in the Americas:

via DIGITAL: First Blacks in the Americas: The African Presence in The Dominican Republic — African Diaspora, Ph.D.

CONF: Sustainable Art Communities: Creativity and Policy in the Transnational Caribbean @ INIVA, London, Dec. 3 & 4, 2013

‘Sustainable Art Communities: Creativity and Policy in the Transnational Caribbean’ is a two-year international research project that explores how the understanding and formation of sustainable community for the Caribbean and its global diaspora may be supported by art practice, curating and museums. The project fosters networks of exchange and collaboration among academics, artists, curators and policymakers from the UK and the Netherlands, as well as various countries in the English and Dutch-speaking Caribbean and their diasporas.

We are pleased to announce the details of our second conference, to take place at the Institute for International Visual Arts (Iniva, London) on 3rd and 4th December, 2013. Speakers include: Alessio Antoniolli (UK), Marielle Barrow (Trinidad), Charles Campbell (Jamaica/UK), Annalee Davis (Barbados), Joy Gregory (UK), Therese Hadchity (Barbados), Glenda Heyliger (Aruba), Rosemarijn Hoefte (Netherlands), Yudhishthir Raj Isar (France/India), Nancy Jouwe (Netherlands), Charl Landvreugd (Netherlands), Wayne Modest (Netherlands), Petrona Morrison (Jamaica), Jynell Osborne (Guyana), Marcel Pinas (Suriname), Dhiradj Ramsamoedj (Suriname), Leon Wainwright (UK), and Kitty Zijlmans (Netherlands). http://www.iniva.org/events/what_s_on/sustainable_art_communities_conference

Book your place online. https://sustainableartcommunities.eventbrite.co.uk/
If you have any queries please call 020 7749 1240 or email bookings@rivingtonplace.org

Conference 1:
Our first conference took place at the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam on 5th and 6th February 2013.
View video footage of the conference on the Open Arts Archive: http://www.openartsarchive.org/oaa/archive/818
 
About us
‘Sustainable Art Communities: Creativity and Policy in the Transnational Caribbean’ is a two-year international research project led by Dr Leon Wainwright (The Open University, UK) and Professor Dr Kitty Zijlmans (Leiden University), funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC, UK), in partnership with the Tropenmuseum, Amsterdam; Iniva, the Institute of International Visual Arts, London; and Rivington Place.

Visit the project web pages at: http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/sac/

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