CFP: “Critical Race Art Histories in Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe” @ CAA2018

The following session for the 2018 College Art Association Annual Conference in Los Angeles, February, 21 – 24, 2018 is sponsored by the Historians of German, Scandinavian, and Central European Art (HGSCEA). They especially welcome submissions from ACRAH members.

Critical Race Art Histories in Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe

Chair: Allison Morehead, Queen’s University

Critical race theory, which entered art history through postcolonial analyses of representations of black bodies, has remained relatively peripheral to art historical studies of Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe, whose colonial histories differ from those of countries such as Britain, France, and the United States. At the same time, art historical examinations of white supremacy in the Nazi period are frequently sectioned off from larger histories of claims to white superiority and privilege. Centering critical race theory in the art histories of Germany, Scandinavia, and Central Europe, this panel will consider representations of race in the broadest of terms — including “white makings of whiteness,” in the words of Richard Dyer. We invite papers that together will explore the imagination and construction of a spectrum of racial and ethnic identities, as well as marginalization and privilege, in and through German, Scandinavian, and Central European art, architecture, and visual culture in any period. How have bodies been racialized through representation, and how might representations of spaces, places, and land — the rural or wilderness vs. the urban, for instance — also be critically analyzed in terms of race? Priority will be given to papers that consider the intersections of race with other forms of subjectivity and identity.

Please send 250-word proposals, a completed session participation proposal form, and a short academic CV to Allison Morehead at morehead@queensu.ca by 14 August 2017.

Please consult the guidelines at the end of the CAA Call for Participation (http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/call-for-participation.pdf) for further details.

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CFP: CAA 2017 @ New York City

Submission Portal: https://caa.submittable.com/submit

CAA 105th ANNUAL CONFERENCE – FEBRUARY 15-18, 2017, NEW YORK, NY

The call for proposals for 2017 begins March 1, 2016, and ends April 18, 2016.

The Annual Conference Committee invites session and paper proposals that cover the breadth of current thought and research in art, art and architectural history, theory and criticism, pedagogical issues, museum and curatorial practice, conservation, and developments in technology.

All sessions will be 90 minutes in length.  Please plan accordingly.

To submit a proposal individuals must be current CAA members.  If you are not a current member, please renew your membership or join CAA.  Please note that all session participants and leaders must also be current CAA members and register for the conference. Online registration for the CAA 105th Annual Conference will begin in mid-September and end in late December.

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION TYPES:

  • Complete Session (CAA committees should use this option)
  • Session Soliciting Contributors
  • Individual Paper
  • Affiliated Society Complete Session

KEY DATES

  • March 1 – Call for Annual Conference session and paper proposals begins
  • April 18 – Deadline for session and paper proposal submissions
  • June 3 – Annual Conference Committee meets to select sessions and papers
  • June 20 – Notification sent regarding approved sessions
  • July 1 – Call for Participation for approved sessions soliciting contributors
  • August 30 – Paper titles and abstracts due for sessions soliciting contributors
  • Mid-September – Online conference registration opens
  • September 30 – Deadline for chairs to choose speakers for sessions soliciting contributors; deadline for poster session submissions
  • Late December – Online conference registration closes

ACRAH at CAA 2016/Washington DC

See you next month at the College Art Association annual conference in Washington, D.C, to be held at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel for ACRAH’s session:

“Beyond the Veil: An Inside Look at the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture”

Saturday, February 6, 2016, 12:30-2 PM

See: Beyond the Veil session info

The session will be held in WASHINGTON 1 (EXHIBITION LEVEL) of the CAA Conference Hotel:

Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel

2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC, 20008

Tel. 202 302-2000

Travel to the CAA Conference Hotel

CAA 2016 Conference Registration Info at: Attending ACRAH Session at CAA 2016/Washington DC

CFP: Art, Race, and Christianity @ CAA 2016

Call for Papers: Art, Race, and Christianity
Affiliated Society: Association for Critical Race Art History
Phoebe Wolfskill, Indiana University, pwolfski@indiana.edu and James Romaine, Nyack College, drjamesromaine@gmail.com
College Art Association Annual Conference, February 3-6, 2016, Washington, DC

Session Description: Since its arrival in the Americas, Christianity has been inextricably linked to issues of racial identity. The religious foundations of the European immigrants who colonized the New World diverged from the practices of indigenous and uprooted African populations, often resulting in a conflict of spiritual identities, a struggle that frequently found its place in artistic expression. This panel seeks papers focusing on the relationship between race and faith in North American and Caribbean art created from the nineteenth century to the present. How does art function as a site in which intersecting racial and religious tensions have been expressed, debated, or potentially resolved? How does an artist (or community of artists) negotiate an identity that is situated between or within racial and religious identities? In what ways does racial identity or racial difference influence depictions of Christian subjects and themes? What specific contexts allowed for or required the negotiation of racial identity and Christian subjects? We welcome broad conceptions of race and a range of media for exploration.

Session participants must be a member of CAA.

Every proposal should include the following five items:
1. Completed session participation proposal form, located at the end of the pdf http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2016CallforParticipation.pdf or an email with this information.
2. Preliminary abstract of one to two double-spaced, typed pages.
3. Letter explaining speaker’s interest, expertise in the topic, and CAA membership status.
4. CV with home and office mailing addresses, email address, and phone and fax numbers. Include summer address and telephone number, if applicable.
5. Documentation of work when appropriate, especially for sessions in which artists might discuss their own work.

Please send proposals to:
Phoebe Wolfskill, Indiana University, pwolfski@indiana.edu and James Romaine, Nyack College, drjamesromaine@gmail.com

DEADLINE: May 8, 2015

CFP for College Art Association session (2016, Washington, DC)- Due May 8, 2015

AFROTROPES

College Art Association 104th Annual Conference

Washington DC, February 36, 2016

Huey Copeland and Krista Thompson, Northwestern University

Submissions due to h-copeland@northwestern.edu and krista-thompson@northwestern.edu by May 8, 2015. Visit http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2016CallforParticipation.pdf for CAA submission guidelines, requirements, and forms.

This conference session centers on the aesthetic, historical, and theoretical terrain opened up by the “afrotrope.” We coined this neologism as a way of referring to those recurrent visual forms that have emerged within and become central to the formation of African diasporic culture and identity in the modern era, from the slave ship icon produced in 1788 by the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade to the “I AM A MAN” signs famously held up by striking Memphis sanitation workers in 1968.

As their rich afterlives make clear, afrotropes resonate widely long after their initial appearance. For instance, the “IAM A MAN” sign has served as the basis for a 1988 painting by Glenn Ligon, a sandwich board worn by Sharon Hayes during a 2005 New York street performance, and a poster wielded by protesters in Benghazi during the Arab Spring. Accordingly, our conceptualization of the afrotrope emphasizes how changes to cultural forms over time and space speak to the ways that touchstones of African diasporic history, subjectivity, and modes of resistance are produced and consumed globally by a range of actors for a variety of ends.

By homing in on the material transformation of specific afrotropes over several iterations, we hope to reframe approaches to the ways that modes of cultural exchange come to structure representational possibilities. While our theorization of the afrotrope is indebted to Mikhail Bakhtin’s notion of the chronotope and Henry Louis Gates Jr.’s writing on black figurative turns, we also look toward the work of art historians such as T.J. Clark, George Kubler, and Christopher Wood in elaborating new models for thinking temporality, authorship, and transmission that the afrotrope at once instances and demands.

Indeed, we would argue that the afrotrope makes palpable how modern subjects have appropriated widely available representational means only to undo their formal contours and to break apart their significatory logic. At the same time, the concept enables a fresh consideration of what is repressed or absented within the visual archive. The afrotrope, in other words, offers a vital heuristic through which to understand how visual motifs take on flesh over time and to reckon with that which remains unknown or cast out of the visual field. Ultimately, the aim of our session is not only to identify key afrotropes—with an eye toward producing an edited user’s guide to these forms—but also to theorize how their transmission illuminates the visual technologies of modern cultural formation.

CFP: “BUILDING A MULTIRACIAL AMERICAN PAST” @ CAA 2015

Chair: Susanna Gold, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, gold@temple.edu

The dynamics of mixed race heritage has long been a stable point of inquiry in historical American literature, music, theater, politics and speech, but this issue has been thought to emerge less often in visual culture.  There are very few examples of American art that follow the tradition of 18th-century Mexican and Peruvian casta paintings illustrating the practice and results of mestizaje, the mixing of distinct categories of peoples and the development of new peoples.  But are American images of multiracialism truly rare, or is the art historical scholarship limited because there lacks a clear academic understanding of which images can be understood to address mixed race heritage?  Is there a cultural tendency for scholars to classify figures in American art according to an overly determinate white/non white dichotomy, which avoids the relevance of a shared, divided, or indistinct racial ancestry?  This session invites papers that enlarge the art historical scholarship on race mixing, and provide new possibilities for recognizing and analyzing how complexities of a multiracial heritage affected identity construction and found expression in visual imagery.  Papers that address art practices in the art of the United States, 18th-20th centuries, are welcome.

Please send paper title, abstract (200-300 words), curriculum vitae, and letter of interest to Susanna Gold (gold@temple.edu) by May 9, 2014.
For more information about the 2015 conference, please see: http://www.collegeart.org/pdf/2015CallforParticipation.pdf