The Grapevine

Anatomy/Academy Graduate Symposium @ PAFA

March 26, 2011, 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Free after museum admission.

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts will host a graduate symposium in
conjunction with the exhibition *Anatomy/Academy: Nexus of Art and Science*

In tribute to Philadelphia’s historical importance as a center for the
artistic and anatomical study of the human body, this symposium examines the
body in relation to the material and visual culture of American art,
focusing on how Philadelphia’s dynamic art and science communities fostered
knowledge of the human body from the early nineteenth century to the
present.

Continue reading “Anatomy/Academy Graduate Symposium @ PAFA”

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PUB: Southern Cultures

In celebration of Black History Month, Southern Cultures permanently has
dedicated a new section of our website to all of our essays and features
from the last decade on AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE.  This material
includes interviews with many famous figures (and lesser known ones, too),
as well as material which explores many aspects of the experiences of
African Americans inside and outside the South.  In addition, we’ve also
been presenting featured content on our homepage to commemorate African
American history: an essay from  Timothy B. Tyson, author of Blood Done Sign
My Name, who reveals why Martin Luther King’s message  endures and what he
means to the South and the nation.

To date, over 65,000 readers have viewed our material online.  To read our
new section on AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE, please visit:
http://www.southerncultures.org/content/read/read_by_subject/african_american_history_and_culture/

To read Tim Tyson’s “Martin Luther King and the Southern Dream of Freedom,”
please visit:
www.SouthernCultures.org<http://www.SouthernCultures.org>

CFP: BEND! Photography, Gender, & the Politics of Representation

Call for Papers

BEND! Photography, Gender, & the Politics of Representation

An Interdisciplinary Symposium
Princeton University, April 22-23, 2011

Keynote Speaker: Professor George Baker, Department of Art History, UCLA

The past decade has witnessed widespread institutional and scholarly efforts to historicize the relation between art and feminism, and between art and identity politics. These efforts unfold in a present that is often characterized as “post-gender” and/or “post-racial.” Just as categories of identity seem to lose traction in cultural discourse, so boundaries between artistic media become unfixed. Yet photographic representation is increasingly pervasive, and increasingly bound to the performance of subjectivity.
This symposium aims to consider the interrelated production of gender and photography, along with their dissolution as stable categories of inquiry. An interrogation of photography today requires looking within as well as beyond the boundaries of traditional art-historical frameworks. It compels us to account for the political and social dimensions in which photography participates, and demands that we re-consider the mise-en-scène of photography’s production as art.
How has the evolution of photography—from b/w to color, from analogue to digital, from mass media to social media—served to articulate or blur aesthetic and subjective differences? What politics of representation emerge when the individual can be both agent and object of photographic voyeurism, exhibitionism, and surveillance? Might photography’s expanded field offer the potential for reshaping feminist politics today?
We invite participants to explore historical, existing and possible relationships between photography and the (re)production of gender, from the perspectives of visual culture, philosophy, (art) history, and art practice.  Papers might consider photography in relation to:
gender bending – histories and politics of sexuality – performance and/or portraiture – the construction of masculinity – women artists – representations of gender, race, and class – advocacy, activism, and political practice – feminist politics, ethics, and aesthetics – medical and biological discourses – capitalism, terrorism, and war


We welcome submissions from graduate students and emerging scholars in all fields and disciplines.  Please submit a CV and 300-word abstract for a 20-minute paper by March 1, 2011 to Frances Jacobus-Parker, Elena Peregrina-Salvador, and Mareike Stoll at princetonphotography2011@gmail.com.

Romare Bearden, American Modernist @ National Gallery of Art

A program celebrating the publication
Romare Bearden, American Modernist

Monday, March 14, 2011
4:30 p.m.

East Building Auditorium

Romare Bearden, American Modernist: An Introduction
Ruth Fine, curator of special projects in modern art, National Gallery of Art

Romare Bearden and the Art of the Grotesque
Mary Schmidt Campbell, dean, Tisch School of the Arts, New York University

Please see announcement for complete program (PDF 470KB).

The publication Romare Bearden, American Modernist will be available in spring 2011 from Gallery Shops.

No RSVP required.

Third International Maroon Conference, “The Return,” in Charles Town, Portland, Jamaica, June 22-25 2011

Dear Colleagues:

I have pasted below the call for papers for the Third International Maroon Conference, “The Return,” in Charles Town, Portland, Jamaica, June 22-25 2011.

This multidisciplinary conference seeks papers and panels that explore representations of Maroon culture in history, literature, art, music, political theory, cultural studies, film, linguistics, and theatre. With its theme “The Return,” it strives to revisit the roots of Maroon values and practices, considering the ways they have endured, transformed and resonated in the Caribbean, Canada, South America, Europe, the United States and Africa.  Offering a unique combination of scholarly panels and cultural events, the third international Maroon conference aims to increase awareness of Maroon contributions to contemporary societies, bringing together descendents of Maroons with scholars interested in Maroon heritage and indigenous cultures.

The conference cultural events and entertainment will commemorate the Annual Quao Victory Day (June 23), and they are part of a larger effort to develop strategies for sustainable development and wealth creation in Maroon communities.

Please send abstracts by 15 March or inquiries to fbotkin@towson.edu

CFP: Revisiting the Civil War – SECAC 2011

CALL FOR PAPERS:
SECAC 2011, November 9-12 in Savannah, GA

Revisiting the Civil War:

As sesquicentenntial commemorations of the Civil War unfold, it seems a propitious time to consider what influence the war had on art, artists, and visual culture in the United States. This panel
seeks to broadly consider the impact of the war on representation, patronage, collecting, and the art market both during and after the conflict. Topics may include but are not limited to: explorations of the ways in which artists on both sides of the conflict depicted slavery and the war, the role that photographers and the pictorial press played in presenting the war to American and international audiences, the use of propaganda and the visual culture of the state during the war, the appearance of Civil War imagery in later painting and public monuments, the iconography of post-war sectional identity, and the impact of the war on Northern and Southern fortunes and art patronage.

To participate, please visit: http://www.secollegeart.org/annual-conference.html to complete a call for papers proposal form. Please submit completed forms (including a 200 word max. abstract) and a current c.v. to Akela Reason, Assistant Professor at University of Georgia at areason@uga.edu by April, 20, 2011.