Call for New Sessions SECAC 2022 in Baltimore–Deadline Apr. 14, 2022

The Call for New Sessions for SECAC 2022 in Baltimore is open through Thursday, April 14 at https://secac.secure-platform.com/a/solicitations/18/home.

Now that we are reviewing the roster of sessions that were originally scheduled for 2021, we would like to invite proposals for newly conceived sessions. We are especially interested in new ideas, themes, and approaches, and in combined art history and studio art sessions, where appropriate. This call for new session proposals will be followed by a corresponding (and final) call for papers. 

Link to abstracts of sessions advanced from 2021:  https://secac.secure-platform.com/a/page/sessions


Conference Dates: October 26 – 29, 2022
Venue: Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel
Conference Director: Kerr Houston
Contact: secac2022@mica.edu
Call for Sessions: March 22 – April 14, 2022
Website: https://secacart.org/page/Baltimore

The Maryland Institute College of Art is excited to act as the institutional host for the 78th annual meeting of SECAC in Baltimore, MD, from October 26-29, 2022. Based at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel and informed by the theme Watershed, the conference seeks to foster thoughtful analyses of the myriad intersections between art, art history, education, and social and environmental justice. To that end, more than 130 individual sessions will be supplemented by a keynote address by the artist, educator and 2016 MacArthur fellow Joyce Scott, and by three optional walking tours led by local architectural historians, artists and activists. The conference will also include a show of work by the 2021 Artist’s Fellowship winner Brianna Harlan and an exhibition of work by SECAC members, juried by the artist and curator Jeffrey Kent Attendees will have the chance, too, to explore Baltimore’s rich artistic landscape, from The Walters Art Museum and the Baltimore Museum of Art to the American Visionary Art Museum, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, and a vibrant local gallery scene. The conference hotel is within convenient walking distance of Baltimore’s celebrated Inner Harbor, as well as a number of nearby restaurants, historical sites, and attractions. MICA looks forward to welcoming you to Charm City!

If you wish to stop receiving email from us, you can simply remove yourself by visiting: http://secacart.org/members/EmailOptPreferences.aspx?id=55025866&e=keri.watson@ucf.edu&h=47c2f92155d7b436c1cc8d397a57a08239262053

SECAC
PO Box 9773
Wilmington, DE 19809-9773

Advertisement

CFP: Association of Print Scholars at CAA2023

The Association of Print Scholars (APS) invites thematic proposals for its sponsored panel at the 2023 College Art Association (CAA) Annual Conference to be held in New York, NY, February 15–18, 2023.

The APS-sponsored panel may be related to any period, theme, or aspect of print scholarship. We encourage proposals that transcend chronological or geographic boundaries, as well as those that engage current theoretical interests in materialism, archival theory, bibliographic studies, history of ideas, or social history, including feminisms and critical race studies.

If you are interested in chairing a panel, please submit a title and 250-word abstract by April 15, 2022. Co-chaired proposals are welcome. Once the theme and chair of the panel are selected, the panel will solicit contributors through CAA’s open call. Chair or co-chairs must be members in good standing of APS and CAA.
Please send your proposed panel’s title and abstract, along with a 2-page CV to caacoordinator@printscholars.org. The deadline for consideration is April 15, 2022.
Note:The College Art Association’s Annual Conference is scheduled to take place in New York, NY, February 15–18, 2023. There is a possibility of an additional virtual component.

You may view this announcement online.

Terra Foundation Convening Grants

The Terra Foundation for American Art actively supports convenings worldwide that question and broaden definitions of American art. Grant funding is available for programs that foster exchange and collaboration, such as workshops, symposia, and colloquia. Programs should advance innovative and experimental research and professional practice in American art and address critical issues facing the field. This program is open to organizations worldwide.

Letters of Inquiry Deadline: April 1

To apply, please visit our website: https://www.terraamericanart.org/what-we-offer/grant-fellowship-opportunities/convening-grants/

USC Cinema and Media Studies 2021 Graduate Student Conference [Oct. 21-22, 28-29]–

First Forum will be held virtually and the program schedule has panels and events spread out over two weeks on October 21, 22, 28, and 29. We have an exciting and dynamic set of speakers including our keynote speaker Dr. Bo Ruberg, an Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at UC Irvine. Additionally, we will have a roundtable discussion featuring Dr. Erin Y. Huang, Dr. Camilla Fojas, and Dr. Ayesha Omer. You can find a full conference schedule on our website and through the QR code on the attached flyer. We look forward to seeing you there!

Amalia Amaki at the Photography Network Virtual Symposium [October 7-9, 2021]

Artist and scholar Amalia Amaki will be our Keynote for “The Material and the Virtual in Photographic Histories” (October 7-9, 2021). The First Symposium of the Photography Network will be held virtually, jointly hosted by the Photography Network and Folkwang University of the Arts, Essen. We are looking forward to our conversation with her on Thursday, October 7 at 4:00-4:45 pm UTC (12:00–12:45 pm EST) about her impressive art range and her ability to stretch the limits of photography’s materiality. The three-day symposium will pair previously recorded presentations (now available to registered attendees) with live roundtable discussions and Q&A sessions on October 7th, 8th, and 9th.

Registration is open and the presentation videos are live for the First Symposium of the Photography Network (October 7–9, 2021), a virtual event. Register nowRegistration for this free event is now open. Symposium attendees are required to be current Photography Network members in good standing. Annual membership is $20 (student/unaffiliated), $40 (Affiliated), or $100 (Sustaining Member). Please visit the Photography Network’s website for more information on how to join. Once a member, link to the live sessions under the Account feature by clicking “Symposium_live (affiliated).”

CFP: New Scholars @ American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference

ASECS 2022
52nd Annual Meeting
Hilton Baltimore Inner Harbor
March 31–April 2, 2022
Annual Meeting Website: https://www.asecs2022.org/

Anne Schroder New Scholars Session [Historians of Eighteenth-Century Art and Architecture]
Dipti Khera (New York University), dipti.khera@nyu.edu; and Aaron Wile (National Gallery of Art), A-Wile@nga.gov
This is an open session for advanced graduate students and early career scholars in the art and architectural history of the long eighteenth century around the globe. We especially encourage submissions from underrepresented scholars; those who work in universities, museums, and para-academic institutions outside of North America and/or in adjunct employment positions; and those who define their stakes, topics, and temporal frames for the eighteenth century through visual/material/spatial analyses in relation to histories of enslavement, colonization, and the racialization and discrimination of bodies, knowledge, places, and objects.
Proposals should be sent directly to the session chairs no later than 17 September 2021.

CFP: Black Collage @ CAA2022

caa.confex.com/caa/2022/webprogrampreliminary/Session9195.html
caa.confex.com/caa/2022/webprogrampreliminary/meeting.html

Black Collage
Session will present: Virtual

Julie L. McGee, University of Delaware
Email Address(s):mcgee@udel.edu

Black Collage, before and beyond Romare Bearden, respects the multivalent nature inherent to Black and Collage. How have and do artists and scholars participate in the un-doing of modernist tropes associated with a history of collage that displaced Black subjectivity and agency? Black collage may adhere to a practice of coller, in reference to the French verb which means to paste or glue, but in ways that don’t inherently bind this practice to European Modernism, Pablo Picasso or Georges Braque. Suppose coller hews more to adhesive than metaphor–that Black collage transcends pieces for compositional uniqueness, a symphony’s manuscript. Black American artists used collage before Bearden, yet there is no denying the centrality of his work to this conversation. Indeed, Bearden’s significance calls us to think deeply about the extended practice and importance of collage and Black artists. Among the many who have are Ralph Ellison, Kobena Mercer, Patricia Hills, James Smalls, Jacqueline Francis, Ruth Fine, and Brent Hayes Edwards. In early 1961, while living in Stockholm, Sam Middleton completed a treatise on collage that placed his own work in a direct line of inheritance from Picasso and Cubism to Surrealism and Dada—for its radical aesthetic refusals and nowness. Appropriating Shahn, Middleton wrote, “Art always has its ingredients of impudence, its rejection of established order so that it may substitute its own fresh and contemporary authority and its own enlightenment.” This session invites contributions related to Black collage, audacity and enlightenment. Considerations of history, theory, conservation, and artistic practice are welcome.

CFP: Nineteenth-Century Studies Association Conference

RADICALISM & REFORM
The 43rd Annual Conference
Nineteenth-Century Studies Association
Rochester, New York
March 16-19, 2022
Proposal Deadline: September 30, 2021

Conference Website: ncsaweb.net/conferences/2022-ncsa-conference-information/

Join NCSA’s mailing list: mailchi.mp/4b3379af336e/ncsamailinglist

Inspired by the history of radicalism and reform in Rochester, New York, the NCSA committee invites proposals exploring the radical possibilities of the nineteenth-century world. From the aftershocks of the French and American revolutions to mutinies and rebellion in colonies across the globe, the nineteenth century was a period of both unrest and possibility. Abolition, suffrage, and reform movements reshaped prisons, education, and housing, marking this century as a period of institutional making and unmaking: a reckoning with ills of the past that was also profoundly optimistic about a more just and prosperous future.

Radicalism is also a generative term for considering transitional moments or social tensions: “radical” is often used interchangeably with “extreme,” but its earliest definitions describe not what is new or unusual, but what is foundational or essential. “Radical” is used to describe literal and figurative roots: the roots of plants, roots of musical chords, and the roots of words. To be radical is to embody tensions between origins and possibilities: to be anchored in what is foundational while also holding the potential for paradigm-shifting change. We welcome papers that consider these tensions in nineteenth-century culture, as well as those that consider possibilities for reforming nineteenth-century studies or academic life. Topics on nineteenth-century literature, history, art, music, or other cultural forms might include political movements or divisions, activism, resistance, labor, collective and direct action, or mutinies and rebellion. We also encourage broader interpretations of the conference theme: outsiders and outcasts, visionaries, agents of change, utopias, breakthroughs, failed reforms, conformity, or stagnation.

Topics on the state of nineteenth-century studies might include politically engaged teaching and scholarship, academic labor practices, harassment or prejudice in the academy, or new approaches to humanities education.

For more information, visit: ncsaweb.net/conferences/2022-ncsa-conference-information/

CFP: Beyond In/visibility: the Politics of Asian American Representation in American Art History (for CAA Annual Conference 2022) –submit by Aug. 30, 2021

CFP for CAA Annual Conference 2022

Beyond In/visibility: the Politics of Asian American Representation in American Art History (Association of Historians of American Art [AHAA] Panel Session)

What are the consequences of asking for greater Asian American visibility in art history?

We are reckoning anew with our discipline’s intellectual and material priorities which have enforced racial-class-gender hierarchies and American imperialist and exceptionalist ideologies. Across museums and universities, immediate solutions call for increased inclusion and representation of marginalized peoples into existing historical canons. What are the limits of these correctives for peoples who have been dehumanized through aestheticization and surveillance throughout American history, and endangered because of their hypervisibility in everyday life? Now over 50 years since the term “Asian American” emerged as a disciplinary and political category, we must reflect on ways to narrate the specificities of the Asian diaspora within American academies and museums beyond the binaries of visible/invisible, inclusion/exclusion.

This panel invites ongoing research, curatorial case studies, and experimental methodologies that engage with issues such as: How has “Asian [United States] American” been a useful and limiting category for research, curation, and museum interpretation? What are strategies to present the historical absence or loss of Asian American subjects in archives and permanent collections? Are there ways to identify unconventional presence through creative citation or display practices? How might Asian American art histories attend to moments of solidarity and failure with respect to Black, Latinx, Indigenous and Pacific Islander communities and objects? How can Asian American art histories counter existing disciplinary priorities to aestheticize, visibly represent, visually clarify, expose, access, and possess its subjects—for example, through opacity, obscuration, dis-orientation, mistranslation, protective veiling?

Please submit by August 20, 2021

SYMP: Teaching the ‘Long’ 18th Century


https://virginia.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_qPSWyVTlSzCdu6PkVWVUlw

%d bloggers like this: